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FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2013 file photo, then-Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks at the State Department in Washington. On Friday, the State Department posted 296 Benghazi-related emails from Hillary Clinton's private server.  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

Let’s see the server

There’s a media consensus that there’s no “smoking gun” in the emails that Hillary Clinton, the former secretary of State and presidential candidate, has “persuaded” the department she presided over for so long to release to the public.

In this May 24, 2015 photo, police pick up a pair of shoes after a double shooting in Baltimore. Baltimore city police said dozens of people have been shot and at least eight killed in a series of separate weekend shootings. The Baltimore Sun reported that 35 people have been killed so far in May, making it the deadliest month in Baltimore since December 1999. (Colin Campbell/The Baltimore Sun via AP)

Collateral damage in the ghetto

The morgue in Baltimore is getting crowded. The riots that convulsed the city last month have subsided, and the fusillade of rocks and bricks and the burning of cars and shops has been replaced by a more frightening violence — murder in wholesale lot.

FILE - In this Nov. 12, 2014 file photo, the HealthCare.gov website, where people can buy health insurance, on a laptop screen, is seen in Portland, Ore. If the latest health overhaul case before the Supreme Court gets decided the way most Republicans want, it could have a politically painful unintended consequence for GOP lawmakers.   (AP Photo/Don Ryan, File)

Paying the devil in the details

Obamacare seems about to implode, and the implosion could be a great contribution to those who would reform America’s health system in a systematic way. The nation will have to get it right the second time around.

Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus speaks at the Southern Republican Leadership Conference in Oklahoma City, on Thursday, May 21, 2015. (AP Photo/Alonzo Adams)

Setting up the presidential debates

Out of work politicians with time on their hands once occupied themselves by fishing, collecting stamps or learning full-hitch macrame. But that was so 20th century. Now they run for president, some of them more than once, sometimes with no more experience at dealing with problems than talking about them. Is this a great country, or what? But running for president finally threatens to overwhelm the presidential debates.

Visitors touches the names at the wall of Vietnam Veterans Memorial, during a Memorial Day candlelight vigil at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, DC., Friday, May 22, 2015.  (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

‘Peace is the right memorial’

Memorial Day in America has traditionally been a time when we pay our respects to those who gave their lives, over a century ago, in a tragic civil war. In a broader sense, it has come to stand not only for the sacrifice of those who served in the War Between the States, but for all of those who have given their lives in arms since the birth of our nation.

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President Barack Obama waves as he departs Westchester County Airport in Harrison, N.Y., Wednesday, May 20, 2015, following a trip to New York and Connecticut where he delivered the commencement speech at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in New London, CT.  (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

Questions for Mr. Obama

Washington's chattering class is still buzzing over the question posed to Jeb Bush — would he, knowing what he knows now about his brother's shock-and-awe campaign against Saddam Hussein and Iraq, do it again? (Having been burned once by sitting on a red-hot wood stove, would he sit there again?)

Civilians flee their hometown of Ramadi, the capital of Iraq's Anbar province, 115 kilometers (70 miles) west of Baghdad, Monday, May 18, 2015. Islamic State militants searched door-to-door for policemen and pro-government fighters and threw bodies in the Euphrates River in a bloody purge Monday after capturing the strategic city of Ramadi, their biggest victory since overrunning much of northern and western Iraq last year. (AP Photo)

Disaster in Iraq

The Islamic State -- or ISIS, or Daesh, or whatever we're calling it this week -- has won a stunning victory with the collapse of the Iraqi army and the conquest of Ramadi and Anbar. The attempt by the Obama administration to spin it any other way is foolish. The loss is an enormous gain for the forces of radical Islamic terrorism.

The military had 2,837 active-duty chaplains as of December 2014  but recent high-profile cases of military chaplains facing punishment for private counseling sessions that reflected the teachings of their religion could cause devout Americans who are qualified for military service to think twice about joining the U.S. military. (Associated Press)

The lot of the atheist

The lot of an atheist true unbeliever is not a happy one. He is surrounded on all sides by believers, and he knows he's missing something. He must chip away at the beliefs of others to assuage his doubts and fears.

Nepalese army men search for the missing U.S. Marine helicopter in the earthquake affected Dolakha District, Nepal, Thursday, May 14, 2015. The helicopter carrying six Marines and two Nepalese soldiers disappeared Tuesday while delivering aid in the country's northeast, U.S. officials said. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)

'We stand with Nepal'

In an age of celebrity worship, when the public drapes the mantle of heroism on rock stars, film goddesses and the giants of sport who haven't done anything to earn it, it's easily forgotten that true heroes are those who risk all, including their very lives, for the sake of others. American servicemen and women fit that description, stepping fearlessly into the shadow of the valley of death.

George Stephanopoulos during an ABC broadcast. (AP Photo/ABC, Heidi Gutman, File)

The Stephanopoulos example

George Stephanopoulos of ABC News illustrates the reason why so many Americans don't any longer trust what they read and hear from press and tube. In an earlier time he would have known better than to contribute money, and a substantial sum of it, to those he pretends to cover. "Fair and balanced" was more than a clever marketing slogan.

In this aerial photo taken May 13, 2015, emergency personnel work at the scene of a deadly train wreck in Philadelphia. Amtrak faces what probably will be a $200 million payout to crash victims _ the cap established by Congress nearly 20 years ago as part of a compromise to rescue the railroad from financial ruin. It would be the first time that the liability ceiling, considered by many to be too low to cover the costs of the eight lives lost and 200 people injured, designed for Amtrak actually would apply to the railroad.  (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

All aboard for more arguments

Before the wreckage of the fatal crash in Philadelphia was cleared, the politicians in Washington began to fight over the damaged carcass of Amtrak, the troubled national passenger railroad.

FILE - This Oct. 20, 2014 file photo shows George Stephanopoulos at the 24th Annual Broadcasting and Cable Hall of Fame Awards in New York. Stephanopoulos has apologized for not notifying his employer and viewers about two contributions totaling $50,000 that he made to the Clinton Foundation. ABC's news division said Thursday, May 15, 2015, that "we stand behind him." The donations, made in two installments in 2013 and 2014 and first reported in Politico, were made because of Stephanopoulos' interest in the foundation's work on global AIDS prevention and deforestation, he said. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)

The $75,000 question

Contrary to what they sometimes think of themselves, neither journalists nor intelligence agents are 10 feet tall. They're usually intelligent, well spoken and often have sharp skills at what they do. But not always. Sometimes the best of them blunder at what they do best. Two examples are currently contributing to the buzz of the chattering class.

Congress chose Yucca Mountain as the leading candidate for nuclear waste disposal. But opponents are concerned about contamination, and the Obama administration said it would not consider the site and would look for alternatives. It won a legal battle when a federal appeals court ruled last week against three states seeking to ship spent fuel to the Nevada site. (Associated Press)

Unlocking Yucca Mountain

Harry Reid almost got away with wasting billions of the taxpayers' money on a big hole in the ground in his home state of Nevada. With the senator from Searchlight moving swiftly toward retirement, the enormous bunker beneath Yucca Mountain will soon be the needed storage bin for America's spent nuclear fuel. And not a day too soon. The radioactive waste has been accumulating for years at unsecured sites across the continent.

In this photo taken April 27, 2015, in Mountain Home, Ark., dog owner Sonny Brassfield holds nine of the 23 live .308 caliber rifle rounds his Belgian Malinois “Benno” chewed and swallowed. The dog is expected to fully recover from the two-hour surgery to remove the rounds.  (Josh Dooley/The Baxter Bulletin via AP) NO SALES; MANDATORY CREDIT

Guns in the land of grits and gravy

Mike Huckabee knows Arkansas, even if he did once call it a banana republic, which infuriated some of the locals at the Rotary Club. The former governor gave his latest memoir the provocative title, "God, Guns, Grits and Gravy," which gets it just about right in the land of good times and the magic huckleberry. He left out only frog-gigging, a favorite natural sport.

President Barack Obama pauses during a meeting with Saudi Arabian Crown Prince Mohammed bin Nayef, and Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, Wednesday, May 13, 2015, in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. The president said the derailment of Amtrak Train 188 "is a tragedy that touches us all." In a statement, Obama said he is offering prayers to the families who lost loved ones and the passengers beginning to recover.  (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

The Democrats put Obama in a stew

A filibuster led by Democrats derailed President Obama's request for the fast-track authority that would require the U.S. Senate to vote up-or-down on the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement. The negotiations, the filibuster and the fix the president has put himself in says everything about the differing Republican and Democratic positions on trade. It says a lot, too, about Mr. Obama's ineptitude in dealing his own congressional partisans.

What GOP must do in 2016

One of President George W. Bush's primary reasons for authorizing the invasion of Iraq in 2003 was to eliminate the threat of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Bush's rush to war, known as Operation Iraqi Freedom, was criticized because no WMD ever were uncovered. Still, U.S. forces remained there (and then in Afghanistan) for years.