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A man is comforted by others as he mourns over Egyptian Coptic Christians who were captured in Libya and killed by militants affiliated with the Islamic State group, outside of the Virgin Mary church in the village of el-Aour, near Minya, 220 kilometers (135 miles) south of Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Feb. 16, 2015. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar, File)

Mobilizing the Christians

The mainline Protestant churches in the United States, joined by Pope Francis, have shown great concern for many fashionable secular causes, such as eliminating poverty, promoting peace and promoting fear of global warming, but for Christians around the world under threat of persecution and annihilation, not so much.

FILE - This Nov. 24, 2014, file photo, shows the Phi Kappa Psi house at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Va. Three University of Virginia graduates and members of the fraternity profiled in a debunked account of a gang rape in a retracted Rolling Stone magazine story filed a lawsuit against the publication and the article's author Wednesday,July 29, 2015, court records show. . (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)

Trash on a Rolling Stone

Making up a story, if it’s about a designated villain, is hip in certain quarters but it’s never cool, as Rolling Stone magazine is learning in the sordid wake of its account of a gang rape at a fraternity house at the University of Virginia. It was a gang rape that by all recent accounts never happened.

Taiwanese President Ma Ying-jeou (Associated Press)

Drifting toward crisis on Taiwan

Xi Jinping, the president of the People’s Republic of China and the chairman of the ruling Communist Party, now says the delicate relationship between China and the Republic of China on Taiwan cannot continue, but refuses to meet President Ma Ying-jeou of Taiwan to talk about it. Therein lies a looming crisis for Washington.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky speaks to the media during a news conference following a Senate policy luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 2, 2015. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) ** FILE **

Mr. McConnell’s machinations

Congress is itching to get out of town, and Washington is itching to see them leave. The heat sometimes does strange things to congressional brains. Sen. Mitch McConnell, the leader of the Republicans in the Senate, spent most of a week persuading/forcing his colleagues to pass a six-year transportation bill that he knows will die in the House of Representatives.

A woman walks past an electronic board of a local bank showing the Hong Kong share index in Hong Kong Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2014. Global stocks sank under the weight of worries about the possible timing of a U.S. rate hike, economic weakness in China and an impending referendum on Scottish independence. Hong Kong's Hang Seng fell 1.9 percent to 24,705.36. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

China’s shaky economy

Three weeks ago shares on the Shanghai stock market fell by nearly a third in value, wiping out $3 trillion in profits. When the cavalry arrived, the Communist Party leaders threw everything they had to stop the hemorrhaging. Capitalism is particularly precious to Communists.

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Harry S. Truman

Where is a Democratic barn-burner?

If the Democrats want to be taken seriously, and something more than a party of self-righteous whiners, they must start acting like the party of Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S Truman and John F. Kennedy. All the fun shouldn't be left to the Republicans. Why should the nation be deprived of a contest for the Democratic nomination for president, the usual cat fight that always invigorated Democratic Party politics?

Robot rights rule!

The season of the Theater of the Absurd continues. After the Supreme Court twisted the clear meaning of plain English words to save Obamacare and bless same-sex marriage, after Iran hoodwinked Barack Obama into preserving and expanding its nuclear program, after Bruce Jenner remade himself (herself? itself?) into a buxom synthetic female, no one should be surprised when R2D2 wakes up to demand his civil rights, too. This might not be what Mr. Obama had in mind, but a conscientious radical accepts everything new, bad or not.

Scaffolding continues to go up on the dome of the U.S. Capitol Building, Washington, D.C., Thursday, September 18, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

End run by the credit unions

George Stigler won the 1982 Nobel Prize in Economics for work that changed forever the way economists look at government regulation of business and industry. Before Mr. Stigler, a colleague of Milton Friedman in the Chicago school of economics, the economists and politicians accepted the argument that government regulatory agencies, established to protect the public from abuse, accomplished exactly that. After Mr. Stigler's groundbreaking work, that sentiment was shared not so much.

FILE - In this June 16, 2015, file photo, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, , R-Ky., speaks to members of the media following the weekly Republican luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington. McConnell said July 20 he hopes to announce soon that he and Sen. Barbara Boxer of California have reached an agreement on a transportation bill. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

Working on the railroad

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell, whose rage at Democrats for the way they ran the Senate when they were the majority, is using some of their tactics to push a six-year highway bill through the Senate. Revisiting the highway funding debate must make senators believe they're caught in a remake of "Groundhog Day" because they've had to pass some 60 short-term extensions in recent years. Mr. McConnell wants to end that, pass a multiyear bill and move on.

Secretary of State John Kerry. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Facing the devil in the details

The details of President Obama's deal with Iran continue to leak, like muddy water from a bucket left to rust in the weeds. Several congressmen who lately called on the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna learned that there are secret "protocols" to the agreement Mr. Obama made with the mullahs of Tehran. Mr. Obama and the talking heads on television argue lamely that this is "always the way with such undertakings."

Illustration on the evils of Planned Parenthood by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Rotten to the core

The late Richard Pryor obviously wrote the defense used by the wonderful folks at Planned Parenthood, whose senior executives got caught on camera, twice, haggling over the price of the body parts -- lungs, livers, brains -- lifted from the bodies of unborn babies.

A voter can be seen in a voting booth Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014 in Honolulu.  Despite the rains and winds from Tropical Storm Iselle that pounded the state Friday, Hawaii will hold primary elections today.  (AP Photo/Marco Garcia)

Keeping the ballot secure

"Your vote counts" is a snappy slogan just short enough to fit on a lapel button, but snappy is not the same as "secure." As the 2016 campaign unfolds, there's renewed interest in enabling voters to vote over the Internet. The notion that choosing a president could be as easy as using a smartphone to order a pizza is tempting to some, but until cybersecurity wizards prove that a vote cast is a vote counted, Internet balloting is unreliably risky.

No haircut for the First Amendment

Once upon a time, the idea of giving the First Amendment a haircut never occurred to anyone. The constitutional guarantee of free speech was held to be the cornerstone of the unique American experiment in government of the people, by the people, and for the people. The Founding Fathers wrote it, plain, direct and so unambiguous that even a United States senator could understand it.

Liz Sullivan, mother of Kathryn Steinle, is consoled by Sabine Durden as she cries during the testimony of Kathryn's father Jim Steinle during a Senate Judiciary hearing in Washington on Tuesday. The family told Congress they support changing the laws that allowed her alleged killer to remain in the United States despite being deported several times. (Associated Press)

No sanctuary for lawbreakers

There's bad immigration news, but it's leavened by news that is a little better. The bad news is that the Center for Immigration Studies puts the number of illegal aliens crossing the border by the seventh year of the Obama administration at 2.5 million. The better news is that the number of illegals swarming to the United States has leveled off, owing to hundreds of thousands who have gone home. Arrivals and departures are now about even.

The Times Square military recruiting station displays insignia for each military branch, Friday, July 17, 2015, in New York.  Security at military recruiting and reserve centers will be reviewed in the aftermath of a deadly shooting in Tennessee. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

Give the soldiers a gun

The attacks on military recruiting offices continue because they're attractive targets for terrorists and they are, by necessity, located in vulnerable places. They're placed in high traffic areas so they will be highly visible -- they're intended to attract attention -- and they're staffed by soldiers, sailors and Marines shorn of the weapons they're trained to use.

President Obama asked Americans to wait for more facts about the Chattanooga shootings, and did not use the word "terror" to describe the attack. (Associated Press)

Obama takes his deal to the U.N.

President Obama got the endorsement of his Iranian "deal" Monday that probably means the most to him, a unanimous vote by the United Nations Security Council. Samantha Power, the U.S. ambassador to the U.N, and Gholamali Khoshroo, the Iranian ambassador the U.N., fell over each other to get up to say what a terrific occasion the day was.

Daly Simmons, 26, sits as she prays in front of a makeshift memorial outside the Armed Forces Career Center Saturday, July 18, 2015, in Chattanooga, Tenn.    Muhammad Youssef Abdulazeez, of Hixson, Tenn., attacked two military facilities on Thursday, in a shooting rampage that killed four Marines and one U.S. Navy sailor.  (AP Photo/Mark Zaleski)

A call to arms

Chattanooga joins Fort Hood and Little Rock as indictments of the continuing failure of the nation's strategy for eliminating the threat of Islamic terrorism. The man entrusted with the responsibility for keeping America safe won't even call the threat by its right name. Hint: It's not "workplace violence."

Dinesh D'Souza. ** FILE **

The deprogramming of Dinesh D'Souza

Arrogance is ugly wherever found, and it's particularly ugly in a judge with the power to deprive a man of his freedom. Dinesh D'Souza is an author, filmmaker and onetime college president who was convicted of violating campaign finance law.