Skip to content


Featured Articles

Looking for a speaker

Given the challenges that come with the job, John Boehner has done some things well as the speaker of the House and the leader of the Republican majority. But what he doesn’t do well is communicate with the world beyond the Beltway. Washington often forgets that “beyond the Beltway” is where everybody lives.

The coming coding conundrum

“Gray’s Anatomy” illustrated the entire human body with 1,247 engravings when it was published in 1918, but starting today doctors must employ nearly 70,000 codes to document their efforts to heal it.

Russian President President Vladimir Putin listens to United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon after the 70th session of the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters, New York, Monday, Sept. 28, 2015. (Mikhail Klimentyev, RIA-Novosti, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

When big talk meets action

President Obama was full of talk this week, declaring that as the world’s greatest military power the United States will defeat the Islamic State, also known as ISIS. No argument here. The United States can defeat any enemy it seriously sets out to defeat.

United States President Barack Obama addresses the 70th session of the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters, Monday, Sept. 28, 2015. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

A climate of delusion

President Obama’s globalist rhetoric captured hearts at the United Nations but it will take more than hot air to make global warming cool with anyone but the easily fooled.

Related Articles

Then-Incoming House Minority Leader John Boehner of Ohio, center. (AP Photo/Lawrence Jackson, File)

A speaker for the people

Intramural Republican fights often resemble high school student-body elections, or the way the ladies conduct "roasts" of each other. The point of a roast is to sling witty insults just this side of bad taste. They're usually good fun, even for the roastee. When the ladies do it the "roasts" usually become gentle and lady-like toasts. Some things don't translate.

Blame game: Russian President Vladimir Putin, while bolstering military aid to Syria, said U.S. moves have deepened the ongoing refugee crisis. (Associated Press)

A small victory for Putin

Vladimir Putin can claim a small victory Monday at the United Nations when he sits down with Barack Obama, even if, as the White House suggests, it was the Russian president who asked for the date.

House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, gets emotional during the opening of a ceremony awarding the Congressional Gold Medal to the American Fighter Aces,, Wednesday May 20, 2015, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Exit the speaker, crying

John Boehner's speakership had been on life support for weeks. The only surprise of his resignation was the timing. He obviously saw something bad coming at him. Better to exit crying than to be pushed out fighting.

Chinese President Xi Jinping speaks Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2015, at a banquet in Seattle. Leaders from Michigan to Beijing attended meetings Tuesday with Xi in the U.S. and signed an agreement to work together to advance renewable energy and clean technologies to combat climate change. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

A challenge to President Xi

Little things can mean a lot, but it isn't always easy to decipher exactly what those little things mean. Almost on the eve of Chinese President Xi Jinping's arrival in the United States for an elaborate state visit, something happened over the Yellow Sea, which separates China and the Korean Peninsula.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks during a campaign stop in Baton Rouge, La., on Sept. 21, 2015. (Associated Press)

Hillary in a corner

Anot-so-funny thing is happening to Hillary Clinton on her way to the coronation. By this time she was supposed to be busy getting accustomed to the purple, looking forward to high times next summer at the Democratic National Convention in Tampa.

Secretary of State John Kerry answers a question about the ongoing crisis in Syria during a news conference with British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond, on Saturday, Sept. 19, 2015, in London. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, Pool)

The sum of satire

If there's a market for black satire, Barack Obama and John Kerry have a future in the movies. They have outdone Peter Sellers and George C. Scott in the 1960s dark comedy, "Dr. Strangelove, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb."

President Obama will need to more than double the number of Americans enrolled in Obamacare exchange plans to reach 21 million next year, the target set in budget projections, in what is shaping up as the next major test for the health care law. (Associated Press)

The painful costs of Obamacare

Just when it looked like Obamacare couldn't get worse, new statistical evidence shows that it can, and has. Healthcare insurance is getting more expensive for most workers because of an increase in deductions.

Illustration on Chinese human rights violations by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

A welcome mat for Xi is not deserved

Washington will roll out the red carpet for President Xi Jinping this week. The honor is unwarranted. While President Obama offers toasts to the Chinese leader, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Liu Xiaobo continues to languish in a dark prison.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker pauses as he speaks at a news conference Monday, Sept. 21, 2015, in Madison, Wis., where he announced that he is suspending his Republican presidential campaign. (AP Photo/Morry Gash)

Exit Scott Walker

Six months ago no one would have bet that Rick Perry of Texas or Scott Walker of Wisconsin would have been the first to step off the Republican presidential merry-go-'round. Both looked like authentic contenders.

This Nov. 11, 2014, file photo shows the U.S. Capitol Building illuminated by the setting sun on the National Mall in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

An abiding suspicion of government

Americans have always been skeptical of their federal government. It's in the republic's DNA. The founding fathers even wrote the Second Amendment into the Constitution, just in case. But skepticism in our time has become something close to contempt. The Gallup Poll finds that almost half the country says the United States government is "an immediate threat to the rights and freedoms of ordinary Americans."

The U.S. Navy warship USS John McCain, an Arleigh-Burke class destroyer, is docked at the Subic Freeport to take part in the joint US-Philippines naval exercise  called Cooperation Afloat Readiness And Training (CARAT) at the former US naval base of Subic, about 70 miles west of Manila, Philippines Thursday, June 26, 2014. After more than a decade of helping fight al-Qaida-linked militants, the United States is disbanding an anti-terror contingent of hundreds of elite American troops in the southern Philippines where armed groups such as the Abu Sayyaf have largely been crippled, officials said Thursday. The move reflects shifting security strategies and focus in economically vibrant Asia, where new concerns such as multiple territorial conflicts involving China have alarmed Washington's allies entangled in the disputes. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

A test for the Navy

The U.S. Navy is unique. Now that Britain's Royal Navy, which for centuries enabled Britannia to rule the waves, has declined along with the rest of the empire, America's ships dominate the waves simply because no one can compete in every ocean sea across the globe.

Holy orders: Pope Francis looks out from the Hill of the Cross in Holguin, Cuba, Monday as he entreated the island nation to adapt some of its more conservative views. Francis faces some backlash from U.S. Catholics for his more liberal views on such issues as same-sex unions and climate change. Story A8. (Associated Press)

The naive intentions of Pope Francis

Pope Francis arrives Tuesday to a hearty welcome in the United States, fresh from a triumphant visit to Cuba, where the Castro brothers not only put out a red carpet for him but put on a show of how to suppress dissent. Catholic dissidents to the Castro rule were knocked about by "state security" when they showed up for the mass the pope no doubt intended for all.

A visit by Pope Francis

This is a big week for foreign visitors. Pope Francis, the leader of the Roman Catholic Church, arrives and no sooner leaves Washington than the leader of China comes to town for a state visit. Pomp and circumstance were never so abundant. It's a good week to stay out of the tangle of blocked streets the visits will make of downtown traffic.