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A woman walks past an electronic board of a local bank showing the Hong Kong share index in Hong Kong Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2014. Global stocks sank under the weight of worries about the possible timing of a U.S. rate hike, economic weakness in China and an impending referendum on Scottish independence. Hong Kong's Hang Seng fell 1.9 percent to 24,705.36. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

China’s shaky economy

Three weeks ago shares on the Shanghai stock market fell by nearly a third in value, wiping out $3 trillion in profits. When the cavalry arrived, the Communist Party leaders threw everything they had to stop the hemorrhaging. Capitalism is particularly precious to Communists.

Illustration Gun Free Zone by Greg Groesch for The Washington Times

Gun-free zones that never are

In the land of the blind, as the saying goes, the one-eyed man is king, and in the land of the disarmed the man with a gun is king. America is once more observing what passes for national mourning over the grim work of a nut acting out some sort of bizarre theory about the collapse of society by randomly shooting people.

Tel Aviv has long sought the release of Jonathan Pollard, a former intelligence analyst convicted in 1987 of spying for Israel. He is serving a life sentence. (Associated Press)

Parole for Jonathan Pollard

Close relationships, whether human or nation-to-nation, are always complicated. Almost any Thanksgiving Day dinner table is a demonstration of that, with brothers and sisters and cousins and aunts stepping carefully to avoid spoiling the turkey and spilling the cranberries. So it is with nation-to-nation relationships, too. As close it is, no country-to-country relationship is more complicated than America’s relationship with Israel.

Harry S. Truman

Where is a Democratic barn-burner?

If the Democrats want to be taken seriously, and something more than a party of self-righteous whiners, they must start acting like the party of Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S Truman and John F. Kennedy. All the fun shouldn’t be left to the Republicans. Why should the nation be deprived of a contest for the Democratic nomination for president, the usual cat fight that always invigorated Democratic Party politics?

Robot rights rule!

The season of the Theater of the Absurd continues. After the Supreme Court twisted the clear meaning of plain English words to save Obamacare and bless same-sex marriage, after Iran hoodwinked Barack Obama into preserving and expanding its nuclear program, after Bruce Jenner remade himself (herself? itself?) into a buxom synthetic female, no one should be surprised when R2D2 wakes up to demand his civil rights, too. This might not be what Mr. Obama had in mind, but a conscientious radical accepts everything new, bad or not.

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Secretary of State John Kerry. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Facing the devil in the details

The details of President Obama's deal with Iran continue to leak, like muddy water from a bucket left to rust in the weeds. Several congressmen who lately called on the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna learned that there are secret "protocols" to the agreement Mr. Obama made with the mullahs of Tehran. Mr. Obama and the talking heads on television argue lamely that this is "always the way with such undertakings."

Illustration on the evils of Planned Parenthood by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Rotten to the core

The late Richard Pryor obviously wrote the defense used by the wonderful folks at Planned Parenthood, whose senior executives got caught on camera, twice, haggling over the price of the body parts -- lungs, livers, brains -- lifted from the bodies of unborn babies.

A voter can be seen in a voting booth Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014 in Honolulu.  Despite the rains and winds from Tropical Storm Iselle that pounded the state Friday, Hawaii will hold primary elections today.  (AP Photo/Marco Garcia)

Keeping the ballot secure

"Your vote counts" is a snappy slogan just short enough to fit on a lapel button, but snappy is not the same as "secure." As the 2016 campaign unfolds, there's renewed interest in enabling voters to vote over the Internet. The notion that choosing a president could be as easy as using a smartphone to order a pizza is tempting to some, but until cybersecurity wizards prove that a vote cast is a vote counted, Internet balloting is unreliably risky.

No haircut for the First Amendment

Once upon a time, the idea of giving the First Amendment a haircut never occurred to anyone. The constitutional guarantee of free speech was held to be the cornerstone of the unique American experiment in government of the people, by the people, and for the people. The Founding Fathers wrote it, plain, direct and so unambiguous that even a United States senator could understand it.

Liz Sullivan, mother of Kathryn Steinle, is consoled by Sabine Durden as she cries during the testimony of Kathryn's father Jim Steinle during a Senate Judiciary hearing in Washington on Tuesday. The family told Congress they support changing the laws that allowed her alleged killer to remain in the United States despite being deported several times. (Associated Press)

No sanctuary for lawbreakers

There's bad immigration news, but it's leavened by news that is a little better. The bad news is that the Center for Immigration Studies puts the number of illegal aliens crossing the border by the seventh year of the Obama administration at 2.5 million. The better news is that the number of illegals swarming to the United States has leveled off, owing to hundreds of thousands who have gone home. Arrivals and departures are now about even.

The Times Square military recruiting station displays insignia for each military branch, Friday, July 17, 2015, in New York.  Security at military recruiting and reserve centers will be reviewed in the aftermath of a deadly shooting in Tennessee. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

Give the soldiers a gun

The attacks on military recruiting offices continue because they're attractive targets for terrorists and they are, by necessity, located in vulnerable places. They're placed in high traffic areas so they will be highly visible -- they're intended to attract attention -- and they're staffed by soldiers, sailors and Marines shorn of the weapons they're trained to use.

President Obama asked Americans to wait for more facts about the Chattanooga shootings, and did not use the word "terror" to describe the attack. (Associated Press)

Obama takes his deal to the U.N.

President Obama got the endorsement of his Iranian "deal" Monday that probably means the most to him, a unanimous vote by the United Nations Security Council. Samantha Power, the U.S. ambassador to the U.N, and Gholamali Khoshroo, the Iranian ambassador the U.N., fell over each other to get up to say what a terrific occasion the day was.

Daly Simmons, 26, sits as she prays in front of a makeshift memorial outside the Armed Forces Career Center Saturday, July 18, 2015, in Chattanooga, Tenn.    Muhammad Youssef Abdulazeez, of Hixson, Tenn., attacked two military facilities on Thursday, in a shooting rampage that killed four Marines and one U.S. Navy sailor.  (AP Photo/Mark Zaleski)

A call to arms

Chattanooga joins Fort Hood and Little Rock as indictments of the continuing failure of the nation's strategy for eliminating the threat of Islamic terrorism. The man entrusted with the responsibility for keeping America safe won't even call the threat by its right name. Hint: It's not "workplace violence."

Dinesh D'Souza. ** FILE **

The deprogramming of Dinesh D'Souza

Arrogance is ugly wherever found, and it's particularly ugly in a judge with the power to deprive a man of his freedom. Dinesh D'Souza is an author, filmmaker and onetime college president who was convicted of violating campaign finance law.

President Barack Obama speaks in the Choctaw Nation on economic opportunities for underprivileged communities across the nation, on Wednesday, July 15, 2015, in Durant, Okla. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

President Obama's hissy fit

There is not a lot to love in President Obama's nuclear deal with Iran, despite the attempted assurances in his what's-not-to-like press conference on Wednesday. In addition to the near-unanimous doubts about his "air-tight verification" promises, which he insists make a nuclear arms race in the Middle East less likely, a short list of what's wrong with the deal must include the names of four Americans: Jason Rezaian, Saeed Abedini, Amir Hekmati and Robert Levinson. They're American hostages in Iran, and they just lost their best chance for freedom. Mr. Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry apparently "forgot" to press for their release.

Russian President Vladimir Putin. (Associated Press)

Kiev 2015, Madrid 1936

All historical analogies are odious, some dead white man has written somewhere. It's true that comparisons from one era to another are obviously false because the facts and conditions may be different. They always are.

 Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Director Katherine Archuleta testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington in June. FILE (Associated Press)

Closing the barn door

Katherine Archuleta's resignation as director of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management was inevitable, even in an administration with an easy tolerance of incompetence. On her watch, hackers, probably working for the Chinese, opened doors in cyberspace enabling access to millions of confidential files of current and former government employees.