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President Barack Obama speaks at the launch of My Brother's Keeper Alliance at Lehman College in the Bronx borough of New York, Monday, May 4, 2015. My Brother's Keeper Alliance is an outgrowth of Obama's year-old My Brother's Keeper initiative, which has focused on federal government policies and grants designed to increase access to education and jobs. (Susan Watts/The Daily News via AP, Pool)

A trap for Mr. Obama’s negotiators

President Obama and his negotiators talking to Iran frighten the rest of us not only for what they’re willing to accept as a deal, but for the way they negotiate. They clearly don’t understand how to negotiate with rogues.

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon delivers his speech during a press conference with French President Francois Hollande at the Elysee Palace in Paris, France, Wednesday, April 29, 2015. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

Platitudes, bromides and ‘tipping points’

Cliches get attention, and fearmongers have christened a new one that’s already turning credulous heads: “Tipping point.” There are so many warnings about the danger of climate change tipping the balance of nature that to hear the “experts” tell it, Planet Earth has become one large canoe.

The North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un does not appear interested in holding sincere talks on giving up his nuclear arms. (Associated Press)

The powder keg in Northeast Asia

The world’s attention is focused on the chaos of the Middle East, but a time bomb is ticking in northeast Asia. Mysterious, heavily armed North Korea is a threat that at the moment seems out of sight, but it cannot be out of mind.

Demonstrators cheer in the intersection of West North and Pennsylvania Avenues in Baltimore on Saturday, May 2, 2015, one of the sites of Monday's rioting, as they march a day after charges were announced against the police officers involved in Freddie Gray's death. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Sticks, stones and thugs

The reputation of the police in Baltimore has taken a beating in the wake of the rioting. Six policemen have been charged with crimes, though it is important to remember that they are charged — not indicted, and not yet convicted of anything. Nevertheless, some people with nothing better to do are eager to dispatch the Word Police to make further arrests.

Scotland's First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon, delivers a keynote speech during a press conference in Glasgow, Scotland, as the Scottish National Party leader insisted Wednesday April 29, 2015, that the General Election is "not about independence" for the party. Britain goes to the polls in a General Election on May 7. (Danny Lawson/PA via AP) UNITED KINGDOM OUT  NO SALES  NO ARCHIVE

Scots wha hae!

Voters in Britain go to the polls again next week, and our correspondents say the race is too close to call. Scotland, which rejected independence in a bitterly fought referendum only six months ago, may hold the key to whether the Labor Party replaces the Conservatives to govern the United Kingdom.

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FILE - In this June 15, 2012, file photo, a group of tourists from China take in the sights of the New York Stock Exchange and Federal Hall National Memorial, in New York. Chinese tourists, already among the fastest-growing and highest-spending groups of international visitors to the United States, are poised to make an even bigger impact, thanks to a rule change that would allow visitors to get visas valid for 10 years. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

The Ugly Chinese

In times more innocent than these, Eugene Burdick and William J. Lederer wrote a best-seller, "The Ugly American," circa 1958, about a well-meaning American bureaucrat who set out to repeat the success of the Marshall Plan in what were accurately called, with no intention of hurting anyone's feelings, "the undeveloped countries." Good intentions were not enough. The new plan didn't work, foiled by hubris and pretension in the new class of American bureaucrats. The unattractive hero understood, but couldn't turn the tide. He was dismissed as "the Ugly American" of his book.

A U.S. Coast Guard helicopter flies over natural gas rigs in the waters of Mobile Bay off Dauphin Island, Ala., Sunday, April 26, 2015. Coast Guard crews are searching for five people missing in the water after a powerful storm capsized several sailboats participating in a regatta near Mobile Bay. (AP Photo/G.M. Andrews)

American ingenuity hits a gusher

You wouldn't know it from all the hot air from the government, but American entrepreneurs, with little help from Washington, have ignited a worldwide energy revolution. They have done it despite of the efforts of the ideologues who prescribe an altogether different energy strategy.

President Barack Obama rides in the presidential limousines at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., Wednesday, April 29, 2015, for a visit with wounded military personnel. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Saving Baltimore

Barack Obama is a symbol of black pride, and why wouldn't he be? He was elected president of the United States twice. But as a president who has not done very much for black America, he has been a disaster. The riots that have ripped through Baltimore in recent days are more an indictment of his willfully failed leadership than as a marker of the state of race relations in the United States.

Anti-GMO just anti-science

Chipotle's recent GMO-free announcement confirms a disturbing trend: the inescapable appeal of anti-scientism in executive boardrooms. It's really just business as usual — an extension of a campaign that reduces farming to laughable caricatures and elevates Chipotle's "wholesome" brand.

Yong Soo Lee, of South Korea is seen of the West Lawn of the Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 28, 2015. Yong Soo Lee is one of dozens of surviving comfort women from Korea other Asian countries that were forced into sexual servitude by Japanese troops. (AP Photo/Luis M. Alvarez)

Justice for the ‘comfort women’

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who speaks to a joint session of Congress on Wednesday, and the Japanese government have heard many demands for apologies for atrocities committed by Japanese soldiers in World War II, and among the most deserving are from the thousands of women, mostly Korean, who were pressed into sexual slavery to serve the lusts of Japanese troops during World War II.

FILE - In this Oct. 28, 2006 file photo, then-Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, D-N.Y., speaks at a benefit gala for the Clinton Foundation at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Clinton is tapping some of the biggest donors to her family's philanthropy for her presidential campaign, even as the charity is under scrutiny over its own fundraising practices. Starting what could be a $1 billion-plus fundraising effort, Clinton began raising money for her presidential bid Tuesday in New York, the state she represented in the Senate. The hosts’ connections with the Clinton Foundation show how intertwined the charity is with Clinton’s political career. Even her campaign finance director, Dennis Cheng, was a leading fundraiser role at the foundation before departing for the campaign. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow, File)

Closing in on Hillary

Americans are a tolerant lot, most of the time, but suspicion of foreigners trying to intervene in things that are none of their business is a constant in the nation's history. On leaving the presidency after two terms, George Washington warned in his farewell address of the wisdom of staying clear of foreign entanglements.

GOP party of choice, freedom

There has been a lot of talk lately about Bruce Jenner coming out as a Republican and a Christian ("Bruce Jenner, Evolving Republican," Web, April 27). Some say they don't want him in our party while others welcome him. Good governance is beneficial to all groups.

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser wants footage from the Metropolitan Police Department's expanding body camera program to be exempt from public records requests, making the District one of an increasing number of jurisdictions trying to limit access in order to balance the technology with privacy concerns. (Associated Press)

Caution with the body cameras

Every picture tells a story, but not every story must be told. Equipping the police with body cameras could hold them more accountable for how they deal with the public. Police departments generally support the idea of such cameras, saying video can protect them from false claims of police brutality. But the unblinking eye is no cure-all and the benefits must be weighed against cost, officer retention and privacy rights. If a police camera becomes part of the uniform, one size may not fit all.

President Barack Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe visit the Lincoln Memorial on the National Mall in Washington, Monday, April 27, 2015. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

An ambitious visitor from Japan

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of Japan will be honored Wednesday in a way that few foreign visitors are honored. He will speak to a joint session of Congress, and in an irony that will not go unremarked either here or in Japan, he will speak from the lectern used by President Franklin D. Roosevelt when he asked Congress to declare war on Japan the day after the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, the date that FDR said "will live in infamy."

Applaud Bruce Jenner's courage

As a Christian, Republican and transgender individual, Bruce Jenner demonstrates that the conservative umbrella is just as diverse and inclusive as its squawking liberal counterpart ("Bruce Jenner: I'm a Republican and a Christian," Web, April 25). Today gay conservative voices — most notably Washington Times columnist Tammy Bruce — champion the truth that the Republican party has evolved to a greater degree of social acceptance.

President Barack Obama laughs at a joke during the White House Correspondents' Association dinner at the Washington Hilton on Saturday, April 25, 2015, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

The liberation of President Obama

President Obama obviously feels liberated by the sight of his administration swiftly approaching the outer suburbs of oblivion. With no fear of red line or deadline, he has set about to use the time he has left in office to make the United States a nation that neither he nor Michelle would be ashamed to be proud of.

FILE - In this Tuesday, April 21, 2015 file photo, Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks to students and faculty during a campaign stop at New Hampshire Technical Institute in Concord, N.H. The acting chief executive of the Clinton Foundation is acknowledging the global philanthropy made mistakes in how it disclosed its donors amid growing scrutiny as Hillary Rodham Clinton opens her presidential campaign, Sunday, April 26, 2015. (AP Photo/Jim Cole, File)

A ’bot with a rap sheet

Sometimes the news sounds like science fiction by Ray Bradbury. We've been asked by a high government official, lately in charge of the State Department, to believe that certain of her emails reside in a black hole in cyberspace. Two scientists — computer geeks, anyway — are working on a computer program to bring a dead man back as a virtual live man for a virtual conversation.

In this Dec. 7, 2005 file photo, former South African President, Nelson Mandela, smiles at the Mandela Foundation in Johannesburg. The former political prisoner who became the country's first black president in 1994 died in December 2013 at the age of 95. Pan Macmillan said Tuesday, March 24, 2015, that it will publish the sequel to Mandela's best-selling autobiography "Long Walk to Freedom" in Britain, South Africa, India and Australasia in 2016. U.S. and Canadian rights have not yet been sold. (AP Photo/Denis Farrell)

Dreams of children of angry fathers

Most Americans can't quite understand how events of previous centuries still have the power to stir anger and resentments, and make an appreciation of their common interests difficult. Well, some Americans can recall a certain anger late on a summer night after a third or even fourth bourbon and branch water, but the feeling quickly goes away. Nations, after all, do not have permanent friends, in Lord Palmerston's famous explanation to Queen Victoria, but nations do have permanent interests and memories of a civil war no longer poisons those interests on these shores.