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Ali Khamenei, the mullah who is the supreme leader of Iran, tells his Twitter followers that "This barbaric, wolflike & infanticidal regime of #Israel which spares no crime has no cure but to be annihilated." (AP Photo/Office of the Iranian Supreme Leader, File)

Playing the fool’s game

The clock is ticking on efforts to halt Iran’s quest for the bomb, and time is running out. When it does, the folly of allowing a rogue state to threaten the Middle East — and the world — with the bomb will be exposed in stark and horrifying relief. Neville Chamberlain was the face of appeasement in the 20th century; Barack Obama would be that face in the 21st.

A college or university degree is not the only route to happiness and success. (AP Photo/Susanne Schafer)

The community college illusion

Two years at a “free” community college may seem appealing to young people, fearful of the future and looking for a route to prosperity, but they will be the first to feel disappointment in President Obama’s illusionary community-college-for-all scheme. His proposed $60 billion educational subsidy will inevitably diminish the quality of faculties, prevent promising students from obtaining a suitable education, and do little to provide an entryway into the job market. A college or university degree is not the only route to happiness and success.

Two years after Obamacare opened for business, Mr. Obama's health care scheme isn't exactly solving the problem every American must deal with. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

Doubling down on disaster

President Obama is for choice and competition in the health-insurance market, as befits a champion of the free market, except when he isn’t. “My guiding principle is, and always has been,” he said in 2009 when he was trying to sell Obamacare, “that consumers do better when there is choice and competition. That’s how the market works. In Alabama, almost 90 percent of the market is controlled by just one company. And without competition, the price of insurance goes up and quality goes down.”

Gov. Terry McAuliffe, the new Democratic governor, no fan of the civility-in-government movement, calls Mr. Black's measure "counterproductive and mean-spirited" and had threatened to veto it if the legislation passed. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Breaking the law is no solution

No one would reward a shoplifter just because he manages to get out of the store with stolen merchandise, but every Democrat in the Virginia state Senate — and one Republican — voted last week to reward those who broke into the country illegally and get a valuable public benefit.

President Obama gives his State of the Union address before a joint session of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015 (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Three cheers for gridlock

Gridlock became a dirty word in Washington after the Republicans regained the majority in the House of Representatives and stood in the path of the invader from Fantasy Island, shouting “Stop!” The president wanted a rubber stamp, and the Democrats agreed, demanding of the Republicans, “Why can’t you be like us?”

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Many communities across America have government-owned golf courses that compete against privately owned courses. The government courses are usually inferior to private courses, and are costly to maintain besides.  (AP Photo/Kalamazoo Gazette-MLive Media Group, Mark Bugnaski) ALL LOCAL TELEVISION OUT; LOCAL TELEVISION INTERNET OUT

Nothing beats the private economy

In his book, "Myths, Lies and Downright Stupidity," John Stossel of Fox News bet his readers a thousand dollars that they couldn't name one thing the government does better than the private sector. Eight years later he hasn't had to pay anyone a dime. The government just doesn't have the motivation, or the spur of competition, to perform services as well as private business.

President Barack Obama waves before giving his State of the Union address before a joint session of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015 (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

The state of the president

The Constitution requires presidents to provide Congress with periodic information on the "state of the union" and President George Washington delivered the required information in a speech to a joint session of Congress in 1790. That turned out to be an unfortunate precedent. Most of his successors haven't been able to resist making it an occasion for a speech, either.

Chips off the block

Credit card fraud is everybody's headache. If the hackers haven't got to you yet, they will. There's a new weapon against the hackers, called "chip-and-PIN technology," but replacing a billion credit cards is expensive and some of the big banks are reluctant to put out the millions (and millions) of dollars to pay for it. The federal government is using chip-and-PIN cards but not many private users in the United States have access to it.

This undated image posted online and made available on Thursday, Nov. 20, 2014 by Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered Silently, an anti-Islamic State group organization, shows children at an Islamic State group training camp in Raqqa, Syria. The image has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting. Across the vast region in Syria and Iraq that is part of the Islamic State group's self-declared caliphate, children are being inculcated with the extremist group's radical and violent interpretation of Shariah law. (AP Photo/Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered Silently)

When children are expendable

If children are the future, the terrorists who ravish and ravage the young in pursuit of empire portend a very bleak future in the benighted lands. Evil men continue to poison the young with the venom and bile that describe the distortions of their religion. The world stands aghast and incredulous at the violence visited upon the innocent, and at the reluctance to judge another's faith that is the mark of American tolerance. The fear of reprisal restrains many Muslims from condemning acts they know are atrocities. There is no holy writ anywhere to excuse using children as fodder for cannon. No one's God is that cynical.

Micheal Mpubane leads a Bible study at the Progressive Primary in Johannesburg. Poor South Africans are underserved by a government that has struggled to close the gap apartheid created between white and black public schools. (Associated Press)

Learning in unexpected places

"Education for all" was set as a worldwide priority by the United Nations in 1990, to be accomplished in 25 years. The deadline is upon us and billions of dollars later, UNESCO, the cultural arm of the U.N., says there are still 175 million children in the developing world who can't read or write. This is taken as proof at the U.N. that governments must "intensify their efforts," meaning they must "intensify" the spending of more money. The facts tell a different story.

The president goes to war

President Obama has gone to war. But not with the Islamic State group, Iran, North Korea or any foreign threat. Mr. Obama, at the urging of environmental extremists, has declared war on America's oil and natural gas producers. His weapon of choice is a new Environmental Protection Agency regulation to cut methane emissions by up to 45 percent by 2025.

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (Associated Press) **FILE**

Putting spice in marriage

The language of the New Age, like a lot of things in Li'l Abner's hometown of Dogpatch, can be "amusin' but confusin'." The word "sex" has been displaced by "gender," though no one ever called Marilyn Monroe a "genderpot," and no woman we know thinks a silky black night gown will make her feel "gendery." Gov. Terry McAuliffe of Virginia thinks he can ride to the rescue of all by making the language of marriage more confusing, if not amusing.

Men walk by a sign in Chattanooga, Tenn., promoting it as Gig City. The city's municipal fiber optic network provides Internet speeds at more than 50 times the national average. (AP Photo/Erik Schelzig)

The wrong way to a good idea

President Obama has set out to do for the Internet what he did for the nation's health care system. He's determined to destroy the Internet, which has changed the way the world works, as we know it.

 (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Flunking Econ 101

Julia lives. Everybody is trying to forget Julia, President Obama's campaign cartoon figure from his 2012 re-election campaign. "The Life of Julia" touted the advantages of cradle-to-grave federal munificence, from universal pre-kindergarten classes for toddlers to Obamacare for everybody. "Julia" might have been called a celebration of womb-to-tomb munificence, except that a shower of contraceptives and abortions under Obamacare would mean that prospective descendants of Julia would never make it out of the womb.

Securing the border first is a sound idea: This fence marks the U.S.-Mexico border at El Calaboz, Texas. (Associated press)

Stopping jihad in America

The terrorist attacks on France are a reminder that the broken U.S. immigration system isn't just about saving American jobs, but keeping out terrorists who are itching to make similar attacks in America. In the wake of the Paris attacks that killed 17 men and women last week, security officials have warned that the United States is a target for mayhem, too. President Obama's relentless determination to open the nation's borders to just about everyone makes it considerably easier for the Islamic jihadis to prepare a strike. We shouldn't need a violent episode here to remind everyone that a nation that won't control its border is no nation at all.

FILE - This Aug. 13, 2014 photo shows an array of mirrors at the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating site in Primm, Nev. The largest solar power plant of its type in the world, promoted as a turning point in green energy, isn’t producing the expected energy and one of the reasons is as basic as it gets: The sun isn’t shining as often as expected. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)

Where the sun doesn’t shine

Solar panels are one of the favorite hopes on the left for clean and renewable, energy. The evangelists for the sun claim that solar power capacity will double this year, and point out to the credulous that government programs offer tax breaks and incentives to encourage Americans to put up solar panels, and government-funded solar farms, like California's Ivanpah facility, are popping up like mushrooms (which actually prefer dark places) across the country.

In this March 11, 2013 file photo is a sign reading "Stop the Transcanada Pipeline" placed in a field near Bradshaw, Neb. Even if the Republican-led Congress approves the Keystone XL pipeline, not a drop of oil will flow through the system until Nebraska signs off on its route. The routing process is still before the state Supreme Court, and depending on how justices rule, it could be months or longer before any construction in Nebraska begins. (Associated Press)

Taking a vow of poverty

Cursing the darkness may be more satisfying than lighting a candle, but it ultimately keeps everyone in the dark. President Obama vows to veto construction of the Keystone XL pipeline, which the House approved by a wide margin on Friday. His steadfast opposition to the energy conduit from Canada places him squarely in league with those who measure human progress only with a thermometer.