Political Editorials - Washington Times
Skip to content

Editorials

Featured Articles

Former U.S. President Barack Obama (Associated Press)

Mon Dieu! President Obama of France

A month out of the White House, and Barack Obama is still looking for work. Fortunately, there may be a France in his future. A group of merry pranksters in Paris is circulating a petition to get him on the ballot as a candidate for president in the round of elections beginning in April.

Morris Dees of the Southern Poverty Law Center (Associated Press)

Selling an epidemic

Some of the shills on the left lament “an epidemic of hate out there, and it’s about to drown the republic.” The contagion has spread like wildfire, which stretches cliche to a breaking point, and according to the usual jeremiahs on the left it all started with Donald Trump.

Protesters hold signs during a rally in support of transgender youth, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017, at the Stonewall National Monument in New York. They were demonstrating against President Donald Trump's decision to roll back a federal rule saying public schools had to allow transgender students to use the bathrooms and locker rooms of their chosen gender identity. The rule had already been blocked from enforcement, but transgender advocates view the Trump administration action as a step back for transgender rights. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

Free-for-all at the urinal

A visitor from Mars or Pluto could reasonably conclude that Earth is a weird planet indeed. “It’s a heavenly body of great beauty,” he might report back to headquarters, “where everyone is trying to change his and her sex but is so squeamish about talking about sex that they must coin euphemisms, such as ‘gender identity,’ to describe it.”

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting on domestic and international human trafficking, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017,in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

The comeback of coal

President Trump’s boisterous press conferences sometimes cast a shadow over one of his most important achievements so far: his executive order suspending runaway Environmental Protection Agency rules that all but bankrupted the American coal industry. Three of America’s largest coal companies declared Chapter 11 in recent years largely as a result of rules like the Clean Power Plant Act, a gift of Barack Obama.

FILE - In this Feb. 15, 2017 file photo, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington before the House Financial Services Committee for the Fed's semi-annual Monetary Policy Report to Congress.  Federal Reserve officials earlier this month discussed the need to raise a key interest rate again "fairly soon," especially if the economy remains strong. Minutes of the discussions in minutes released Wednesday, Feb. 22  showed that while Fed officials decided to keep a key rate unchanged at their Jan. 31-Feb. 1 meeting, there was growing concern about what could happen to inflation if the economy out-performed expectations. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The regulator cometh, and maybe goeth

There’s a lot to be said about government regulation — and much of it not good. Some regulation, given that human nature is what it is, is necessary. But sometimes it seems there’s little difference between the government telling you how to spend your money and the government just taking it. Regulations are a lot like taxes.

Related Articles

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump smiles during a campaign rally at the Delaware County Fair, Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016, in Delaware, Ohio. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

The debt to Donald Trump

Donald Trump and his regiments marched out of Las Vegas Thursday morning in high spirits. Maybe they were just whistling past that famous graveyard where hopes go to die. Or maybe not. Some post-debate polls show the race still tied, and if that's true the debate changed very little. There's still the election, to settle the dispute once and for all, or at least until 2020. (That campaign begins Nov. 9.)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, center, accompanied by Campaign Manager Robby Mook, left, and traveling press secretary Nick Merrill, right, smiles as she speaks with members of the media aboard her campaign plane at McCarran International Airport in Las Vegas, Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016, following the third presidential debate. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Hillary and the buck

With so many campaign reporters in the tank with her, eager for a little warm and cuddly, Hillary Clinton's fear of talking to them is a puzzle. She can be sure of not getting very many tough questions, and her answers will be carefully presented to an unsuspecting reader/viewership. They all share the same assignment, to destroy the Donald.

A marijuana harvester examines a bud that is going through a trimming machine in a rural area near Corvallis, Ore., Sept. 30, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Selsky)

Pot on the ballot

When the topic is illicit drugs, a two-way conversation can generate three opinions (or more). A disjointed nationwide discussion is underway over the benefits and dangers of marijuana that will rattle at the ballot box on Nov. 8. Whether they vote to join the current crop of tokers or to stand firm for smoke-free sobriety, Americans in several states can't claim to be clueless about the consequences of the high life. It's already here.

Swapping the myths

The enduring American political parties have always been coalitions. The country is too big and populous, with too many strong regional and other economic demands to meet the models of European-style ideological political configurations.

Wary of how the press treats Donald Trump, Republicans have the least amount of trust in the media, a Gallup poll finds. (Associated press) **FILE**

Polls all over the place

Nobody's any longer paying serious attention to "the issues," unless the Donald's sex tape and Hillary's felonies and misdemeanors qualify as issues. Hillary naturally gets a pass, either because the media has decided that her crimes are old news or, more likely, trashy behavior is what everyone now expects from the Clintons. Besides, what's wrong with trashy behavior?

In this June 28, 2016 photo, the Sheridan Press Child care provider Nancy Weaver holds Klayton Pearce as she keeps a toddler from pulling an object from a cubby hole at the Tongue River Child's Place in Ranchester, Wyo. Staff at the facility have been working with 4Kids on training as part of a pilot program. (Justin Sheely/Sheridan Press via AP)

It doesn't take a village

Raising children has never been more challenging. Just ask the new mother who drops off her crying six-week-old infant at a child care center, drying her tears, because she can't afford to stay home with her baby.

A young boy tags along at a voting booth as early voting beings at the Hamilton County Board of Elections, Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

All voters matter

The Democrats, who imagine they have the franchise on ethics in politics, have argued for years that there's no such thing as voter fraud, and anyone who says that such wickedness exists is a racist in a small closet who ventures out from time to time to keep minority voters, i.e., blacks, from voting.

Hillary, Donald and the greater good

The 2016 presidential election season has not been kind to values voters. It's hard to imagine how America can recapture its place as "a shining city on hill" when most campaign coverage is about sex, lies and videotape. Values voters may be tempted to tune out in disgust and stay home on Election Day, but they have an obligation to weigh necessity against their wishes.

I Prefer Trump Campaign Button Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Decision time at hand

The passionately courted undecided voter is beginning to wake up to the hard fact that soon he must make a choice. Will he stay home on election day, looking for the Prohibition or Vegetarian Party candidate, or swallow hard and choose between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. Many — most, if the polls are right — will ultimately vote with far less enthusiasm than they ever expected to do. There's a widely held view among politicians that most of the citizens have a realistic view of human nature and vote "against" rather than "for," and if that's true this is the year that proves it.

FILE - In this Oct. 14, 2016 file photo, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to volunteers at a campaign office in Seattle. Hillary Clinton has a tight grip on the Electoral College majority need to be elected president of the U.S., and may very well be on her way to a big victory, and that's how some Republicans see it.  (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

The vast left-wing media consensus

The WikiLeaks disclosures, coming now on a daily basis, are such interesting reading that agents of the Clinton campaign are working overtime to divert attention from them, particularly the revelations in the emails of the campaign manager, John Podesta. Hillary insists that the hacking of his email account was sponsored, directed or financed by Vladimir Putin, who in this telling even rewrote them to reflect badly on both Mr. Podesta and Hillary. There's no evidence of Russian connivance, just speculation.

Campaign buttons in support of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump rest on a vendor table before a campaign rally at US Bank Arena, Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

The partisans in the tall weeds

There's nothing quite as sad as watching grown men racing for the tall grass in the face of difficulty and danger. The Republican elites panicked by the disclosure that Donald Trump said something gross -- even if not necessarily as gross as some of the things attributed to JFK and LBJ and Bill Clinton -- should remember what Donald Rumsfeld, who was then the secretary of Defense, said during the first Gulf War.

A member of the audience holds up a mask depicting Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton as she speaks at a rally at the Colorado State Fairgrounds in Pueblo, Colo., Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016, to attend a rally. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Hypocrisy and Hillary

If Hillary Clinton and hypocrisy are not exactly synonymous, they share the same web address. The WikiLeaks cache of emails containing excerpts of her paid speeches to private donors and organizations demonstrate that every time she opens her mouth, out comes cant.

President Barack Obama gestures as he speaks during a reception for Hispanic Heritage Month in the East Room of the White House, Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016, in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Secrets from the closets of skeletons

Hacking files of other people is not nice, and if the FBI finds out who's doing it the perps should be punished, even if they're Russians, and severely. But we're nevertheless learning some interesting things in the WikiLeaks disclosures. This sudden mania for disclosure of bad language and naughty behavior encourages others to contribute entertaining and embarrassing videos.

This Jan. 14, 2015 file photo shows Yahoo's headquarters in Sunnyvale, Calif.  (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

Boo-boo by Yahoo

Freedom, among other good things, is the right to be left in peace. But with privacy under assault, it's a right frequently and eagerly trampled. With many of their personal transactions conducted online, Americans are learning that their private business is being vacuumed up without their knowledge.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton poses for photos after speaking at a rally at Miami Dade College in Miami, Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2016. (Mike Stocker/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)

Hillary in her own words

Nobody much trusts Hillary Clinton. The public-opinion polls have shown that for months. Even her supporters concede that she's self-centered and given to patronize nearly everybody — Donald Trump-like, you might say. Millions of Americans just don't like her. Pity the country with a leader whom nobody likes or trusts.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally, Monday, Oct. 10, 2016, in Ambridge, Pa. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

The real 'P' word is policy, Stupid

Only the blind couldn't see this coming. Hillary Clinton's primary claim to the White House has always been about sex: "It's time for a woman in the White House." Her most loyal constituency is the feminist movement. She would need an October surprise that would play a female card with devastating consequences, to sway uncommitted women to seal her victory. She found the card, played it, and the election still hangs in the balance.

In this Sept. 27, 2016, photo, Haitians make their way towards the border crossing in Tijuana, Mexico. U.S. officials say about 5,000 Haitians showed up at San Ysidro from October 2015 through late last month, and Immigration and Customs Enforcement Director Sarah Saldana said at a recent congressional hearing that officials told her on a trip to Central America that 40,000 more were on their way. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

When the border door is put ajar

The nation hardly faces the threat that Abraham Lincoln beheld when, referring to the angst over slavery, he said "a house divided against itself cannot stand." The survival of the union was at stake. But the front door to the union has been deliberately put open by President Obama, and that's danger enough.