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Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks before a joint meeting of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 3, 2015. In a speech that stirred political intrigue in two countries, Netanyahu told Congress that negotiations underway between Iran and the U.S. would "all but guarantee" that Tehran will get nuclear weapons, a step that the world must avoid at all costs. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

The Netanyahu speech

Benjamin Netanyahu knocked one out of the park Tuesday, and once it cleared the fence the ball beaned a man lurking in the shadows, and bounced into the tall grass. That man in the shadows looked a lot like President Obama.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

Unhappy days in Chicago

Rahm Emanuel was born in Chicago and has been a very favorite son. The Daley machine sent him to Congress, where he was a faithful liege of Bill Clinton, was President Obama’s first chief of staff, got rich working his connections to Wall Street, joined the looting of the federal housing program and returned to his hometown to be elected mayor in 2012. Mr. Emanuel once described his job as mayor as the culmination of a lifelong dream, and said, “I’m loving doing this.”

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu gestures while speaking at the 2015 American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) Policy Conference in Washington, Monday, March 2, 2015. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

The world in peril

Protocol is a valuable tool of diplomacy, but protocol must defer to harsh reality when a nation’s survival is at stake. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu stepped on protocol and President Obama’s toes when he accepted the invitation of Speaker John A. Boehner to speak to the House of Representatives without the customary endorsement of the White House. We say, good for him.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker speaks at the winter meeting of the free market Club for Growth winter economic conference at the Breakers Hotel Saturday, Feb. 28, 2015, in Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/Joe Skipper) ** FILE **

A smear evaporates

Scott Walker had a very good week. He was the star of the beauty contest at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC), and the price and proof of his good fortune was the flak he took from the activists and operatives of the left and the magpies of the media. The Wisconsin governor, so the story went, is oblivious of “gender assaults” on campus.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker speaks at the winter meeting of the free market Club for Growth winter economic conference at the Breakers Hotel Saturday, Feb. 28, 2015, in Palm Beach, Fla.  (AP Photo/Joe Skipper)

Worker freedom grows in Wisconsin

Wisconsin may soon become the 25th state to adopt a right-to-work law, to guarantee that no worker can be compelled to join a union or to pay dues to a union. The state senate narrowly approved the legislation last week (by a vote of 17 to 15) and the bill is moving through the lower house. Gov. Scott Walker, who co-sponsored right-to-work legislation when he was a member of the legislature, says he will sign the legislation if it makes it to his desk.

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** FILE ** Sen. Harry Reid. (Associated Press)

EDITORIAL: Harry Reid's last hurrah

Congress will convene soon as a convention of lame ducks, and ducks usually don't do much. Five senators who were just escorted to the door will have the opportunity to cast one last vote for Harry Reid. The Republicans should know better than to allow these disgruntled few to make mischief. They'll clock out at the first opportunity.

In this Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014, file photo, former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg smiles prior to be conferred with the Chevalier de la Legion d'Honneur by France's Foreign minister Laurent Fabius, at the Quai d'Orsay, in Paris. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus, File)

EDITORIAL: Bloomberg's wasted millions

Mike Bloomberg put $50 million into Tuesday's elections, and he doesn't have much to show for it. Someone, perhaps the Koch brothers, ought to treat him to a Big Gulp. The onetime mayor of New York City organized a group called Everytown for Gun Safety, meant to rival the National Rifle Association, and with a lot more money. The new group was supposed to put gun control on the front burner. Instead, the gun-control candidates got scorched on the back burner.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., celebrates with his supporters at an election night party in Louisville, Ky.,Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014. McConnell won a sixth term in Washington, with his eyes on the larger prize of GOP control of the Senate. The Kentucky U.S. Senate race, with McConnell, a 30-year incumbent, fighting off a spirited challenge from Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes, has been among the most combative and closely watched contests that could determine the balance of power in Congress. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

EDITORIAL: Now, to lead

Midterm elections are about incumbent presidents even when they aren't on the ballot. President Obama acknowledged this when he declared that "every single one" of his policies would be up for a vote Tuesday even though his name wouldn't be on anybody's ballot. On election eve, the White House hedged with the claim that since many of the closest Senate races were in states Mr. Obama didn't carry two years ago the results had to be taken with salt.

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

EDITORIAL: The Republican wave

Pollsters everywhere are wiping egg from their faces, and a lot of the egg is scrambled. They predicted Republicans would have a good night, but their numbers were about as accurate as the television weatherman's 10-day forecast.

A nurse holds a dose of experimental vaccine "cAd3-EBOZ Lau" at the Lausanne University Hospital (CHUV) in Lausanne, Switzerland, Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014. Swissmedic approved the application for a trial with an experimental Ebola vaccine at the Lausanne University Hospital (CHUV). It will be conducted on 120 volunteer participants. The trial continues the series that began in the USA, the UK and Mali. The vaccine, based on a genetically modified chimpanzee adenovirus will initially be administered to healthy volunteers who will be deployed as medical staff in the fight against the Ebola epidemic in West Africa. (AP Photo/Keystone,Jean-Christophe Bott)

EDITORIAL: Beware the Ebola snake-oil remedies

The quality of mercy is always strained, but snake oil comes raw and unfiltered, harvested from ever more lethal snakes. You might think the accounts of the suffering of those stricken with the Ebola virus would soften the hearts of snake-oil salesmen.

FILE - This undated file photo provided by Gilead Sciences shows the hepatitis C medication Sovaldi. Gilead Sciences says it has reached a deal with several generic drugmakers to produce cheaper versions of its popular, expensive hepatitis C drug Sovaldi for use in developing countries. (AP Photo/Courtesy of Gilead Sciences, File)

EDITORIAL: The spreading Obamacare virus

Socialized health care in the United States comes by incrementalism. Obamacare and its exchanges preserve the illusion of a free market for insurance coverage, but we're inching ever closer to the left's dream of "single-payer," a system of one-size-fits-all medical treatment organized by the government.

Rep. Gerry Connolly, D-Va., talks about winning his re-election, at his office in Annandale, Va., on Tuesday, Nov. 9, 2010. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

EDITORIAL: Scholte for Congress

Four years ago, President Obama urged Hispanics to vote to "punish our enemies." The strategy didn't work, and the Democrats lost 63 House seats. Rep. Gerald "Gerry" Connolly of Virginia, a Democrat, nearly became No. 64.