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Two years after Obamacare opened for business, Mr. Obama's health care scheme isn't exactly solving the problem every American must deal with. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

Doubling down on disaster

President Obama is for choice and competition in the health-insurance market, as befits a champion of the free market, except when he isn’t. “My guiding principle is, and always has been,” he said in 2009 when he was trying to sell Obamacare, “that consumers do better when there is choice and competition. That’s how the market works. In Alabama, almost 90 percent of the market is controlled by just one company. And without competition, the price of insurance goes up and quality goes down.”

Gov. Terry McAuliffe, the new Democratic governor, no fan of the civility-in-government movement, calls Mr. Black's measure "counterproductive and mean-spirited" and had threatened to veto it if the legislation passed. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Breaking the law is no solution

No one would reward a shoplifter just because he manages to get out of the store with stolen merchandise, but every Democrat in the Virginia state Senate — and one Republican — voted last week to reward those who broke into the country illegally and get a valuable public benefit.

President Obama gives his State of the Union address before a joint session of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015 (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Three cheers for gridlock

Gridlock became a dirty word in Washington after the Republicans regained the majority in the House of Representatives and stood in the path of the invader from Fantasy Island, shouting “Stop!” The president wanted a rubber stamp, and the Democrats agreed, demanding of the Republicans, “Why can’t you be like us?”

Chloe Kim competes during the women's snowboarding superpipe final at the Dew Tour iON Mountain Championships in Breckenridge, Colo.  (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, File)

Snow jobs in the mountains

Once upon a time the inquisitive and the young, the reckless and the incurably naive wore their convictions on the rear bumpers of their Volkswagen Beetles: “Question authority.” Time marches on. Now those purveyors of rebellion have become the authority, and they want no further questions. “Shut up,” they advise.

Ms. Lynch is a tough prosecutor, more lawyer and prosecutor than politician, and thus very different from the man she is to replace. (Associated Press)

Questions for Loretta Lynch

Loretta Lynch, the president’s nominee to replace Eric Holder as the U.S. attorney general, faces question-and-answer time next week, and this will be the first opportunity for the new Republican majority to demonstrate that there’s a new and more just world on Capitol Hill. She will not necessarily face a hostile panel of the Senate Judiciary Committee, nor should she. She is a known quantity as U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of New York, first appointed by President Clinton and reappointed by President Obama.

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** FILE ** This mouse was produced from stem cells coaxed from skin tissue of adult mice and then reprogrammed. Two teams of Chinese scientists have made a major advance in the development of a new kind of stem cell that doesn't involve destroying embryos. (AP Photo/Nature, Dr. Qi Zhou)

EDITORIAL: Good news for rats and federal bureaucrats

Well-meaning Americans who want greater federal involvement in their lives are sure the government will do what's best to protect the public. It's about trust. But a decision by the Federal Labor Relations Authority illustrates how the first mission of the government is to protect the government.

** FILE ** In this March 31, 2011, file photo House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Rep. Darrell Issa, Caliornia Republican, right, accompanied by the committee's ranking Democrat Rep. Elijah Cummings, Maryland Democrat, presides over the committee's hearing on the Freedom of Information Act on Capitol Hill. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

EDITORIAL: The high cost of freedom of information

When Sandy Berger, the national security adviser to Bill Clinton, realized the National Archives had documents that he didn't want the public to see, he stuffed them down his pants and walked out of the building. Today's bureaucrats don't need to go to such extremes.

Sen. Ted Cruz, Texas Republican, called the court's decision not to take on any gay marriage cases"tragic" and vowed to take action. (associated press)

EDITORIAL: The gay-marriage conundrum

A man who imagined himself quite the wit once posed a riddle to Abraham Lincoln: "If you count a dog's tail as a leg, how many legs does a dog have?" Just four, the president replied. "You can call a tail a leg, but it's not a leg."

Bellevue Hospital nurse Belkys Fortune, left, and Teressa Celia, Associate Director of Infection Prevention and Control, pose in protective suits in an isolation room, in the Emergency Room of the hospital, during a demonstration of procedures for possible Ebola patients, Wednesday, Oct. 8, 2014. The U.S. government plans to begin taking the temperatures of travelers from West Africa arriving at five U.S. airports, including the New York area's JFK International and Newark Liberty International, as part of a stepped-up response to the Ebola epidemic. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

EDITORIAL: Close the borders to Ebola

The Obama administration is certain that the president and all his men know more about everything than just about anyone else. They see no point in listening to anyone outside the comfortable confines of the White House bunker.

Mao Zedong

EDITORIAL: The benefits of inequality

Income inequality between the world's rich and poor has grown to levels not seen since the 1820s, says the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The Paris-based association of 34 of the wealthiest nations produced a report that's stoking the fire in the bellies of liberals who decry the state of affairs and demand renewed attempts to redistribute the wealth.

This Tuesday, Sept. 30, 2014 photo shows a sign on northbound Interstate 19, near Amado, Ariz., in the southern part of the state, that tells drivers they are kilometers away from their destination. Although other highways around the country have some metric signs, I-19 is the only continuous highway that is entirely in the metric system. The signs were installed nearly 40 years ago as part of pilot program that aimed to introduce the use of the metric system in the United States. (AP Photo/Astrid Galvan)

EDITORIAL: End of the road for the metric system

The metric system lives no longer on American highways. The Arizona Department of Transportation is preparing to take down the signs on Interstate 19 that tell a motorist that it's 64 kilometers to Tucson. This is the end of the road for Jimmy Carter's idea to measure everything by the metric system in America, like it or not.

President Barack Obama speaks at the League of Conservation Voters Capitol Dinner at the Ronald Reagan Building on Wednesday, June 25, 2014, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

EDITORIAL: The league of crony voters

The League of Conservation Voters is going all in with $25 million on the table in a desperate gamble to keep the Senate in Democratic hands. "This is five times more than what we spent in 2010," Daniel Weiss, a senior vice president of the league, tells a C-SPAN interviewer.

FILE--This undated file photo shows convicted police killer Mumia Abu-Jamal. Goddard College, a liberal arts college in Plainfield, Vt., with 600 students, said  on its website Tuesday, Sept. 30, 2014, that Mumia Abu-Jamal's recorded remarks will be played Sunday at a commencement, along with a video about him. (AP Photo/Jennifer E. Beach, File)

EDITORIAL: Cut off Mumia's microphone

Commencement speeches can be amusing, inspiring or, in the worst (some would say even the best) case, a bit dull. Goddard College, a small liberal arts school in Plainfield, Vt., wanted a different kind of speaker. The graduating class chose a cop killer.

In this Aug. 27, 2014 photo, a lab technician shows containers of frozen human milk at the Fernandes Figueira Institute in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. A group of American doctors are in Brazil to learn how the country's extensive milk bank system works. With more than 200 such banks nationwide, where breast-feeding women can donate milk that is then pasteurized and used in neo-natal facilities, Brazil has cut down dramatically in infant mortality. Doctors in the U.S. are looking to duplicate Brazil's success. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)

EDITORIAL: Misrepresenting the U.S.'s high infant-mortality rate

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) finds that the United States has one of the highest infant-mortality rates in the developed world. This is shocking on its face, and certain doom-criers want to declare a national emergency and get the federal government to work on reforming the American health care system.

Washington Redskins owner Dan Snyder, right, waves to fans as he walks the sideline before the Washington Redskins play the New England Patriots in NFL preseason football at FedExField, Landover, Md.,  Thursday, August 7, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)Monday, September 9, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

EDITORIAL: The tolerance of bigotry

Most Americans are of one mind about the values important in raising children. Every parent, regardless of political disposition, wants his child to be responsible, well-mannered, independent and persistent.