Editorials

Featured Articles
Recent Articles
  • Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe gestures during an interview in his office at the Capitol in Richmond, Va., Friday, Jan. 17, 2014. McAuliffe, appointed former republican operative Boyd Marcus to the Virginia ABC Board.  (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

    EDITORIAL: Medicaid expansion shortens McAuliffe-legislature honeymoon

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    The honeymoon, such as it was, is over. Terry McAuliffe moved into Virginia's governor's mansion little more than a fortnight ago, and already he's spoiling for a fight with the legislature. The Democratic bag man set the stage for his first clash with the Republican-dominated General Assembly over expansion of the state's Medicaid rolls under Obamacare. Published January 27, 2014

  • "My aim is to make sure that energy remains affordable for households and companies," says Gunther Oettinger, energy commissioner for the European Commission. Leaders in the European Union are revamping their approach to climate change because higher energy costs have not sit well with consumers in a struggling economy. (Associated Press)

    EDITORIAL: European Union cooling to global-warming energy costs

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    In both America and Europe, the public was assured that banning popular incandescent light bulbs was for everyone's good. We ought to take note of what's happening on the other side of the Atlantic. The government that giveth, taketh. Published January 27, 2014

  • President Barack Obama works at his desk in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Monday, Jan. 27, 2014, ahead of Tuesday night's State of the Union speech. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

    EDITORIAL: A weakened and hopeless Obama gives a State of the Union address

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    President Obama will coast down Pennsylvania Avenue on Tuesday evening, emerging from his limousine to address the nation as a leader with neither muscle nor momentum. Gone is all the hope that Mr. Obama brought to the House chamber for his first State of the Union speech five years ago, hope that he would bring transparency, bipartisanship and change to a capital stymied by partisan gridlock. Published January 27, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Restoring the American dream

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    We can expect President Obama's big speech Tuesday night to be full of his usual class-warfare bloviation about the "lack of upward mobility" being the "defining problem of our time." Published January 24, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Chuck Schumer urges IRS to harass Tea Party groups into silence

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Chuck Schumer, the Senate's No. 3 Democrat, thinks the Internal Revenue Service hasn't done enough to silence the Tea Party. Published January 24, 2014

  • A threat of Islamic violence hovers over the Olympics

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Some of the athletes and tourists are growing wary of Sochi, the Russian city that will be the host for the Winter Olympic Games. They're afraid they're walking into a trap set by the Black Widows. Published January 24, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Hungry alligators await as the U.S. Treasury is running out of gimmicks

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Republicans are retreating from Capitol Hill in mortal fear of being called nasty names, such as "obstructionist" and "partisan" and "naysayer," and the White House, which understands take-no-prisoner politics, is pressing the advantage. We're headed for more spending, and lots of it. Published January 23, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: A 'log cabin' of gossamer

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Obscurity is sometimes the place to find blind ambition. That's where Texas liberals found their latest great Democratic hope. Wendy Davis, a state senator of no particular distinction, captured the liberal imagination with a dramatic 11-hour filibuster last year in an attempt to preserve late-term abortions. Published January 23, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: The real dummies

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    When Jim DeMint left the U.S. Senate last year to run the Heritage Foundation, Gov. Nikki Haley tapped Rep. Tim Scott to replace him as the senator from South Carolina. It was a brilliant choice, one the state's voters are likely to endorse in a November special election. Published January 23, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Lawlessness in Virginia

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Republicans in the Virginia General Assembly are considering whether to take a page from the Boy Scout Handbook: Be prepared. Virginia's new governor and attorney general, highly skilled partisan Democrats, signal they aren't likely to play nice. Published January 22, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Harry Reid's casino luck

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    In a just world, no politician would leave office wealthier than on the day he takes the oath of office. We don't live in a just world, alas, and the rags-to-riches life stories of more than a few U.S. senators strain credulity. Published January 22, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Snow shovels for the rich

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Manhattan woke up after Tuesday's blizzard to find the city snowed in, with some of the citizens more snowed in than others. The snow on the streets was deeper on the Upper East Side, the fashionable, expensive neighborhoods of the rich and the elite, and the very liberal. Published January 22, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Wyoming town taken over by an Indian tribe

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Residents of Riverton, a quiet town of 11,000 in Wyoming, were shocked to wake up one recent morning to learn they were now Indians. Sort of. Published January 21, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Muzzling granny about alternatives to abortion

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    The Supreme Court considers whether Eleanor McCullen, a 77-year-old grandmother in Massachusetts, belongs in jail for counseling pregnant women about alternatives to abortion. Published January 21, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Virginia Sen. Mark Warner faces strong challenger

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Sen. Mark R. Warner calls himself a "radical centrist," but he has compiled a voting record over his five years in the U.S. Senate that's anything but "centrist." Published January 21, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Illinois home care workers resist forced unionization

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    The Supreme Court has under consideration a labor case that could change a lot of things. The question posed seems simple enough: Can Americans be required to join organizations without offending the First Amendment's guarantee of freedom of association? The answer, like the question, seems simple enough, too. Published January 20, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Senators up for re-election avoid Obama

    By

    You might think President Obama has come down with swine flu the way red-state Democrats are keeping a distance. When Mr. Obama flew to North Carolina State University for a job-creation photo op last week, Sen. Kay R. Hagan's name was conspicuously absent from Air Force One's flight manifest. Facing a tough re-election fight this fall, the freshman senator insisted she couldn't make the day trip because she had to stay in Washington and "attend to Senate business." Published January 20, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Now that everybody is outraged, Obama unconvincingly promises NSA changes

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    What could be easier than promising reform to a top-secret program nobody is supposed to know about? President Obama says he'll rein in the National Security Agency (NSA) and its domestic spying program now that nearly everybody is outraged. He can promise everything, and nobody will ever know whether he changes anything. Even the rulings of the court with oversight are part of the game. Published January 20, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Obama hits a restraining wall

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    President Obama's assault on the Constitution hit a restraining wall the other day. A federal appeals court struck down the administration's attempt to impose new rules on the Internet, and the Supreme Court, based on questioning by the justices — not always a reliable guide to their intentions — appears likely to tell Mr. Obama that, as important as he is, he can't make an end run around the Constitution to appoint certain senior officials in the executive branch. Published January 17, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Hillary's not-so-little list

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Politicians, like elephants, cultivate long memories. Like elephants, some politicians don't get mad, they get even. Nobody channels elephants like Bill and Hillary Clinton. Bubba moderates his reputation for mischief with good ol' boy bonhomie. Hillary, not so much. Published January 17, 2014

TWT Video Picks
Political Cartoons
  • The basket was full until the IRS got hold of it.

    The basket was full until the IRS got hold of it.

    Illustration by Dana Summers of the Tribune Media Services

  • Happening Now
    Continuing Coverage
      Get Involved

      Write for Commentary

      All commentary submissions must be original and exclusive to The Washington Times. Standard length for op-eds is 600-800 words. Longer submissions are less likely to be accepted. Please allow us 72 hours to review your submission. If we have not contacted you within that period, you are free to submit it elsewhere. All op-eds are subject to editing for space, style and clarity.

      Please complete the two forms below and email to commentary@washingtontimes.com

      IRS W-9
      Freelance Agreement