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Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton.  (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The Hillary tapes

War is a terrible thing, as everyone who has ever been in one can testify, but war can tempt a president, and sometimes merely someone with the itch to be a president, as a way to burnish a warrior credential.

The South Lawn of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Two bites out of the economy

Taxes take a bite out of the economy, but regulations take a bigger one. Congress has surrendered much of its lawmaking authority to the president and a growing swarm of unelected bureaucrats, and regulations are growing faster than ever. The Obama administration thinks this is the way to run an economy. It’s actually the way to cripple it.

Hillary Rodham Clinton

The baggage of Benghazi

Politics is a rough game. There’s no rule that says you can’t rough the passer or avoid making hits to the head. There’s not even a rule that says it’s unfair to take a dispassionate look at the record of a candidate who offers himself — or herself — for president of the United States. This includes a thorough baggage search.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich is traveling the country now as an evangelist for expansion, urging other governors to follow his lead. (AP Photo/James Nord)

John Kasich’s medicine show

Gov. John Kasich of Ohio was one of several Republican governors who agreed in 2013 to accept a grant of federal money under Obamacare to expand his state’s Medicaid services. The temporary grant of $2.6 billion, accepted over protests from his legislature, expires this year and Mr. Kasich now wants the legislature to approve taking more Obamacare subsidies to continue to pay for the expansion.

A pedestrian walks in the middle of Seventh Avenue in Times Square, New York, early Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2015.  (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

The Great Blizzard of ’15

Nothing is more tempting to television’s talking heads than exaggerating an approaching doomsday of blizzards, droughts, hurricanes, traffic jams, abortion rallies and other disasters, and nothing is riskier for politicians. What was hyped as the Great Blizzard of ‘15 turned out to be the Usual Snowfall of ‘15, and now the politicians are squirming under an avalanche of second-guessing.

Related Articles

Colorado Secretary of State Scott Gessler answers a question during a debate of Colorado Republican gubernatorial hopefuls hosted by 9NEWS, in Denver, Thursday April 24, 2014. The GOP primary is in June. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

EDITORIAL: No voter fraud? Don't tell Connecticut

As frequent beneficiaries of bogus balloting, Democrats rarely acknowledge that voter fraud is real. Anyone who wants to guard against Election Day shenanigans is painted as a conspiracy nut, because voter fraud "doesn't exist." But it does, and one prominent Democrat has proved it.

George Will (Associated Press) **FILE**

EDITORIAL: The academic mob silences free speech, again

Scripps College, an all-female school in Claremont, Calif., founded on the principle that "the paramount obligation of a college is to develop in its students the ability to think clearly and independently," last week revoked an invitation to conservative newspaper columnist George Will to speak to students because its administrators were offended by his rigorous math.

** FILE ** This mouse was produced from stem cells coaxed from skin tissue of adult mice and then reprogrammed. Two teams of Chinese scientists have made a major advance in the development of a new kind of stem cell that doesn't involve destroying embryos. (AP Photo/Nature, Dr. Qi Zhou)

EDITORIAL: Good news for rats and federal bureaucrats

Well-meaning Americans who want greater federal involvement in their lives are sure the government will do what's best to protect the public. It's about trust. But a decision by the Federal Labor Relations Authority illustrates how the first mission of the government is to protect the government.

** FILE ** In this March 31, 2011, file photo House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Rep. Darrell Issa, Caliornia Republican, right, accompanied by the committee's ranking Democrat Rep. Elijah Cummings, Maryland Democrat, presides over the committee's hearing on the Freedom of Information Act on Capitol Hill. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

EDITORIAL: The high cost of freedom of information

When Sandy Berger, the national security adviser to Bill Clinton, realized the National Archives had documents that he didn't want the public to see, he stuffed them down his pants and walked out of the building. Today's bureaucrats don't need to go to such extremes.

Mao Zedong

EDITORIAL: The benefits of inequality

Income inequality between the world's rich and poor has grown to levels not seen since the 1820s, says the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The Paris-based association of 34 of the wealthiest nations produced a report that's stoking the fire in the bellies of liberals who decry the state of affairs and demand renewed attempts to redistribute the wealth.

Bellevue Hospital nurse Belkys Fortune, left, and Teressa Celia, Associate Director of Infection Prevention and Control, pose in protective suits in an isolation room, in the Emergency Room of the hospital, during a demonstration of procedures for possible Ebola patients, Wednesday, Oct. 8, 2014. The U.S. government plans to begin taking the temperatures of travelers from West Africa arriving at five U.S. airports, including the New York area's JFK International and Newark Liberty International, as part of a stepped-up response to the Ebola epidemic. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

EDITORIAL: Close the borders to Ebola

The Obama administration is certain that the president and all his men know more about everything than just about anyone else. They see no point in listening to anyone outside the comfortable confines of the White House bunker.

Sen. Ted Cruz, Texas Republican, called the court's decision not to take on any gay marriage cases"tragic" and vowed to take action. (associated press)

EDITORIAL: The gay-marriage conundrum

A man who imagined himself quite the wit once posed a riddle to Abraham Lincoln: "If you count a dog's tail as a leg, how many legs does a dog have?" Just four, the president replied. "You can call a tail a leg, but it's not a leg."

This Tuesday, Sept. 30, 2014 photo shows a sign on northbound Interstate 19, near Amado, Ariz., in the southern part of the state, that tells drivers they are kilometers away from their destination. Although other highways around the country have some metric signs, I-19 is the only continuous highway that is entirely in the metric system. The signs were installed nearly 40 years ago as part of pilot program that aimed to introduce the use of the metric system in the United States. (AP Photo/Astrid Galvan)

EDITORIAL: End of the road for the metric system

The metric system lives no longer on American highways. The Arizona Department of Transportation is preparing to take down the signs on Interstate 19 that tell a motorist that it's 64 kilometers to Tucson. This is the end of the road for Jimmy Carter's idea to measure everything by the metric system in America, like it or not.

President Barack Obama speaks at the League of Conservation Voters Capitol Dinner at the Ronald Reagan Building on Wednesday, June 25, 2014, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

EDITORIAL: The league of crony voters

The League of Conservation Voters is going all in with $25 million on the table in a desperate gamble to keep the Senate in Democratic hands. "This is five times more than what we spent in 2010," Daniel Weiss, a senior vice president of the league, tells a C-SPAN interviewer.