Political Editorials - Washington Times
Skip to content

Editorials

Featured Articles

U.S. First lady Melania Trump greets First lady Brigitte Macron, left, wife of President Emmanuel Macron of France, after she addressed a luncheon at the U.S. Mission to the United Nations in New York Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017.  (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)

The right stuff from a first lady

First ladies are usually, but not always, eager to establish themselves as separate but equal personalities. Some of them are content to be the “wife of,” but nearly all of them leave their mark on a presidency, even if only their husbands know the details of how and when the mark was applied.

FILE - In this Jan. 26, 2016 file photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is joined by Joe Arpaio, the sheriff of metro Phoenix, at a campaign event in Marshalltown, Iowa. Prosecutors in former Sheriff Joe Arpaio's now-pardoned criminal case face a deadline Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017, for explaining why they now believe the case should be dismissed and all rulings should be thrown out. Judge Susan Bolton set the deadline after she found that prosecutors hadn't offered any legal authority to back up their argument. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

Showtime in the Senate

Now is the time for all good Republicans to put up or shut up. There’s no more time for big talk about repealing and replacing Obamacare. The hot air sent spiraling into the cosmos over the eight years of the Obama administration, by big talkers safe in the expectation that whatever they did would get only a veto, was enough to raise the temperature of this planet and maybe Saturn and Pluto as well.

President Donald Trump walks to his seat after speaking during a luncheon with African leaders at the Palace Hotel during the United Nations General Assembly, Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017, in New York. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Premature applause for the Trump trio

The point of political affiliation, like fan loyalty, is to join a team to win. Donald Trump promised voters weary of being beaten like a drum that if he were elected they would soon “get sick of winning.” That hasn’t happened. Yet. So it shouldn’t surprise anyone that most Americans are cheering the president for linking up with the Democrats to post some victories. They might restrain the high-fives, though. Those triumphs come with a hefty price tag.

More pain and suffering on campus

History is complicated, and rarely is anything settled about the facts of what happened, and why, in wars, revolutions and crusades past. Historians are the first to say that those who think they know it all usually don’t. But it’s usually the ignorant who yell the loudest.

U.S. President Donald Trump addresses the 72nd session of the United Nations General Assembly, at U.N. headquarters, Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

Fair warning at the U.N.

No more globaloney. That was the enduring message President Trump had Tuesday for the United Nations. He gave it to the delegates with the bark on, but tempered with just enough of the butter they’re accustomed to hearing from their indulgent betters.

Related Articles

The unlikely romance on Capitol Hill

The Republican Congress of 2017 bears a remarkable resemblance to the New York Mets of 1962, their first year in baseball. The Mets couldn't hit the ball and they couldn't catch the ball and succeeded only in showing up for supper. Their manager, Casey Stengel, "the old perfessor," finally cried out in desperation: "Can't anybody here play this game?"

President Donald Trump pauses during a news conference with the Emir of Kuwait Sheikh Sabah Al Ahmad Al Sabah in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday Sept. 7, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Thrown off the gravy train

The Environmental Protection Agency's gravy train just ain't what she used to be. Green groups are awestruck, agog and maybe even aghast at the news that the Trump administration has put a political operative to work vetting applications for EPA grants worth hundreds of millions of dollars.

Washington State University College Republicans President Amir Rezamand, right, and his predecessor, James Allsup, second from right, who resigned after attending the Confederate monuments protest in Charlottesville, Va., talk with unidentified students during a small rally for Free Speech organized by the Washington State University chapter of Young Americans For Liberty on Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017 in Pullman, Wash. (Geoff Crimmins/The Moscow-Pullman Daily News via AP)

Regulating free speech

"Everybody talkin' 'bout heaven ain't goin' there," as the ancient spiritual of the black church in America warns, and that goes double about free speech. "Free speech" sounds good to just about everybody, but actual free speech is a brew too strong for everybody. Many meddlesome do-gooders applaud government-regulated speech and call it free speech. Everybody's free to say what the government says is OK to say. What's not free about that?

Vautrot's Cajun Cuisine shows the severe damage caused inside and out following heavy flooding, Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017 in Bevil Oaks, Texas. (Kim Brent/The Beaumont Enterprise via AP)

Fixing flood insurance in Harvey's wake

Hurricane Harvey took the most devastating flooding in the city's history to Houston, and the cost of repairing the damage will be astronomical. Sadly, the federal flood insurance program is already underwater and Harvey will only add to the flood of red ink. It's clear that Congress must reform the program so the premiums property owners pay more closely reflect the flood risk. Until that happens, nature's frequent fury will continue to undermine the finances of everyone.

FILE- In this Tuesday, April 5, 2016 file photo, an employee sorts Legos in the the new LEGO flagship store unveiled as part of the new Les Halles shopping mall during the press visit in Paris. Danish toy maker Lego said Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017, it will cut 1,400 jobs, or about eight percent of its global workforce, after reporting a decline in sales and profits in the first half of 2017. (AP Photo/Francois Mori, File)

The maximum price of the minimum wage

It's easy to be generous with someone else's money. Politicians get away with it because the average American does not understand fundamental economics. Raising the minimum wage by law is popular because many people think no one has to pay the costs. When someone posts a reminder of how the world works, the ignorant scream.

People hold up a banner during an event to protest President Donald Trump's decision to revoke the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017, in Las Vegas. President Donald Trump on Tuesday began dismantling the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program, the government program protecting hundreds of thousands of young immigrants who were brought into the country illegally as children. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Waking up from an impossible dream

Complicated problems defy simple solutions, especially when the problems are deliberately created. The dilemma over what to do with children brought into the United States by their illegal-immigrant parents, the so-called "Dreamers," is Exhibit A. They stand illegally on American soil in the impassive eyes of the law, but they're already American in their hearts. President Trump's decision to enact an "orderly wind-down" of executive amnesty for these Americans-of-the-heart sets the stage for a fair-minded solution to a long-standing immigration quandary.

Sen. Claire McCaskill

Fear stalks Democratic incumbents

A Texas politician once sneered that "the middle of the road is for yellow lines and dead armadillos." But it's also a haven, if only a temporary one, for politicians suddenly afraid of the life they've cultivated at the edge.

When a shoe doesn't fit, wear it anyway

Summer's nearly over, the first hurricane of the season has arrived with catastrophic force, and men will have to put away their white slacks and black-and-white spectators when they take them off Monday night. So it's time to think about shoes.

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt (Associated Press)

Tales from the red-tape factory

The Environmental Protection Agency regards itself as the dispenser of the good and the just, protector of the snail darter and keeper of the land and everything on it. Anyone who questions this article of the faith can expect trouble.

Dancing on the debt ceiling

Washington knows how to turn melodrama into farce. That's the lowdown on the debt ceiling debate about to be served up on Capitol Hill. It would be a laugh if it were not so serious. The oft-repeated argument that the nation must keep overspending in order to stay on course leaves the sane shaking their heads. But without a correction of direction, the unpayable bill will come due and there will be no last laugh.

It's 4th and long for Colin

Dr. Johnson observed that "patriotism is the last refuge of scoundrels." Perhaps, but scoundrels have moved on. Crying "racism" when there is no racism is the work of modern scoundrels, and most of them are on the left.

White nationalist demonstrators use shields as they clash with counter demonstrators at the entrance to Lee Park in Charlottesville, Virginia, on Aug. 12. (Associated Press)

The Charlottesville disease continues

Two weeks after the fact, the continuing hysteria over Charlottesville is more about the temperature of President Trump's denunciations (there have been several) of Nazis, Klansmen and other white supremacists than about the riot itself.

Lou Ferrigno

A super-hero to the rescue

Combative times require sturdy leaders, and the only reality we have comes from the world of entertainment. The word that Lou Ferrigno, aka the Hulk, may be joining the Trump administration via the President's Council on Fitness, Sports and Nutrition,is just plain good news.

FILE - In this Sunday, April 9, 2017 file photo, two Swiss guards stand in front of St. Peter's Basilica prior to a Mass to be celebrated by Pope Francis, in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican. The head of the Swiss Guards says the elite corps that protects the pope and the Vatican is ready to confront any terror attacks, following renewed threats against Rome by supporters of the Islamic State group following the Barcelona attack. Commander Christoph Graf told Swiss Catholic website cath.ch this week that "perhaps it is only a question of time before an attack like that happens in Rome. But we are ready also for this." (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino, File)

A stroll into danger

April in Paris. Autumn in Rome. White nights in Stockholm and Oslo. All suggest long, languorous walks through Europe's great capitals. In Europe as nearly everywhere else, the cliche is true: the best way to see a city is on foot.

In this April 20, 2017, photo, cigarettes overflow from an ashtray inside the home of suspected child webcam cybersex operator, David Timothy Deakin, from Peoria, Ill., during a raid in Mabalacat, Philippines. Children's underwear, toddler shoes, cameras, bondage cuffs, fetish ropes, meth pipes, stacks of hard drives and photo albums cluttered the stuffy, two-bedroom townhouse. In his computer files, there were videos and images of children engaged in sex acts. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

A choice, and a risk

Only a hermit in a mountain cave in the wilds of the Montana outback hasn't heard that smoking is hazardous to health, his, others and maybe even the health of the grizzlies. Since the U.S. Surgeon General warned everyone in 1964 that puffing the wicked weed is deadly as well as anti-social, no one can plead ignorance of the risk of lung cancer, other diseases, and a painful, premature death,