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FILE - This undated file photo provided by Gilead Sciences shows the hepatitis C medication Sovaldi. Gilead Sciences says it has reached a deal with several generic drugmakers to produce cheaper versions of its popular, expensive hepatitis C drug Sovaldi for use in developing countries. (AP Photo/Courtesy of Gilead Sciences, File)

EDITORIAL: The spreading Obamacare virus

Socialized health care in the United States comes by incrementalism. Obamacare and its exchanges preserve the illusion of a free market for insurance coverage, but we’re inching ever closer to the left’s dream of “single-payer,” a system of one-size-fits-all medical treatment organized by the government.

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D.C. Council members Muriel Bowser (left) and David A. Catania, and former council member Carol Schwartz, candidates for mayor of the District, took swipes at each other during a debate Wednesday. The three, each hoping to succeed Mayor Vincent C. Gray, will debate again Thursday, in advance of Saturday's start of early voting. (ASSOCIATED PRESS)

EDITORIAL: For D.C. mayor, none of the above

Sitting out an election is not always an act of apathy or civic disengagement. Sometimes it can be the right choice, when the options are as unappetizing, as they are in the nation's capital this year for voters charged with choosing a successor to Mayor Vincent C. Gray.

Workers set up a giant advertisement for Apple's iPhone 6 which goes on sale in China, Friday, Oct 17 2014 in Beijing. China is one of Apple's largest and growing market where enthusiasts of the company's latest iPhone are willing to pay thousands of dollars to get their hands on the latest version. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

EDITORIAL: Apple and Google restrain the snoops

Obama administration officials seem to think the Constitution gives the government a license to snoop on whomever it pleases, whenever it pleases. The founding document does no such thing, of course, but Congress cannot summon the courage to restrain the executive branch.

Health workers wear protective gears before entering the house of a person suspected to have died of Ebola virus in Port loko Community situated on the outskirts of Freetown, Sierra Leone, Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014. After emerging months ago in eastern Sierra Leone, Ebola is now hitting the western edges of the country where the capital is located with dozens of people falling sick each day, the government said Tuesday. So many people are dying that removing bodies is reportedly a problem. (AP Photo/Michael Duff)

EDITORIAL: A respite from Ebola

The Ebola threat seems to have subsided, and that's cause for cautious relief. The operative word is "seems," but three weeks have passed since an unemployed Liberian man flew into the United States and infected two health care workers with the deadly virus.

Blowing billions

Spending $17.9 trillion is hard work. Dispensing cash at a rate of $1 million per hour would require 2,040 years to rack up a sum as large as the national debt. It's not that big-spending bureaucrats are lazy, but that their hard work has created their own special expertise at wasting money.

In this Sept. 10, 2014, file photo, North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory speaks to members of the media in Raleigh, N.C. In a letter dated Oct. 6 to French officials, McCrory said the plain packaging proposal may detract from more effective ways of curbing cigarette use. The French bill requiring neutral cigarette packs by 2016 is slated for debate in French Parliament next year. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)FILE-

Races for the statehouse

With little mystery about the prospects of continued Republican control of the House of Representatives, attention is focused on the Senate, where there is a lot of uncertainty. This focus gives short shrift to the important races for the statehouses, where Democrats are looking for bright spots but where the Republicans may produce several surprises.

This undated handout photo provided by Revolution shows Ron Klain, a former chief of staff to Vice President Joe Biden.   A longtime Democratic operative, Klain was tasked Friday by President Barack Obama with running the government's response to the Ebola crisis. (AP Photo/Revolution)

Ebola crisis needs more than a bureaucrat czar

President Obama's confused and timid response to the Ebola crisis has done nothing to calm the fear that stalks America, and choosing a well-connected Democratic lawyer, lobbyist and what the White House calls "an implementation expert" isn't likely to make anyone feel better. Ronald A. Klain has no medical, scientific, public health or administrative experience to become the nation's Ebola czar.

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal has found Democrats joining his side as he rallies for school choice, even some who helped kill a voucher bill before Hurricane Katrina. (Associated Press)

EDITORIAL: Cooling the car

Years ago, there was a hole in the ozone layer that was going to kill us all. Once the government banned aerosol hairspray and Freon, the stuff that made air conditioners and refrigerators work, the frenzy subsided. Now the government-mandated replacement for Freon, a chemical that goes by the name of R-134a, will end life as we know it. The White House is about to add the chemical to the list of prohibited substances, along with asbestos, anthrax and carbon dioxide.

Maryland Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan speaks during his first gubernatorial debate with Democratic candidate, Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, in Baltimore, Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014. (AP Photo/The Baltimore Sun, Amy Davis, Pool)

EDITORIAL: Hogan for governor

Democrats stand at the edge of panic. The miserable economy, a president who retreats from challenge to lead from behind and the failure of the federal government to deal responsibly with the Ebola crisis all undermine faith in the party of more and bigger government. In a state that runs deep blue, a Republican has a shot at taking the Maryland governor's mansion.

This undated image released by Bronner's Christmas Wonderland shows a Halloween-themed tree displayed at Bronner's Christmas Wonderland, a large Christmas store in Frankenmuth, Mich. So-called holiday creep, where the traditions one special occasion are embraced by another, now extends to Halloween. (AP Photo/Bronner's Christmas Wonderland)

EDITORIAL: Decking the halls with regulation

The Christmas season brings no joy to a bureaucrat. There's no heart for good will to appeal to. Banning things is what sets hearts afire in the Obama administration. The president most recently chased away the humble light bulb, the work of Thomas Edison a century ago, and replaced it with a pale substitute laced with deadly mercury. Only green fanatics were pleased.

In this photo provided by the Houston mayor's office, Houston Mayor Annise Parker, right and her long-time partner, First Lady Kathy Hubbard, celebrate at their wedding Thursday, Jan 16, 1014 in Palm Springs, Calif. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Paul Fromberg, rear, rector of St. Gregory of Nyssa Episcopal Church in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Houston Office of The Mayor, Richard Hartog)

EDITORIAL: Houston's chilling bid to silence the pulpits

Applying the name of "marriage" to homosexual unions is said by the lavender lobby to be an issue of equal rights. However, when the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the Defense of Marriage Act last year, the left began applying pressure on those who hold to traditional values, betraying a mindless intolerance of anyone who disagrees.

Colorado Secretary of State Scott Gessler answers a question during a debate of Colorado Republican gubernatorial hopefuls hosted by 9NEWS, in Denver, Thursday April 24, 2014. The GOP primary is in June. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

EDITORIAL: No voter fraud? Don't tell Connecticut

As frequent beneficiaries of bogus balloting, Democrats rarely acknowledge that voter fraud is real. Anyone who wants to guard against Election Day shenanigans is painted as a conspiracy nut, because voter fraud "doesn't exist." But it does, and one prominent Democrat has proved it.