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Protesters hold signs during a rally in support of transgender youth, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017, at the Stonewall National Monument in New York. They were demonstrating against President Donald Trump's decision to roll back a federal rule saying public schools had to allow transgender students to use the bathrooms and locker rooms of their chosen gender identity. The rule had already been blocked from enforcement, but transgender advocates view the Trump administration action as a step back for transgender rights. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

Free-for-all at the urinal

A visitor from Mars or Pluto could reasonably conclude that Earth is a weird planet indeed. “It’s a heavenly body of great beauty,” he might report back to headquarters, “where everyone is trying to change his and her sex but is so squeamish about talking about sex that they must coin euphemisms, such as ‘gender identity,’ to describe it.”

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting on domestic and international human trafficking, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017,in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

The comeback of coal

President Trump’s boisterous press conferences sometimes cast a shadow over one of his most important achievements so far: his executive order suspending runaway Environmental Protection Agency rules that all but bankrupted the American coal industry. Three of America’s largest coal companies declared Chapter 11 in recent years largely as a result of rules like the Clean Power Plant Act, a gift of Barack Obama.

FILE - In this Feb. 15, 2017 file photo, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington before the House Financial Services Committee for the Fed's semi-annual Monetary Policy Report to Congress.  Federal Reserve officials earlier this month discussed the need to raise a key interest rate again "fairly soon," especially if the economy remains strong. Minutes of the discussions in minutes released Wednesday, Feb. 22  showed that while Fed officials decided to keep a key rate unchanged at their Jan. 31-Feb. 1 meeting, there was growing concern about what could happen to inflation if the economy out-performed expectations. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The regulator cometh, and maybe goeth

There’s a lot to be said about government regulation — and much of it not good. Some regulation, given that human nature is what it is, is necessary. But sometimes it seems there’s little difference between the government telling you how to spend your money and the government just taking it. Regulations are a lot like taxes.

Protesters of President Donald Trump's immigration policies chant across the street from the U.S. Customs and Border Protection station Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017, in McAllen, Texas. (Joel Martinez/The Monitor via AP)

Immigration Order No. 2

The fight over who controls U.S. immigration policy is about to enter Round Two. President Trump pledges to come out swinging with a reformulated restriction on prospective immigrants. He seems deadly serious about defending the nation’s borders, and those who want to throw open the borders to everyone seem just as determined to stop him. The outcome will determine nothing less than who defines America.

Maple tree sap drips from a tap into a bucket, Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017, in Brookline, N.H. Sen. Maggie Hassan, D-NH, led a discussion with maple syrup producers in New Hampshire about how climate change is impacting their industry. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

Carbonated politics

Every problem in Washington finally finds a solution, and it’s usually called a tax. A group of policy mavens, eager to do something for everybody, proposes to tax carbon, the substance found in all forms of fossil fuels. It’s the fourth-most abundant element in the universe. The idea is that if there’s a levy on the carbon content of oil, coal and natural gas, consumers will use less of it. Presto! No more human-caused global warming. But it still smells like a tax.

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Attorney General Jeff Sessions, center, holds a meeting with the heads of federal law enforcement components at the Department of Justice in Washington, Thursday, Feb. 9, 2017. FBI Director James Comey sits at left and Acting Deputy Attorney General Dana Boente is at right. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, Pool)

The rant that failed

The Democrats in the U.S. Senate threw everything they could find at Jeff Sessions, including an occasional kitchen sink, but it was not enough. Rant as they might, the mild-mannered senator from Alabama, was nevertheless confirmed by a vote of 52 to 47. One Democrat, Joe Manchin of West Virginia, broke from the mob to vote to confirm him.

In this Feb. 1, 2017 photo, Anjali Lama, a transgender model from Nepal, holds a scarf up with another model as they wait to walk the ramp during Lakme Fashion week in Mumbai, India. Growing up as the fifth son in a poor farming family in rural Nepal the dream to be a fashion model came late in life. First came a long, painful struggle to accept that he felt deeply female. It was a chance encounter with a group of transgender women that turned Lama's life around by putting her in touch with the Blue Diamond Society, an advocacy group for Nepal's LGBT community. In 2005 she came out to her friends and family as a transgender woman. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool)

Aborted bliss in the boudoir

The lot of a transgendered wife is not always a happy one, no matter how many genders and marriages she terminates with extreme prejudice. A cheatin' heart can hurt in the unlikeliest places.

FILE - In this Nov. 19, 2016 file photo, then-President-elect Donald Trump walks Labor Secretary-designate Andrew Puzder from Trump National Golf Club Bedminster clubhouse in Bedminster, N.J. Puzder has proposed avoiding conflicts of interest by resigning as CEO of his fast food empire, selling off hundreds of holdings and recusing himself from government decisions in which he has a financial interest, according to his ethics filings with the government. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Plugging the terror gaps

President Trump hit the courthouse wall trying to prevent immigrants from seven terror-exporting nations from entering the United States until they can be properly vetted. This enables radical Islamic saboteurs to sneak past inefficient U.S. screening procedures like wolves among innocent sheep. Until the president's new vetting plans are in place, Congress must seek alternative measures to expel bad actors once discovered. Republican congressmen, fortunately, are working on it.

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos smiles while greeting employees after addressing the department staff at the Department of Education on Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017 in Washington. (AP Photo/Molly Riley)

Betsy DeVos laughs last

Betsy DeVos was what bomber pilots call "a target of opportunity," selected not from a carefully compiled list of strategic targets, but a target that a pilot with a few bombs left over from the day's work is free to drop if he sees something inviting. Chuck Schumer, comfortable in his safe place, knew he had to blow up somebody. His friends on the left were thirsty for scalps and blood.

This image released by the Sundance Institute shows Al Gore, second left, in a scene from "An Inconvenient Sequel" a film by Bonni Cohen and Jon Shenk. The film is an official selection of the Documentary Premieres program at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival. (Sundance Institute via AP)

An inconvenient stretcher

Bold predictions have a way of disappointing. Al Gore, whose extreme forecasts of climate catastrophe have yet to prove out, should take note. Blunders in the digital age are difficult to erase. That moving finger writes in permanent ink.

Illustration on Trump's beginnings on Obamacare repeal by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Repeal and replace

Whether campaigning for Congress or actually being in control, Republicans have a tradition of overpromising and underdelivering. Expected now to deliver on their promise, made in loud and brave voice, to repeal and replace Obamacare, some of the Republicans seem determined to live up to the reputation made over the decades.

President Donald Trump, center, waves to military service members after arriving on Air Force One at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., on Monday, Feb. 6, 2017. (Octavio Jones/Tampa Bay Times via AP)

Resisting the 'resistance'

The drums of conflict grow louder by the day. Never-Trump demonstrators and their rioting factions are mustering their forces to mortally wound Donald Trump's presidency before it gains further momentum. The battle is broader than opposition to an unconventional chief executive.

President Donald Trump salutes a Marines honor guard as he disembarks from Marine One upon arrival at the White House in Washington, Monday, Feb. 6, 2017, from a trip to Florida. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

A time to chill

The spirit of Rodney Dangerfield no longer stands alone. The comedian who complained that "I don't get no respect" now speaks for just about everybody. In modern America, "nobody gets no respect."

In this June 25, 2016, file photo, Cub Scouts watch a race during the Second Annual World Championship Pinewood Derby in New York's Times Square.  The Boy Scouts of America announced Monday, June 25, 2016, that it will allow transgender children who identify as boys to enroll in its boys only programs. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

More nibbling at the Scout oath

The assault on everything normal continues. The Boy Scouts of America abandoned the Scout Oath three years ago, which obliged a Scout to "keep myself morally pure," and opened its troops to boys who identify with the homosexual persuasion. Two years later it invited gay Scoutmasters to mentor the boys.

FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2016 file photo, then-Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump gestures as he talks with Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke, left, during a campaign stop at Milwaukee County War Memorial Center in Milwaukee. Clarke has risen to the national political spotlight with a brash, unapologetic personality reminiscent of President Donald Trump. But while some Republicans swoon over his prospects for higher office, the tough-talking, cowboy-hat wearing lawman remains one of the most polarizing figures in Wisconsin politics. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)

Uncle Sap no longer lives here

President Trump's ordering of certain mild sanctions against Iran and its friends only stings. Nobody feels much actual pain. But it sends a message to Iran that its testing of ballistic missiles capable of carrying a nuclear weapon violates the spirit, if not the letter, of the agreement it signed with the United States and other nations of the West.

A rainbow is shown from Bernal Heights Hill in San Francisco, Monday, Jan. 23, 2017. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

Indigestion at the table

San Francisco has long been on the cutting edge of fine cuisine, the gustatory equal of New York and New Orleans. The city sometimes calls itself "Baghdad by the Bay," a marketing stroke obviously coined by someone who had never been east of Suez, "where the best is like the worst." So when restaurant after restaurant started closing in recent months the foodie fashionistas in San Francisco swallowed hard and asked what happened.

Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., speaks at the Jefferson College of Health Sciences at the Carilion Clinic on Monday, Jan. 30, 2017, in Roanoke, Va. (Stephanie Klein-Davis/The Roanoke Times via AP)

When the party's over

The radical left, which now, alas, includes the Democratic Party, has gone off the rails. Worker bees at the Environmental Protection Agency and certain other federal agencies, encouraged by their superiors, are now using encrypted messages to coordinate undermining the policies of the new Trump administration. Sen. Tim Kaine of Virginia, the party's recent vice presidential nominee, seems to endorse "fighting" the new president "in the streets." The country has never seen such subversion by a major political party.

President Donald Trump pauses during a ceremony in Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017, for the swearing in ceremony of Rex Tillerson as Secretary of State. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Deliberate confusion over immigration

The immigration issue has become the Gordian knot of our time. It really isn't that complicated, but advocates of uncontrolled borders are more interested in turning up the heat than turning on the light. They're relentlessly dishonest. They're trying to paint the Trump presidency as a movement of Neanderthals intent on reversing "progressive" gains.

Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch, center arrives for a meeting with Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017 in Washington. Former Sen. Kelly Ayotte from New Hampshire walks with Gorsuch at left. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

The Gorsuch nomination

Presidents only occasionally hit home runs. In their league, curve balls simply vanish over the plate, fast balls come in with blinding speed, and sliders escape even a presidential slugger's eye.

President Donald Trump, accompanied by Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly, right, speaks during a meeting on cyber security in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2017. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump's no-huddle offense

The opening whistle has hardly faded to an echo, and President Trump has spread his receivers and hitting his targets. Good to his word, he is executing a White House game plan with a no-huddle offense. It's driven his adversaries to angry frustration. He's winning, and they're not.

Sainthood for Sally Yates

The rage of critics of Donald Trump has another target on Wednesday morning. They will be distracted from veneration of St. Sally by the opportunity to attempt the evisceration of the president's nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court.

President Donald Trump speaks in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Monday, Jan. 30, 2017, before signing an executive order. Trump order is aimed at significantly cutting regulations. White House officials are calling the directive a "one in, two out" plan. It requires government agencies requesting a new regulations to identify two regulations they will cut from their own departments. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

President Trump redeems his promises

President Donald Trump turns out to be unusually consistent in making good on his campaign promises, and this upsets the politicians to no send. The idea that he could be establishing a precedent so that voters will expect such consistency from politicians in the future is something too horrific for politicians to think about.

FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2017 file photo, President Barack Obama speaks during his final presidential news conference, in the briefing room of the White House in Washington. A spokesman for Obama says the former president "fundamentally disagrees" with discrimination that targets people based on their religion. The statement alluded to but did not specifically mention President Donald Trump's temporary ban on refugees from several Muslim-majority countries. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

Barack Obama pops off

Barack Obama promised no "popping off" when he flew to California for another vacation -- his second within a month -- minutes after Donald Trump was sworn in as his successor. But he learned that promises are hard to keep.

President Donald Trump speaks on the phone with German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Saturday, Jan. 28, 2017, in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

The graveyard vote

President Trump, like many of his critics in the media, speaks fluent hyperbole. When he exaggerates or stretches figures that may not have been carefully checked out, the critics, nearly all of them guilty of telling the occasional tall tale themselves, cry "fraud" and call him a "liar." But it's possible to be mistaken, or even dead wrong, without telling a lie. A lie is telling something that the speaker knows is a lie.

President Donald Trump speaks on the phone with King of Saudi Arabia Salman bin Abd al-Aziz Al Saud in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

The dark view of the president

The hatred of Donald Trump grows darker, more frightening and more irresponsible. A Secret Service agent assigned to protect the president put up a boast on her Facebook site that she wouldn't "take a bullet" for this president. The ABC television network inserts a promotional blurb for a coming movie about a presidential assassination into a real-life interview with Mr. Trump. A teacher in Dallas (which knows about presidential assassinations) projects a photographic image of the president at his inauguration in her classroom, shoots at the image with a water gun and screams "Die! Die! Die!"