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FILE - In this June 16, 2014 file photo, demonstrators chant pro-Islamic State group slogans as they carry the group's flags in front of the provincial government headquarters in Mosul, 225 miles (360 kilometers) northwest of Baghdad. The Islamic State group holds roughly a third of Iraq and Syria, including several strategically important cities like Fallujah and Mosul in Iraq and Raqqa in Syria. (AP Photo, File)

EDITORIAL: ISIS is the enemy

Chuck Hagel will soon leave his post as secretary of defense, but the threat from the barbarians grows. The threat from the Islamic State, or ISIS, looming over Iraq and Syria and the entire Middle East is compounded by the Obama administration’s confusion and cultivated weakness. Nobody with a clear understanding of what the world is about is in charge of the nation’s security.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry addresses the media after the closed-door nuclear talks with Iran, in Vienna, Austria, Monday, Nov. 24, 2014. Facing still significant differences between the U.S. and Iran, negotiators gave up on last-minute efforts to get a nuclear deal by the Monday deadline and extended their talks for another seven months. The move gives both sides breathing space to work out an agreement but may be badly received by domestic sceptics, since it extends more than a decade of diplomatic efforts to curb Iran's nuclear prowess. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

EDITORIAL: Iran stalls again

The lot of a diplomat is not always a happy one. Life in striped pants can be challenging. So much Chablis and brie, so little time. It’s not all polite chatter. In the matter of the crucial talks over the future of Iran’s nuclear program, all the pushing and pulling of policy, all the huffing and puffing of inflamed egos, will probably be for naught. Sooner or later, unless the Israelis rescue the West from fear and indecision, Iran will have its Islamic bomb.

EDITORIAL: The pigs find a loophole

“Earmarks,” small, large and enormous pots of taxpayers’ money that congressmen give themselves to fund pet projects in their districts, usually in return for votes, are a lot like Count Dracula. They won’t stay dead. But last week the Republicans in the House put down an attempt by one of their own to resurrect them.

Republicans will soon be empowered to adopt a number of much-needed reforms that will point Congress in the right direction. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

EDITORIAL: Putting momentum in harness

Congressional lethargy and inaction in the wake of the Republican wave of 2010 is not the fault of the Republicans, no matter how loud the cries of frustrated liberals. Over the course of the current Congress, the House of Representatives passed nearly 350 bills, only to see them die in Harry Reid’s Senate. Some of them surely deserved death, but not all.

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FILE - In this undated file photo released by Forest Guardians, a prairie dog eats in southwestern Utah. Cedar City residents who say prairie dogs are overrunning parts of their town are set to argue Thursday, Sept. 11, 2014 against federal regulations protecting the animals. Residents suing in federal court say the prairie dogs have done damage to the city's golf course, airport and at the cemetery, even interrupting funerals with their barking. (AP Photo/Forest Guardians, File)

EDITORIAL: Dogging it on the prairie

Prairie dogs, with more important things to do, don't engage in interstate commerce. That was the finding of a federal judge last week in a decision that could unravel the Endangered Species Act and restore a little respect for private property.

** FILE ** Sen. Harry Reid. (Associated Press)

EDITORIAL: Harry Reid's last hurrah

Congress will convene soon as a convention of lame ducks, and ducks usually don't do much. Five senators who were just escorted to the door will have the opportunity to cast one last vote for Harry Reid. The Republicans should know better than to allow these disgruntled few to make mischief. They'll clock out at the first opportunity.

Former President Ronald Reagan. (The Washington Times) ** FILE **

EDITORIAL: The Wall came tumbling down

When President Reagan traveled to Berlin to mark the 750th anniversary of the city, celebrated at the Brandenburg Gate in front of the Berlin Wall, the most consequential line in his memorable speech nearly didn't make it into the final draft.

In this Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014, file photo, former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg smiles prior to be conferred with the Chevalier de la Legion d'Honneur by France's Foreign minister Laurent Fabius, at the Quai d'Orsay, in Paris. Britain's Queen Elizabeth II has bestowed an honorary knighthood on the billionaire businessman and former New York mayor. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus, File)

EDITORIAL: Bloomberg's wasted millions

Mike Bloomberg put $50 million into Tuesday's elections, and he doesn't have much to show for it. Someone, perhaps the Koch brothers, ought to treat him to a Big Gulp. The onetime mayor of New York City organized a group called Everytown for Gun Safety, meant to rival the National Rifle Association, and with a lot more money. The new group was supposed to put gun control on the front burner. Instead, the gun-control candidates got scorched on the back burner.

Maryland Gov.-elect Larry Hogan speaks at a news conference, Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2014, in Annapolis, Md. Hogan campaigned relentlessly against tax increases and stuck to a pro-business message to win a big upset against Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown in the race for governor in heavily Democratic Maryland. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

EDITORIAL: The Republican wave

Pollsters everywhere are wiping egg from their faces, and a lot of the egg is scrambled. They predicted Republicans would have a good night, but their numbers were about as accurate as the television weatherman's 10-day forecast.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., celebrates with his supporters at an election night party in Louisville, Ky.,Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014. McConnell won a sixth term in Washington, with his eyes on the larger prize of GOP control of the Senate. The Kentucky U.S. Senate race, with McConnell, a 30-year incumbent, fighting off a spirited challenge from Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes, has been among the most combative and closely watched contests that could determine the balance of power in Congress. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

EDITORIAL: Now, to lead

Midterm elections are about incumbent presidents even when they aren't on the ballot. President Obama acknowledged this when he declared that "every single one" of his policies would be up for a vote Tuesday even though his name wouldn't be on anybody's ballot. On election eve, the White House hedged with the claim that since many of the closest Senate races were in states Mr. Obama didn't carry two years ago the results had to be taken with salt.