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Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton.  (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The Hillary tapes

War is a terrible thing, as everyone who has ever been in one can testify, but war can tempt a president, and sometimes merely someone with the itch to be a president, as a way to burnish a warrior credential.

The South Lawn of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Two bites out of the economy

Taxes take a bite out of the economy, but regulations take a bigger one. Congress has surrendered much of its lawmaking authority to the president and a growing swarm of unelected bureaucrats, and regulations are growing faster than ever. The Obama administration thinks this is the way to run an economy. It’s actually the way to cripple it.

Hillary Rodham Clinton

The baggage of Benghazi

Politics is a rough game. There’s no rule that says you can’t rough the passer or avoid making hits to the head. There’s not even a rule that says it’s unfair to take a dispassionate look at the record of a candidate who offers himself — or herself — for president of the United States. This includes a thorough baggage search.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich is traveling the country now as an evangelist for expansion, urging other governors to follow his lead. (AP Photo/James Nord)

John Kasich’s medicine show

Gov. John Kasich of Ohio was one of several Republican governors who agreed in 2013 to accept a grant of federal money under Obamacare to expand his state’s Medicaid services. The temporary grant of $2.6 billion, accepted over protests from his legislature, expires this year and Mr. Kasich now wants the legislature to approve taking more Obamacare subsidies to continue to pay for the expansion.

A pedestrian walks in the middle of Seventh Avenue in Times Square, New York, early Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2015.  (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

The Great Blizzard of ’15

Nothing is more tempting to television’s talking heads than exaggerating an approaching doomsday of blizzards, droughts, hurricanes, traffic jams, abortion rallies and other disasters, and nothing is riskier for politicians. What was hyped as the Great Blizzard of ‘15 turned out to be the Usual Snowfall of ‘15, and now the politicians are squirming under an avalanche of second-guessing.

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Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (Associated Press) **FILE**

Putting spice in marriage

The language of the New Age, like a lot of things in Li'l Abner's hometown of Dogpatch, can be "amusin' but confusin'." The word "sex" has been displaced by "gender," though no one ever called Marilyn Monroe a "genderpot," and no woman we know thinks a silky black night gown will make her feel "gendery." Gov. Terry McAuliffe of Virginia thinks he can ride to the rescue of all by making the language of marriage more confusing, if not amusing.

Men walk by a sign in Chattanooga, Tenn., promoting it as Gig City. The city's municipal fiber optic network provides Internet speeds at more than 50 times the national average. (AP Photo/Erik Schelzig)

The wrong way to a good idea

President Obama has set out to do for the Internet what he did for the nation's health care system. He's determined to destroy the Internet, which has changed the way the world works, as we know it.

 (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Flunking Econ 101

Julia lives. Everybody is trying to forget Julia, President Obama's campaign cartoon figure from his 2012 re-election campaign. "The Life of Julia" touted the advantages of cradle-to-grave federal munificence, from universal pre-kindergarten classes for toddlers to Obamacare for everybody. "Julia" might have been called a celebration of womb-to-tomb munificence, except that a shower of contraceptives and abortions under Obamacare would mean that prospective descendants of Julia would never make it out of the womb.

Securing the border first is a sound idea: This fence marks the U.S.-Mexico border at El Calaboz, Texas. (Associated press)

Stopping jihad in America

The terrorist attacks on France are a reminder that the broken U.S. immigration system isn't just about saving American jobs, but keeping out terrorists who are itching to make similar attacks in America. In the wake of the Paris attacks that killed 17 men and women last week, security officials have warned that the United States is a target for mayhem, too. President Obama's relentless determination to open the nation's borders to just about everyone makes it considerably easier for the Islamic jihadis to prepare a strike. We shouldn't need a violent episode here to remind everyone that a nation that won't control its border is no nation at all.

FILE - This Aug. 13, 2014 photo shows an array of mirrors at the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating site in Primm, Nev. The largest solar power plant of its type in the world, promoted as a turning point in green energy, isn’t producing the expected energy and one of the reasons is as basic as it gets: The sun isn’t shining as often as expected. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)

Where the sun doesn’t shine

Solar panels are one of the favorite hopes on the left for clean and renewable, energy. The evangelists for the sun claim that solar power capacity will double this year, and point out to the credulous that government programs offer tax breaks and incentives to encourage Americans to put up solar panels, and government-funded solar farms, like California's Ivanpah facility, are popping up like mushrooms (which actually prefer dark places) across the country.

In this March 11, 2013 file photo is a sign reading "Stop the Transcanada Pipeline" placed in a field near Bradshaw, Neb. Even if the Republican-led Congress approves the Keystone XL pipeline, not a drop of oil will flow through the system until Nebraska signs off on its route. The routing process is still before the state Supreme Court, and depending on how justices rule, it could be months or longer before any construction in Nebraska begins. (Associated Press)

Taking a vow of poverty

Cursing the darkness may be more satisfying than lighting a candle, but it ultimately keeps everyone in the dark. President Obama vows to veto construction of the Keystone XL pipeline, which the House approved by a wide margin on Friday. His steadfast opposition to the energy conduit from Canada places him squarely in league with those who measure human progress only with a thermometer.

Wrangell-St. Elias National Park in Alaska, view from Dead Dog Hill. Credit: National Park Service

Paying for the national parks

America's national parks are national treasures, unique in their natural beauty, geological features and recreational opportunities. The parks rescued millions of acres from waste and often thoughtless abuse. Since President Ulysses Grant set aside a federal preservation in 1872, the national park system has evolved to become the envy of other nations.

Associated Press Photo/Carolyn Kaster

Obama's snub of Paris

If Barack Obama has demonstrated one talent in his six years at the White House it's a unique "gift" for shutting his ears to the music of America. The man who says the Muslim call to evening prayer is the sweetest sound in his ears is deaf to the sounds that warm the hearts and stir the souls of the rest of us.

Atlanta Fire Chief Kelvin Cochran has been fired for authoring a Christian book in 2013 that described homosexuality as a "sexual perversion." (atlantaga.gov)

Stifling diversity in Atlanta

Liberals claim to be champions of "diversity" in all things, particularly in matters of race, ethnicity and gender (they mean "sex") and gender-bending. "Our diversity is our greatest strength," Bill Clinton, who demonstrated his embrace of diversity with the pursuit of a diversity of women in the White House, told a diversity forum last year in Phoenix.

Illustration on the dangers of proposed net neutrality action by the government by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Blunting a radical agenda at the FCC

When bureaucrats in the government think Congress isn't doing enough to push along an agenda, federal agencies still have the responsibility to regulate fairly and judiciously. But that's sometimes no fun. On President Obama's watch, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, for two examples, continue to merrily scoot around Congress to impose their own agendas.

Federal regulations are intended to make everyone safer and healthier. But rules imposed without regard to cost can and often do inflict more pain than pleasure. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Regulating the regulators

Americans hear a welcome jingle of coins in their pockets when they pull away from the gasoline pumps, and that music might get a little louder in coming weeks. With the price at the pump now little more than $2 a gallon in most places, drivers can look forward to saving $75 billion in annual fuel costs. The open road never looked more inviting.

Jaime Rodas and his daughter, Aria Rodas 3 enjoy an afternoon of sledding on Tuesday Jan. 6, 2015 on a hill in Jim Barnett Park in Winchester, Vvaa. (AP Photo/The Winchester Star, Ginger Perry)

Rough sledding

Winter, with its ice, snow and slush, doesn't offer many rewards — unless you're a kid with a sled, or an old inner tube or a big piece of cardboard. Then you can slide toward heaven, where, if you're lucky, a big pot of hot chocolate awaits in Mom's toasty kitchen.

'Gitmo' more dangerous open

Your recent editorial "Guantanamo terrorists leave, threat to America grows" (Web, Jan. 4) exaggerates the risk of releasing prisoners from Guantanamo and ignores the threat of keeping them there. The recidivism rate for Guantanamo detainees released under President Obama is not 30 percent, but 6.4 percent. Further, detainees are not released at random. They must be cleared unanimously for release by the agencies and departments in charge of our national security: the departments of Defense, Homeland Security, Justice and State, as well as the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence.

Chickens huddle in their cages at an egg processing plant at the Dwight Bell Farm in Atwater, Calif. The New Year is bringing rising chicken egg prices across the country as California starts requiring farmers to house hens in cages with enough space to move around and stretch their wings. The new standard backed by animal rights advocates has drawn fire nationwide because farmers in Iowa, Ohio and other states who sell eggs in California have to abide by the same requirements. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez,File)

Breaking eggs in California

You can't make an omelet without breaking a few eggs, as the Marxists are fond of saying to explain their brutal "persuasion," but if you can't afford breakfast you won't have to worry about the litter of the eggshells.

People gather outside the French Consulate in Toronto on Wednesday Jan. 7, 2015 in response to the shootings earlier in the day at Charlie Hebdo Magazine in Paris. The writing on the signs reads "I am Charlie." (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Chris Young)

Massacre in Paris

The boldness and the brutality of the Islamist terrorists know no bounds, and neither, until now, has the reluctance of the West to confront evil in whatever guise it presents itself.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani briefs media prior to departing Mehrabad airport to attend the United Nations General Assembly, in Tehran, Iran. Rouhani said Sunday, Jan. 4, 2015, that ongoing nuclear negotiations with world powers are a matter of "heart," not just centrifuges ahead of talks next week in Geneva. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi, File)

Iran's nuclear charade

When Ronald Reagan famously said "a government bureau is the nearest thing to eternal life we'll ever see on this earth," he could have been talking about the endless negotiations over how to spike Iran's nuclear program. The talks have been going on for 12 years, and no end is in sight. The talks have not quite covered eternity, but they have taken a long time to produce nothing but hot air.

House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, is handed the gavel from House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif. after being re-elected for a third term to lead the 114th Congress, as Republicans assume full control for the first time in eight years, Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais )

The challenge to the new Congress

John Boehner kept his speakership Tuesday, but not by enough to quiet the rebellion on a slow bubble in the ranks. His victory was much like that of the country preacher who wins a congregational vote of confidence by a margin of 38 to 37 and declares the church united.

French President Francois Hollande, poses after addressing his New Year's wishes to the nation during a pre-recorded broadcast speech at the Elysee Palace, in Paris, Wednesday, Dec. 31, 2014. (AP Photo/Ian Langsdon, Pool)

Hope but no change in France

President Francois Hollande, buoyed by the euphoria of his election in 2012, when everything good seemed possible and even probable, promised to resign if he failed to turn the struggling economy around. Frenchmen, like the Americans, swallowed whole the empty but clever marketing message of "Hope and Change," excited that a politician was willing to put his job on the line.

A series of photos posted to Sarah Palin's Facebook page showed her son, Trig, standing on the family dog.

Hypocrites in the slaughterhouse

Pity the noble dog. With friends like the fanatics at People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals pretending to be its best friends, the noble dog needs no enemies. PETA is the great pretender in the animal world.

In this March 1, 2002, file photo, a detainee is escorted to interrogation by U.S. military guards at Camp X-Ray at Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base, Cuba. (AP Photo/Andres Leighton, File)

EDITORIAL: Guantanamo terrorists leave, threat to America grows

The legend (and it's only a legend) is that George Washington could not tell a lie, even when his father confronted him as he stood over the stump of his father's favorite cherry tree, hatchet in hand. The cherry tree story was a bit of Parson Weems' harmless hyperbole. The hyperbole about Barack Obama is not likely to be flattering or harmless. He has established himself as the president of deception, with one important exception: his words and deeds about the American prison for terrorists at Guantanamo.