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A local resident holds a sign as he listens to Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speak at a rally for Omaha Democratic mayoral candidate Heath Mello, Thursday, April 20, 2017, in Omaha, Neb. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Riding the tiger

“He who rides a tiger is afraid to dismount,” a Chinese proverb cautions the unwary. That’s where the Democrats, flailing in a search for a way out of the wilderness, find themselves in their warm embrace of Trump Derangement Syndrome.

FILE -- In this Jan. 16, 2017 file photo, Richard Ratcliffe, husband of imprisoned charity worker Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, poses for the media during an Amnesty International led vigil outside the Iranian Embassy in London. The family of Zaghari-Ratcliffe who was detained in Iran while on a trip with her toddler daughter says all efforts to appeal her five-year prison sentence in court have failed. Ratcliffe, who works for the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of the news agency, found out this weekend that her appeal to Iran's supreme court failed. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant, File)

Addicted to uranium

When gentlemen compete, they honor the rules of the game and accept the referee’s calls. But no one would mistake the rulers of the Islamic Republic of Iran for gentlemen, and their gamesmanship in pursuing nuclear weapons is deadly serious. As the mullahs make a bid for more uranium, They have been called out for cheating. The United States is obliged to withhold approval of a new supply of the radioactive material until the regime can prove it’s not up to mischief. Anything else is simply tomfoolery.

Associated Press

Preserving voting rights in Maryland

Sometimes the best defense is a good offense, and this is often lost on conservatives. That might be about to change. In battles over protecting voting rights, conservatives are usually put on the defensive by lawyers of the litigious left as they seek sympathetic liberal judges to strike down common-sense ballot-integrity measures enacted by the states.

Associated Press

More reefer madness

Marijuana has gone mainstream, its reputation hardly recognizable from the 1930s when a popular movie called “Reefer Madness” depicted in melodramatic fashion the dangers of smoking cannabis.

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan wears cufflinks depicting the Maryland state flag as he signs a bill during a bill signing ceremony following the state's legislative session at the Maryland State House in Annapolis, Md., Tuesday, April 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Confusion in the marketplace

The Maryland legislature has just sent a bill to Gov. Larry Hogan that will, if he signs it, sow confusion in the state’s generic drug marketplace and subject consumers to considerable harm. It’s bad economics laced with a large dose of politics that begs him to pull out his veto pen and limber up his writing hand.

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President Trump decided that inaction against Syria posed far greater risk to the U.S. than action. (Associated Press/File)

A bad week for a rogue

Action speaks louder than red lines. Accepting the mantle of the leader of the free world, Donald Trump has just done what Barack Obama vowed to do, and never did. The sight of Syrian civilians massacred in a chemical weapons attack prompted President Trump to punish the Assad regime in the name of humanity. Next for a reckoning are Syria's more formidable protectors, Russia and Iran, which have drawn their own red lines. Fresh to the world stage, the dealmaker has put unruly powers on notice that he is as likely to strike a target as a bargain.

President Donald Trump watches as Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy administers the judicial oath to Judge Neil Gorsuch during a re-enactment in the Rose Garden of the White House, Monday, April 10, 2017, in Washington. Gorsuch's wife Marie Louise hold a bible at center. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

An early test of the Gorsuch court

The fireworks over the elevation of Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court — he was sworn in Monday as the ninth justice — overshadowed a perversion of the law by the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago that could offer an early indication of the tilt of the newly restored Supreme Court.

In this Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2017, file photo, Judge Neil Gorsuch stands with his wife Marie Louise Gorsuch as President Donald Trump announces him as his choice for the Supreme Court in the East Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Nine again

Neil Gorsuch is finally safe as a justice of the United States Supreme Court, survivor of a cheap campaign to impugn his character and his knowledge and devotion to the Constitution and the law. The justices number nine again, and Donald Trump has redeemed one of his most important promises.

President Donald Trump walks across the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Sunday, April 9, 2017. Trump is returning from a trip to his Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

A decisive week for the world

Donald Trump finally had a pretty good week after several weeks that were not so good. The U.S. Senate finally confirmed Neil Gorsuch for the U.S. Supreme Court, overcoming partisan opposition for opposition's sake, and his missile strike on the government forces of Bashar Assad stunned nearly everybody, destroying the Syrian air force base that launched the chemical strikes on Assad's own people.

Mark Hainds, a 48-year-old junior community college forestry professor from Andalusia, Alabama, walks about 3 miles from his stopping point, near Why, Ariz., Monday, April 3, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

Heck on the border

There's change coming on the border. Republicans on the House Ways and Means Committee are working to make Speaker Paul Ryan's tax reform scheme palatable enough to sell to a cranky chamber. It's a high wall to climb over.

Public Affairs Officer Josh Hammond is reflected in a puddle as restoration work on the USS Constitution continues, Wednesday, April 5, 2017, at the Charlestown Navy Yard in Boston. The ship enters dry dock for below-the-waterline repairs every 20 years. The world's oldest commissioned warship afloat is scheduled to return to the waters in late July. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

Roping in the cost of ships

Every sailor worth his salt knows the old knock: A boat is a hole in the water where you pour the money in. For Navy-size vessels, that hole in the water can be bottomless. As he commands the ship of state, President Trump has made it clear he intends to rebuild the nation's shrunken defense. While doling out cash to the warfighting services, the president should keep a weather eye on Navy shipbuilding contracts. They shouldn't dig that hole deeper than it should be.

FILE - In this Dec. 8, 2016 file photo Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev., speaks during a ceremony on Capitol Hill in Washington. Reid and John Boehner are going to co-chair a new public policy think tank at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. MGM Resorts International and UNLV plan to bring plans for the institute headed by the retired U.S. Senate Democratic majority leader from Nevada and the former House Republican speaker from Ohio before Nevada university regents on Thursday, March 2, 2017.  (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Banish the trolls

There's an entire class of litigants in patent law that lawyers call "venue-shoppers." U.S. district courts in East Texas and Delaware have become the go-to venues, courts likely to produce huge judgments in plaintiffs' favor. Courts in these jurisdictions have shown themselves to be sympathetic to the trolls, or as they call themselves, "patent-assertion entities."

The permanent police line-up

Most Americans haven't sampled the thrill of being the subject of a police line-up, where the victim of a crime studies the faces of suspects from behind a one-way mirror. The proliferation of facial recognition technology changes all that. While the police need every advantage they can manage to stay ahead of evildoers, strong safeguards are necessary to protect individual privacy and prevent false accusations and arrests.

National Security Adviser Susan Rice (Associated Press) **FILE**

Susan Rice strikes again

Susan Rice, the most notorious liar in the employ of Barack Obama, is revealed as the queen of the unmasked ball. She abused her position as the national security adviser to the president to obtain the "masked" name of at least one member of the Trump transition team in the weeks between the election and the inauguration. What she did with the information is anybody's guess, and anybody could make a pretty good one.

Senate Minority Leader Sen. Charles Schumer of N.Y., speaks during an interview in his office on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, March 30, 2017. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Sen. Schumer's chutzpah

Chuck Schumer is a New Yorker, so he knows about chutzpah. He schmears it liberally on his breakfast bagel. Chutzpah is the useful Yiddish for "shameless audacity," once defined by the young man who murdered his parents and begged the judge and jury to show "mercy for a poor orphan boy."

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, left, walks with Secretary of State Rex Tillerson to a lunch with President Donald Trump and Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi at the White House in Washington, Monday, April 3, 2017. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

No playing Russian roulette

On paper, NATO is an imposing institution --one of the world's oldest and largest collective defense alliances. On the ground, its strength hinges on a single question: Will its 28 signatory nations actually spend blood and treasure to honor their pledge of collective defense in time of war? No one will know until the dread moment of truth arrives. With Russia more menacing than ever, it's gut-check time for NATO.

In this Feb. 27, 2017 file photo, National Governors Association (NGA) Chairman, Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe holds a briefing on Capitol Hill in Washington. Four former sailors who became known as the "Norfolk Four" as they fought rape and murder convictions, saying police intimidated them into falsely confessing to the crimes two decades ago have been pardoned by Gov. McAuliffe on Tuesday, March 21, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File) **FILE**

More bluster from the bag man

If Hillary Clinton had won, Gov. Terry McAuliffe of Virginia might now be in President Clinton's Cabinet. But there is no President Clinton, and there is no Secretary McAuliffe, and the nation's gain is Virginia's loss. His days in Richmond are numbered, but the Old Dominion must endure 10 more months of bluster from Bill and Hillary's longtime bag man.

A modest suggestion to move Congress

Donald Trump, like a lot of Republicans, is mightily disappointed with the Freedom Caucus for blocking repeal of Obamacare, so he has gone to war with the caucus and thinks he can persuade some Democrats to help him repeal Barack Obama's signature "accomplishment." He will learn to his sorrow that this is a recipe for more disappointment. Democrats don't do compromise.

President Donald Trump greets Danish Prime Minister Lars Lokke Rasmussen at the White House in Washington, Thursday, March 30, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Snubbing the White House

It's hard to be friends with someone who doesn't want to be your friend. A clenched fist is a poor return of a hand offered in friendship. Donald Trump, who knows what the Democrats in Congress think of him, nevertheless tried to reach out to the opposition with an invitation to a Senate-only reception in the East Room of the White House.

Eric as Evas Nelson, from Sandwich, Mass., and parents of a transgender child, wait for Boston Mayor Marty Walsh to arrive to raise a flag supporting the transgender community at City Hall, Thursday, March 30, 2017, in Boston. The flag-raising event was organized after the "Free Speech Bus," painted with the words "boys are boys" and "girls are girls," parked outside City Hall earlier in the day. (AP Photo/Bill Sikes)

Queering the numbers

The 2020 census won't ask questions about sexual orientation and gender identity, and the homosexual lobby is infuriated. The National Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) Task Force accuses the Trump administration of nothing short of genocide. "We've been erased!" the task force cried.

Republican leaders Rep. Tim Moore, left, and Sen. Phil Berger, hold a news conference Tuesday, March 28, 2017, in Raleigh, N.C., where they announced they thought they had reached a compromise with Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper on a replacement for HB2. Berger holds papers that he said were the Governor's proposal. The law limits LGBT nondiscrimination protections and requires transgender people to use public restrooms corresponding to the sex on their birth certificate.  (Chris Seward/The News & Observer via AP)

March Madness in the restroom

The National Collegiate Athletic Association, or NCAA, has been overcome by a form of March Madness that has nothing to do with basketball or brackets. It has everything to do with restrooms and political correctness on steroids.

Unleashing American energy

President Trump has nullified many of Barack Obama's climate change fantasies and the sky is still up there. But judging by the uproar from voices in the climate change industry, only an unexpected miracle is keeping the firmament in place. As cooler heads keep an eye on the thermometer in the months and years to come, America can balance legitimate concerns about pollution against the necessity of exploiting affordable energy.

House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., leaves a closed-door strategy session as he works to get past last week's failure to pass a health care overhaul bill and rebuild unity in the Republican Conference, at the Capitol, in Washington, Tuesday, March 28, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Collapse and replace

Congressional Republicans have tried to turn the page on the Obamacare debacle, but the next page has another dismal message. Instead of repeal and replace, Americans face collapse and replace of Barack Obama's health care system. The only uncertainty is how soon and how bad it will be. While the humbled party leaders snipe at each other over what could have been, the nation's health-care system continues to wither at the edges, and sometime soon someone had better be ready with something better.

Paul Krugman accuses reporters of being tougher on Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton than her Republican rival, Donald Trump. (Associated Press/File)

A dunce cap for Paul Krugman

The men and women who pick the winners of the Nobel Prize should come in from the cold — the temperature Tuesday in Oslo was 44 degrees -- and after their brains thaw out they should ask Paul Krugman to send back his Nobel medal, awarded in 2008. Both high and low numbers continue to puzzle the man.