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New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks during a cabinet meeting in the Red Room at the Capitol, Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2015, in Albany, N.Y. Cuomo says he has not been subpoenaed or contacted by federal investigators probing Albany corruption, but he won't say if the same is true for his aides. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)

Saying no to prosperity

If you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em. Or leave ‘em, depending. Several struggling towns in upstate New York look across the state line at Pennsylvania and are thinking about secession, not from the union but from New York. After years of timid waffling, Gov. Andrew Cuomo has said no to fracking, the method of drilling for oil and gas that is making Pennsylvania prosperous. Fracking, or hydraulic fracturing, could be the key to putting a jingle into the pockets of New Yorkers, and improving the state’s dreary and desolate business climate.

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., right, accompanied by Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, outline their ideas for a new tax plan during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March 4, 2015.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Getting started on tax reform

Everybody talks about tax reform but nobody ever gets around to doing something about it. Now two Republican senators, Marco Rubio of Florida and Mike Lee of Utah, have introduced a proposal that embraces both pro-growth and pro-family concerns and simplifies the mess that is the current federal tax code. It’s a start.

In this Jan. 23, 2013, file photo, then-Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, on the deadly September attack on the U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi, Libya, that killed Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and three other Americans. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

Something to hide

There’s a new chapter in the familiar Clinton dodge, this one written by Hillary. On Monday The New York Times reported that Mrs. Clinton stubbornly refused to use a government email account during her tenure as secretary of state, choosing instead a private account to better hide her emails. This likely violates the U.S. Records Act, and we’ve seen this kind of Clinton subterfuge before.

A rendition of a now-scrapped Arlington streetcar line.

No desire for a streetcar

Nearly everybody likes a streetcar, but most of them live only in the memories of old folks. Once upon a time streetcars ran nearly everywhere in nearly every big city in America, and in a lot of not-so-big cities. Two hundred miles of track, for example, tied Washington to its suburbs in Virginia and Maryland.

Addressing a joint meeting of Congress in Washington, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said an emerging U.S.-Iran deal would "all but guarantee" Tehran will get nuclear weapons. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

The Netanyahu speech

Benjamin Netanyahu knocked one out of the park Tuesday, and once it cleared the fence the ball beaned a man lurking in the shadows, and bounced into the tall grass. That man in the shadows looked a lot like President Obama.

Related Articles

A sample of medical marijuana is displayed at a dispensary in Portland, Ore. (AP Photo/Don Ryan, File)

Going to pot in America

Certain Americans have a love-hate relationship with marijuana, and with the pleasure comes the pain. In Colorado, where residents have legalized the euphoria of pot, the unhealthy consequences of it are beginning to emerge. There's a warning for other states in the Rocky Mountain high.

President Obama (Associated Press)

The art of the whopper

Telling lies with statistics is so easy even a politician can do it. An economist named Darrell Huff once wrote a best-seller about it, "How to Lie With Statistics." Harry S. Truman identified three kinds of lies, "lies, damned lies, and statistics." That was more than a half-century ago, and the art and science of prevarication have only been improved through frequent use.

An image provided by Australia's Minister for Health and Aging shows cigarette packaging stripped of all logos and replaced with graphic images that tobacco companies in Australia will be forced to use. (AP Photo/Australian Minister for Health and Aging)

Strike of the soup Nazis

The right of a company to sell a can of beans or a bottle of soda pop — or a pack of cigarettes — with trademarks ablaze is a no-brainer in a land of the free. But such freedom invariably makes a nanny's teeth itch. The Conservative government of Prime Minister David Cameron in Britain can't resist the urge to scratch that familiar itch.

A human embryo generated by SCNT at Advanced Cell Technology in 2003 (Courtesy of Advanced Cell Technology)

When the gene escapes the bottle

The future arrives with such speed as purveyors of science fiction envy. Hence the baby with three parents. Heather can, in fact, have two mommies. Medical science is poised to take a bold step toward a human free of genetic disease, and with it a host of ethical questions about the collateral consequences of the brave new world aborning.

Former President Ronald Reagan. (The Washington Times) ** FILE **

Remembering Ronald Reagan

We once celebrated the birthdays of George Washington and Abraham Lincoln in February, until several national holidays were moved to Mondays so federal workers could get more three-day weekends. Then President Richard Nixon ordered that Washington's birthday still be observed on his birthday. Fervor always cools and now most of the states observe something called "President's Day" on the third Monday of the month, presumably even including Chester Alan Arthur and Rutherford B. Hayes.

Disney reported another quarter of strong growth on Tuesday, Feb. 3, helped by higher revenue from its parks and resorts despite an outbreak of measles at its California park in December. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)

The measles outbreak

Measles is supposed to be dead and gone from the United States, having been declared "eliminated" by the Centers for Disease Control in 2000. But 15 years later, the disease appears to be back, not yet strongly and so far not with a vengeance. But it's back.

The Coastal Plain of Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. (AP Photo/Al Grillo, File)

Drill baby, maybe

When the president announced his ban on oil drilling last month in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, he deprived the nation of access to 30 billion barrels of oil now and took 10 billion barrels of oil from future generations. The trade he offered was meant to help current American energy production efforts. Or so it seemed.

Brothers Ray, left, and Tom Magliozzi, co-hosts of National Public Radio's Car Talk show, pose for a photo in Cambridge, Mass.  (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File) (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)

The unbearable whiteness of being NPR

The folks at National Public Radio are atwitter, and not just on Twitter, about something big and new for everyone to worry about. Some of the executives, producers, on-air "talent" and even some listeners are worried that "the NPR sound" is "too white." Navels all over the building erupted last week with the broadcast of a commentary by one Chenjerai Kumanyika, "Challenging the Whiteness of Public Radio."

This still image made from video released by Islamic State group militants and posted on the website of the SITE Intelligence Group on Tuesday, Feb. 3, 2015, purportedly shows Jordanian pilot Lt. Muath al-Kaseasbeh standing in a cage just before being burned to death by his captors. The death of the 26-year-old pilot, who fell into the hands of the militants in December when his Jordanian F-16 crashed near Raqqa, Syria, followed a weeklong drama over a possible prisoner exchange. (AP Photo/SITE Intelligence Group)

More news from the dark side

When Japanese journalist Kenji Goto was beheaded by ISIS last week, there was wide speculation that Jordanian intervention might spare the life of a second hostage, Moaz al-Kassasbeh, a Jordan Air Force pilot. ISIS militants had captured the pilot when his F-16 crashed in Syria in December during U.S.-led coalition strikes near Raqqa.

President Obama. (AP Photo/Saurabh Das)

Passion for climate change cools

Climate change is becoming a hard sell. When the computer models get the next day's forecast wrong, it's hard to persuade anyone to pay attention to their predictions of what the Earth's climate will be a half-century from now. Saving the world from imaginative calamity and catastrophe is never easy, and President Obama came away from a global-warming sales pitch in India with an echo of what salesmen dread to hear, a slammed door.

The Capitol Christmas tree in 2009. (Peter Lockley / The Washington Times)

Ebenezer Scrooge lives

Americans ought to live forever, with thousands of federal bureaucrats hard at work protecting the health and safety of all God's creatures. The various federal agencies have more than 3,000 rules and regulations now pending, most of them aimed at harassment and health, and the lights stay on late in the imaginations of the folks at the Environmental Protecting Agency, in particular, and at the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), where no doofus idea goes unconsidered.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif. speaks at the Congressional Black Caucus ceremonial swearing-in ceremony, Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015 on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke) ** FILE **

The Democratic hole

Will Rogers, the political humorist from the previous century whose humor derived from actual wit, once observed that he belonged to no organized political party: "I'm a Democrat." Another of his witticisms is good advice for what's left of the political party he was so proud to be a part of: "If you find yourself in a hole, stop digging."

The South Lawn of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Two bites out of the economy

Taxes take a bite out of the economy, but regulations take a bigger one. Congress has surrendered much of its lawmaking authority to the president and a growing swarm of unelected bureaucrats, and regulations are growing faster than ever. The Obama administration thinks this is the way to run an economy. It's actually the way to cripple it.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton.  (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The Hillary tapes

War is a terrible thing, as everyone who has ever been in one can testify, but war can tempt a president, and sometimes merely someone with the itch to be a president, as a way to burnish a warrior credential.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich is traveling the country now as an evangelist for expansion, urging other governors to follow his lead. (AP Photo/James Nord)

John Kasich’s medicine show

Gov. John Kasich of Ohio was one of several Republican governors who agreed in 2013 to accept a grant of federal money under Obamacare to expand his state's Medicaid services. The temporary grant of $2.6 billion, accepted over protests from his legislature, expires this year and Mr. Kasich now wants the legislature to approve taking more Obamacare subsidies to continue to pay for the expansion.

Hillary Rodham Clinton

The baggage of Benghazi

Politics is a rough game. There's no rule that says you can't rough the passer or avoid making hits to the head. There's not even a rule that says it's unfair to take a dispassionate look at the record of a candidate who offers himself — or herself — for president of the United States. This includes a thorough baggage search.

A herd of musk ox graze in an area of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska, known as Area 1002, in this undated file photo. (AP Photo/Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, File)

Playing oil field politics

Americans are back in the automobile showrooms looking for big cars and SUVs, grooving on size, bells and whistles again. The falling price of gasoline has enabled customers to buy what they want, and what they want is often the Belchfire 8 they can afford to drive again (and trying with difficulty to maneuver through narrow streets in the older cities). The falling gasoline prices have put hundreds of dollars in the pockets of Americans, and that's all to the good.

A pedestrian walks in the middle of Seventh Avenue in Times Square, New York, early Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2015.  (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

The Great Blizzard of ’15

Nothing is more tempting to television's talking heads than exaggerating an approaching doomsday of blizzards, droughts, hurricanes, traffic jams, abortion rallies and other disasters, and nothing is riskier for politicians. What was hyped as the Great Blizzard of '15 turned out to be the Usual Snowfall of '15, and now the politicians are squirming under an avalanche of second-guessing.

A college or university degree is not the only route to happiness and success. (AP Photo/Susanne Schafer)

The community college illusion

Two years at a "free" community college may seem appealing to young people, fearful of the future and looking for a route to prosperity, but they will be the first to feel disappointment in President Obama's illusionary community-college-for-all scheme. His proposed $60 billion educational subsidy will inevitably diminish the quality of faculties, prevent promising students from obtaining a suitable education, and do little to provide an entryway into the job market. A college or university degree is not the only route to happiness and success.