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Republicans will soon be empowered to adopt a number of much-needed reforms that will point Congress in the right direction. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

EDITORIAL: Putting momentum in harness

Congressional lethargy and inaction in the wake of the Republican wave of 2010 is not the fault of the Republicans, no matter how loud the cries of frustrated liberals. Over the course of the current Congress, the House of Representatives passed nearly 350 bills, only to see them die in Harry Reid’s Senate. Some of them surely deserved death, but not all.

Mark Petrik and Dennis Smith dig out their south Buffalo driveway on Saturday, Nov. 22, 2014, in Buffalo, N.Y. Western New York continues to dig out from the heavy snow dropped by this week by lake-effect snowstorms. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)

EDITORIAL: The snows of global warming

Pity the plight of upstate New Yorkers, buried under six feet of snow. The folks who dwell in the lee of the Great Lakes are accustomed to deep drifts of white magic in winter, but a winter wonderland doesn’t look so magical when the solstice is still a month away. November is not supposed to behave like January. Some of the global warming “experts” attribute the cause of the early snow to “global warming.”

EDITORIAL: Republicans uphold NSA snooping

Invoking the Constitution is the common rhetoric of many politicians who swore to follow and defend it, but a lot of them have obviously never read it, or if they have, didn’t understand it. The Founding Fathers wrote it in plain English, simple enough for even a lawyer to understand, but some politicians nevertheless have trouble with it.

Earlier this week, President Obama made it clear that he will soon offer some form of limited amnesty to about five million foreign nationals. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

EDITORIAL: Preparing for Obama’s amnesty

The struggle over the future of the nation begins tonight. The Republican Party, finally getting what it wished for, to be the effective counterbalance to the president’s statist agenda, must be ready. Mr. Obama is expected to announce in a nationally televised speech that he will issue an executive order to prevent the deportation of 5 million illegal immigrants and to reward their law-breaking with work permits. The next morning he will use a high school in Las Vegas, teeming with illegal schoolchildren, as the backdrop to argue that “no papers” is no problem as long as he is in the White House.

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FILE - This undated file photo provided by Gilead Sciences shows the hepatitis C medication Sovaldi. Gilead Sciences says it has reached a deal with several generic drugmakers to produce cheaper versions of its popular, expensive hepatitis C drug Sovaldi for use in developing countries. (AP Photo/Courtesy of Gilead Sciences, File)

EDITORIAL: The spreading Obamacare virus

Socialized health care in the United States comes by incrementalism. Obamacare and its exchanges preserve the illusion of a free market for insurance coverage, but we're inching ever closer to the left's dream of "single-payer," a system of one-size-fits-all medical treatment organized by the government.

Rep. Gerry Connolly, D-Va., talks about winning his re-election, at his office in Annandale, Va., on Tuesday, Nov. 9, 2010. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

EDITORIAL: Scholte for Congress

Four years ago, President Obama urged Hispanics to vote to "punish our enemies." The strategy didn't work, and the Democrats lost 63 House seats. Rep. Gerald "Gerry" Connolly of Virginia, a Democrat, nearly became No. 64.

EDITORIAL: Aborting the 'doc fix'

Whether it's the Republicans or Democrats holding their heads high after the election results are tallied late Tuesday night, there will be important work to do when Congress returns from the battlefields at home. At a minimum, Congress must renew the government funding resolution that runs out Dec. 11.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks during a "Women for Maloney" event in Somers, N.Y., Monday, Oct. 27, 2014. Clinton was there to support Rep. Sean Maloney who is running against Nan Hayworth in New York's 18th congressional district. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

EDITORIAL: The politics of pander

A secretary of state could, for example, spark a nasty international incident by mixing up the Republic of China and the People's Republic of China, two nations that don't get along. The "reset button" in U.S.-Russian relations aside, Hillary Clinton's gaffes as the nation's chief diplomat didn't encourage many full-scale invasions.

FILE - In this Thursday, Sept. 25, 2014 file photo, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi addresses business leaders as he launches his "Make in India" initiative, prior to his scheduled departure to the U.S. in New Delhi, India. After months of criticism for not moving aggressively enough on promises of an economic overhaul, Modi, who led his Bharatiya Janata Party to a landslide election win in May, announced a string of policies designed to kick-start Asia's third-largest economy. Over the past week, Modi has unveiled an overhaul of India's archaic labor laws, freed diesel prices from state control and signed an executive order promising to open India's coal industry to private companies. Modi,  on promises that he would re-energize India's stumbling economy, faced a flurry of criticism after his July budget failed to provide new direction.  (AP Photo/Saurabh Das, File)

EDITORIAL: Capitalism's new fans

Capitalism, as a wise man who understood human frailty once said, is a bad economic system. Its only virtue is that it is better than all the other systems. Nevertheless, it has fallen from favor in Washington among those who don't understand human frailty.

FILE - In this July 15, 2014, file photo, Camel cigarettes, a Reynolds American brand, are arranged for a photo in Philadelphia. The nation's second-biggest tobacco company informed employees Wednesday, Oct. 22, that beginning next year, the use of traditional cigarettes, cigars or pipes will no longer be permitted at employee desks or offices, conference rooms, hallways and elevators. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

EDITORIAL: Tobacco neo-Prohibitionists at the U.N.

The world, or a good part of it, struggles to cope with Ebola, and the United Nations continues to be obsessed by tobacco. The World Health Organization, meeting in Moscow, came up with a treaty imposing a global tax on cigarettes and delegates of 179 nations signed it.

EDITORIAL: Bongino for Congress

Democrats in Washington work hard to stoke the flames of resentment against "the rich." Rep. John Delaney is the richest Democrat in Congress, and he's locked in a surprisingly tight race in Maryland's 6th District against Dan Bongino, a former Secret Service agent, the Republican challenger.