Skip to content

Editorials

Featured Articles

Blowing billions

Spending $17.9 trillion is hard work. Dispensing cash at a rate of $1 million per hour would require 2,040 years to rack up a sum as large as the national debt. It’s not that big-spending bureaucrats are lazy, but that their hard work has created their own special expertise at wasting money.

FILE- In this Sept. 10, 2014, file photo, North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory speaks to members of the media in Raleigh, N.C. In a letter dated Oct. 6 to French officials, McCrory said the plain packaging proposal may detract from more effective ways of curbing cigarette use. The French bill requiring neutral cigarette packs by 2016 is slated for debate in French Parliament next year. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)

Races for the statehouse

With little mystery about the prospects of continued Republican control of the House of Representatives, attention is focused on the Senate, where there is a lot of uncertainty. This focus gives short shrift to the important races for the statehouses, where Democrats are looking for bright spots but where the Republicans may produce several surprises.

This undated handout photo provided by Revolution shows Ron Klain, a former chief of staff to Vice President Joe Biden.   A longtime Democratic operative, Klain was tasked Friday by President Barack Obama with running the government's response to the Ebola crisis. (AP Photo/Revolution)

Ebola crisis needs more than a bureaucrat czar

President Obama’s confused and timid response to the Ebola crisis has done nothing to calm the fear that stalks America, and choosing a well-connected Democratic lawyer, lobbyist and what the White House calls “an implementation expert” isn’t likely to make anyone feel better. Ronald A. Klain has no medical, scientific, public health or administrative experience to become the nation’s Ebola czar.

Maryland Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan speaks during his first gubernatorial debate with Democratic candidate, Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, in Baltimore, Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014. (AP Photo/The Baltimore Sun, Amy Davis, Pool)

EDITORIAL: Hogan for governor

Democrats stand at the edge of panic. The miserable economy, a president who retreats from challenge to lead from behind and the failure of the federal government to deal responsibly with the Ebola crisis all undermine faith in the party of more and bigger government. In a state that runs deep blue, a Republican has a shot at taking the Maryland governor’s mansion.

This undated image released by Bronner's Christmas Wonderland shows a Halloween-themed tree displayed at Bronner's Christmas Wonderland, a large Christmas store in Frankenmuth, Mich. So-called holiday creep, where the traditions one special occasion are embraced by another, now extends to Halloween. (AP Photo/Bronner's Christmas Wonderland)

EDITORIAL: Decking the halls with regulation

The Christmas season brings no joy to a bureaucrat. There’s no heart for good will to appeal to. Banning things is what sets hearts afire in the Obama administration. The president most recently chased away the humble light bulb, the work of Thomas Edison a century ago, and replaced it with a pale substitute laced with deadly mercury. Only green fanatics were pleased.

Related Articles

Supporters of the No vote in the Scottish independence referendum circle round a flare as they gather to celebrate the referendum result in George Square, Glasgow, Scotland, Friday, Sept. 19, 2014.  Following a long night that brought floods of relief for some and bitter disappointment for others, Scotland awoke with a hangover Friday after voting to reject independence.  Now, the task was to heal the divide — and use the energy the referendum unleashed to hold London politicians to promises of more powers for Scotland.  (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

EDITORIAL: Scotland, saved from secession

The Scots thought twice about independence, and did the right thing. They preserved the United Kingdom as we know it and saved themselves and the world from a lot of grief that would have inevitably spilled into unexpected places.

EDITORIAL: Why militarize the schools?

But peer pressure, bullying and ambition for good grades aren't the sort of minefield California's schools apparently fear most. They're getting ready for the real thing, deploying mine-resistant vehicles, or MRAPs, against the day an invading army lays a booby trap on the playground.

**FILE** Sen. Orrin Hatch, Utah Republican, addresses a crowd during the Utah Republican Party nominating convention, in Sandy, Utah, on April 26, 2014. (Associated Press)

EDITORIAL: The monument man, by executive order

The federal government already owns most of the land in Utah, and Mr. Obama has his eye on a prime parcel of 1.4 million acres near the Canyonlands National Park. With a wave of his autopen, he can banish development, declaring the Greater Canyonlands a "national monument."

Illustration on tax code complexity by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

EDITORIAL: Dealing with a disgraceful tax code

Millions of Americans entrust their financial information to private accountants, lest they fill out the dreaded 1040 tax form on their own. When things go wrong, and they're overcharged, they sometimes lodge a complaint with the Internal Revenue Service.

Member of Parliament and Shadow Secretary of State for International Development, Jim Murphy, speaks from a soapbox in support of the Union on the final day of his 100 Streets in 100 Days Better Together tour, in Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow, Scotland, Saturday Sept. 13, 2014. Scotland will vote in an independence referendum on September 18. (AP Photo/PA, Jane Barlow)  UNITED KINGDOM OUT  NO SALES  NO ARCHIVE

EDITORIAL: A historic vote for Scotland

Scotland the brave, the ancestral home of millions of the sturdiest and most independent of Americans, will vote Thursday whether to secede to become once more an independent nation. The United Kingdom would be united no more.

GETTY IMAGES
From left, Sens. Thomas R. Carper of Delaware, Evan Bayh of Indiana and Blanche Lincoln of Arkansas are among the members of the newly formed Moderate Dems Working Group. The group of 15 will meet to focus on legislative battles, such as the president's $3.6 trillion budget proposal.

EDITORIAL: A 51st-state fantasy

Senate Democrats who are anxious about their re-election prospects in November are puzzled that Sen. Thomas R. Carper of Delaware, a Democrat, is pushing the fantasy of statehood for the District of Columbia so close to the November elections.