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  • This image released by Paramount Pictures shows Russell Crowe as Noah in a scene from the film, "Noah." (AP Photo/Paramount Pictures, Niko Tavernise)

    EDITORIAL: Tinkering with the Bible

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Most of the religious folk who have seen previews of Hollwood's latest attempt to tell a familiar Bible story haven't been impressed. "Noah" sails into town Friday, yet the tepid response to the big-budget epic shows again that Tinseltown is so wrapped up in a political agenda that it has difficulty telling a good story. Published March 21, 2014

  • What Fed Says: Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen announces that the outlook for growth and jobs is the same as it was late last year. Story, A5. (Associated Press)

    EDITORIAL: The Great Enabler

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Federal Reserve chairmen are experts at talking up a storm without providing even a sprinkle of information. The Fed's new leader, Janet Yellen, is no exception. She says she'll consider "a wide range of information" to determine the central bank's policies in the days ahead. Whatever that means. Published March 21, 2014

  • FILE -  In this Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014 file photo, former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell makes a statement as his wife, Maureen, listens during a news conference in Richmond, Va. The former first lady of Virginia and her husband, former Gov. Bob McConnell, have been indicted on several counts of trading on their influence to enrich themselves and family members. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)

    EDITORIAL: Innovative cronies

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Budget season is here, and an endless stream of lobbyists are making their annual pilgrimage to Capitol Hill to beg for alms. It's something the transportation industry does well, considering that the promise of eliminating potholes pleases everybody but mechanics and tire salesmen. Published March 21, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Federal posers

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Nothing shouts success quite like a private jet. Rap musicians like Lil Wayne boast of the "G5 sitting on the runway," the Gulfstream V executive jet that's a perk that comes with topping the charts and pumping out platinum albums. It costs $40 million to buy a G5, but if you have to ask how much it costs to keep it flying, you can't afford it. Published March 20, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Obamacare, Phase 2

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Single-payer health care is the left's holy grail. The term is a euphemism for replacing private insurers with a powerful government that prescribes the medicine and pays the bills. It's how Britain and Canada do it, and soon, the idea could spread to Vermont, where the state Senate Finance Committee plans to vote Friday to advance "Green Mountain Care" to march the state yet closer to the single-payer dream. Published March 20, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Bribe time again

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    When a public official is caught on tape taking a bribe, it's usually only a matter of time before he can expected to be fitted in an orange jumpsuit. In one famous corruption sting that began in 1979, FBI agents pretended to be Middle Eastern sheiks handing out bribes to a United States senator, five members of the House and several members of the Philadelphia city council. With dramatic video footage, all were convicted. Published March 20, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: ATF gone wild

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    When President Obama rewrote inconvenient parts of his very own Obamacare law, he undermined more than health care. The attitude of "we can do what we want" trickles down to the lowliest federal agencies. That's what several federal judges are saying about the schemes of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF). Published March 19, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: A nominee for the cartoons

    By

    In Harry Reid's Senate, it's difficult for one of President Obama's appointments to be too radical to win confirmation. But such might be the fate of Dr. Vivek Murthy, whose prognosis for confirmation as surgeon general is grim. So far, Mr. Reid can't muster 50 commitments for a favorable vote in a body controlled by 55 Democrats. Published March 19, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Broccoli to save the planet

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    The White House pastry chef has had all he can take. After constant badgering from First Lady Michelle Obama about draining the cream filling from his eclairs and substituting arugula for frosting, Bill Yosses resigned. "I don't want to demonize cream, butter, sugar and eggs," he said. Published March 19, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Iran's busy hangmen

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    The hangman is out of work in most of the West. Even in the United States, where several states are searching for more "compassionate" ways to kill, capital punishment is not as popular as it used to be. Published March 18, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Endangered Democrats racing to the exits

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    President Obama continues to fall in the polls, to a new low as measured by The Wall Street Journal/NBC News. Whether for his foreign or domestic performance, the public judges the president harshly. He has fallen so far, to 41 percent approval in this latest poll, that loyal Democrats are having unhappy thoughts. Published March 18, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: The dubious apocalypse of global warming

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    The world isn't warming. The Climate Depot website obtained the latest satellite measurements and found the Earth's thermostat hasn't budged since September 1996. Published March 18, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Obama's great Internet giveaway to ICANN

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Open communication on the Internet has allowed free men and women to paint the globe with the liberating message of democracy. Tyrants, despots and charlatans, large and small, understand they can no longer get away with concealing the truth as they once did. Published March 17, 2014

  • LETTER TO THE EDITOR: No peace for Ukraine, but a piece for Russia

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Most likely, the United States and Europe will not further intervene in Eastern Europe, and Ukraine, like the country of Georgia earlier, will lose a good portion of its sovereign territory guaranteed it under the 1994 Budapest Memorandum signed by signatories from Ukraine, Russia, Britain and the United States. Published March 17, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Keep St. Patrick's Day parades free of gay politics

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    New York City's St. Patrick's Day paraders stepped off Monday without the participation of liberal Mayor Bill de Blasio, and few noticed or cared. Published March 17, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Obama's chickens roosting in Ukraine

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Barack Obama's chickens are roosting in Crimea, and the noisy flapping is likely to expand soon. Published March 17, 2014

  • LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Bureaucratic dysfunction is a worldwide problem

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Upon leaving his position at the Department of Health and Human Services, Director of Office of Research Integrity David Wright wrote in his resignation letter that the job was the worst one he had ever had. Published March 17, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Women unseen on silver screen?

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Global warming had to be renamed climate change because the globe wasn't warming. Now affirmative action, with its accompanying percentages, quotas, goals and timetables, suffers from bad press and has been recast as "diversity." Published March 14, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Working overtime to stifle job growth

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Who needs Congress? President Obama, who has rewritten Obamacare several times to tweak it to the political needs of the moment, signed a memorandum Thursday ordering Department of Labor Secretary Thomas E. Perez to "streamline" the Fair Labor Standards Act so that more white-collar employees would be eligible for overtime pay. Published March 14, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Obama's undiplomatic envoy picks draw surprising critics

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Foggy Bottom is not a redoubt of right-wing conservatives. Republican presidents do send over the names of a handful of political friends as ambassadorial candidates, but they're usually "short timers" intended to serve only through the end of an administration. Published March 14, 2014

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