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Henry Ford

The right to the fruits of our labor

When you get a whole country — as did ours — thinking that Washington is a sort of heaven and behind its clouds dwell omniscience and omnipotence, you are educating that country into a dependent state of mind, which augurs ill for the future. Our help does not come from Washington, but from ourselves; our help may, however, go to Washington as a sort of central distribution point, where all our efforts are coordinated for the general good. We may help the Government; the Government cannot help us. The slogan of “less government in business and more business in government” is a very good one, not mainly on account of business or government, but on account of the people. Business is not the reason why the United States was founded. The Declaration of Independence is not a business charter, nor is the Constitution of the United States a commercial schedule.

In this Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014, photo, a McDonald's Big Mac sandwich is photographed at a McDonald's restaurant in Robinson Township, Pa. McDonald's saw a key sales figure drop in the U.S. again in February 2014, as the world's biggest hamburger chain struggles to beat back competition and adapt to changing eating habits. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

The Democrats’ unhappy meal

Burger King’s retreat to the Great White North reveals the consequences of setting the tax rate too high. The iconic Florida-based fast-food chain intends to merge with Tim Horton’s, the equally iconic coffee-and-doughnuts chain in Canada. The resulting burger and doughnuts conglomerate would be based in Ontario, where taxes are reasonable.

Stephen Colbert arrives at HBO's Post Emmy Awards reception on Monday, Aug. 25, 2014 in West Hollywood, Calif. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP)

Twits in pursuit of Twitter

To rescue the nation from “political misinformation” and “hate speech,” the U.S. government is spending nearly a million dollars to look into how animated cat images spread across the Internet do harm. At best, it’s a waste of time. At worst, it’s a tool to suppress free speech.

Abusing the language

Intolerance is nothing to sneeze at. Neither is a sneeze. Kendra Turner, 17, a student at Dyer County High School in Newbern, Tenn., found that out the hard way when she was sent off to the principal’s office. She had said “bless you” when a fellow student sneezed in class.

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