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D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser speaks Jan. 2, 2015, after taking the oath of office at the District of Columbia Mayoral Inauguration ceremony at the Convention Center in Washington. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Mayor Bowser’s all-inclusive budget

Knockoffs of the State of the Union addresses are all the rage now — we’re waiting for someone to make a State of the Precinct Address. Mayor Muriel Bowser delivered her first State of the District Address this week, and, following script, there was a recitation of the accolades bestowed on the nation’s capital. We’re cool with foodies, the tech community, the entrepreneurs and the city is in the top five cities in new construction.

FILE  In this March 31, 2015 file photo, President Barack Obama speaks in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. President Barack Obama on Wednesday authorized a new U.S. government approach to deterring cyberattacks: financial sanctions against malicious overseas hackers and companies that knowingly benefit from the fruits of cyber espionage.  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

Going green with the globalists

The jolly green giant has a fan in the White House. President Obama has signed us up to salute the United Nations’ climate change agenda. By pledging allegiance to the Global Climate Treaty, the president won’t actually accomplish much in weather control beyond enriching the likes of Al Gore and his friends in the renewable energy industry. Playing God is just another day in the Oval Office for the spender in chief, but it requires the American taxpayer to worship with dollars at the altar of environmental extremism.

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence speaks question during a news conference, Tuesday, March 31, 2015, in Indianapolis. Pence said that he wants legislation on his desk by the end of the week to clarify that the state's new religious-freedom law does not allow discrimination against gays and lesbians. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

Bad faith in Indiana

The row over Indiana’s religious liberty law breaks new ground in the war between religious liberty and the liberal political agenda. If there’s no conflict, you have to make one up. This contretemps blew up out of nowhere, and inquiring minds want to know how and why it happened.

FILE - In this May 5, 2014, file photo, the U.S. Capitol building is seen through the columns on the steps of the Supreme Court in Washington. The House is poised to act on a bill that would temporarily patch over a multibillion-dollar pothole in federal highway and transit programs while ducking the issue of how to put the programs on sound financial footing for the long term. The bill by House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Dave Camp cobbles together $10.8 billion in pension tax changes, customs fees and money from a fund to repair leaking underground fuel storage tanks to keep the federal Highway Trust Fund solvent through May 2015. A similar bill is pending in the Senate.  (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

A challenge to Congress

When Richard Nixon signed the legislation establishing the Environmental Protection Agency in 1970, he was praised for his vision and commitment to conservation “going forward,” though that cliche had yet to be coined. A few critics — “outliers,” in another cliche waiting to be born — warned that the EPA could grow into a nightmare of a bureaucracy, but no one paid attention. Jeremiahs are rarely popular at the picnic.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu chairs the weekly cabinet meeting in Jerusalem on Sunday, March 29, 2015. Netanyahu said he has "deep concern" over a pending nuclear deal the West appears close to signing with Israel's arch-enemy Iran. (AP Photo/Dan Balilty, Pool)

Virginia’s lawyers scratch Israel

This is the season for despising Israel and the Jews. The terrorists of Hamas dispatch agents of evil into the country bent on mayhem and sabotage. Palestinians fire rockets at Israeli children from launchers stationed at schools, hospitals and other places where they can find protection among the children, the lame, the halt and the helpless. President Obama contributes tone and tint to the campaign, determined to reward Iran with a sweetheart deal to protect its nuclear-weapons program, which it has promised to use to wipe Israel and the Jews “off the face of the earth.” Mr. Obama, bent on revenge for censure and criticism, merely wants to wipe the Israeli prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, off the face of Israel.

Related Articles

Vice President Joseph R. Biden. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan)

Joe Biden’s Santa Claus trip

Vice President Joe Biden goes to Central America next month to meet the leaders of several crime- and poverty-plagued nations, and he's taking millions of dollars to hand out along the way, like a rich tourist from el norte. Disaster is written on the wind from the north.

President Obama . (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Wary of 'comprehensive' patent reform

Compromise and a willingness to put partisan and ideological interests aside in the name of the common good nearly always sounds good. But it's wise to be wary. "The common good" is often good mostly for the clever, the selfish and those with the best lawyers and brightest lobbyists.

FILE - This Feb, 19, 2012 file photo shows the Volkswagen logo on the hood of a 2012 Beetle at a Volkswagen dealership in the south Denver suburb of Littleton, Colo. Volkswagen on Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014 announced it is recalling 442,000 Jettas and Beetles to fix a problem that can cause rear suspension failure if the cars aren't fixed properly after a crash. The recall covers 2011 through 2013 Jettas and 2012 through 2013 Beetles. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)

The Chattanooga Boo-Hoo

Valentine's Day marked the first anniversary of the defeat of an attempt by the United Auto Workers to organize the Volkswagen plant in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The Detroit-based union spent years and millions of dollars trying to organize workers at the German-owned factory on the Tennessee-Georgia border, and lost decisively in an election supervised by the National Labor Relations Board.

In this image released by Warner Bros. Pictures, Kyle Gallner, left, and Bradley Cooper appear in a scene from "American Sniper."  The film is based on the autobiography by Chris Kyle. (AP Photo/Warner Bros. Pictures)

Me$$age from the box office

The movie "American Sniper" passed $300 million in box-office receipts last weekend, on pace to become the top-grossing R-rated film ever. The enormous appeal of Clint Eastwood's movie about the life and military career of Chris Kyle, a U.S. Navy SEAL marksman, naturally puzzles Hollywood liberals who think they understand America. They'll have something to talk about at the 87th Academy Awards gala Sunday night.

President Obama. (Associated Press)

Obama's amnesty express

The temporary injunction issued Monday in Texas, barring the Obama administration from proceeding with the president's amnesty for millions of illegal aliens, halted the amnesty express. But the order is only an obstacle, and the crucial word here is "temporary." U.S. Judge Andrew S. Hanen's order has been appealed by the U.S. Justice Department, and the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans might very well alter it, tweak it or suspend it. Judge Hanen did not rule on the merits of the lawsuit brought by Texas and supported by 25 other states.

Farmworkers pick paper trays of dried raisins off the ground and heap them onto a trailer in the final step of raisin harvest.  (AP Photo/Gosia Wozniacka, File)

Raisins get their day in court

The humble raisin — a grape left too long in the sun — is about to get its day in court. The U.S. Supreme Court has taken a case fraught with questions about economic freedom, the guarantee of private property and the rights set out in the Fifth Amendment, and at bottom it's about a few raisins and the farmers who harvested them.

The  Maryland State House dome standing above buildings in Annapolis.  (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Protecting aging senators

Anything goes, we suppose, in politics as in love and war. Life expectancy in the United States now stands at 78.8 years, and Maryland Democrats, stung by losing the governorship last November, are trying to change the rules of Senate succession to protect their aging senators.

Businesses are fleeing California's high taxes and strict regulations. (AP Photo/Lansing State Journal, Rod Sanford)

Fleeing California

More than a century ago, Roy Farmer, 20, went door-to-door in Los Angeles with his bags of home-roasted coffee beans. By the 1930s, Farmer Brothers was selling coffee to restaurants throughout the nation. Today the company employs 1,200 men and women and generates $200 million in annual sales to restaurants, convenience stores, hospitals, hotels and universities.

Ivanpah solar energy project (Sandia National Laboratories' website)

No rival for the lightning bug

Everybody likes the sun. The rays feel good and they're free for everyone. Nobody likes the sun more than the promoters of solar electricity. These so-called "green energy companies," however, are anything but free, and have collected, on average, $39 billion a year in federal subsidies in the six years and counting of the Obama administration. They haven't produced enough electricity to match the glow of a lightning bug's bottom.

Smoke billows from the coal-fired Merrimack Station in Bow, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole, File)

Mischief with factoids

Facts are facts, as any reputable scientist would tell you, and if someone tries to change them, like changing a pair of soiled pants, they risk embarrassing exposure. The global warming hysteria is premised on "facts" showing the earth is warming, but these "facts" have been repeatedly exposed as "factoids," the playful invented word of novelist Norman Mailer, to describe something that is presented as fact, sounds like it could be a fact, but is actually not a fact. Surely imposing global restrictions on human activity, which would deny prosperity to the poorest among us, must be premised on something better than factoids.

How conservatives trump the pity party

William Voegeli's "The Pity Party: A Mean-Spirited Diatribe Against Liberal Compassion" is required reading for all political animals.

King Salman gestures of Saudi Arabia. (AP Photo/Saudi Press Agency, File)

Shaming Saudi Arabia

The example set by the early Americans who met in Philadelphia to write a Constitution for free men continues to be a beacon to "the huddled masses yearning to breathe free," in the words of the poet Emma Lazarus. We, the most fortunate of men and women, sometimes forget the debt everyone owes to the men who understood that all men are equal in the eyes of the Creator, and deserve to be treated with dignity and respect by their governments. The yearning for freedom to speak their minds, write what they want and circulate their opinions, burns in the hearts of men and women everywhere.

Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber kisses his fiancee, Cylvia Hayes, after he is sworn in for an unprecedented fourth term as governor in Salem, Ore. Kitzhaber announced his resignation Friday, Feb. 13, 2015, amid allegations Hayes used her relationship with him to enrich herself.  (AP Photo/Don Ryan, File)

More rain in Oregon

Times have been tough for Democratic governors. Republicans in November ousted Democrats in Maryland and Massachusetts, both blue-state strongholds, and now another Democratic governor, this one in Oregon, where the election results can't get a deeper shade of blue, is out. The influence-peddling scandal that took him down further threatens his fiancee and the reputation of a major donor whose billions are beloved by Democrats.

Victims of the Fort Hood shooting will soon be eligible to receive the Purple Heart, with Congress pushing ahead with a policy change that would officially recognize domestic terrorism as an issue, rather than the "workplace violence" designation the Obama administration had used. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Reality in purple

The lady with the scale of justice makes a belated appearance in Washington. The victims of the Fort Hood massacre are finally to receive their due. They're due as well an acknowledgment by the commander in chief that they were the prey of terrorists. We're not holding our breath, and neither should they. President Obama continues to hide in a game of words.

To avoid the economic, social, environmental and human health catastrophes that would follow fossil fuel elimination, we would need affordable, reliable options on a large enough scale to replace them. Existing "renewable" technologies cannot possibly do that. (AP Photo/Andy Wong, File)

Hydrocarbon Appreciation Day

Fossil fuel antagonists have devised numerous schemes, campaigns and justifications to curb or eliminate hydrocarbon energy. Their latest gambit is Global Divestment Day, Feb. 13-14, dedicated to pressuring institutions to eliminate fossil fuel companies from their investment portfolios.

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

The hogs squeal

Losing is no fun, in baseball, football and particularly in politics. Maryland's Democrats, who have been in a surly mood since losing the statehouse to Larry Hogan in November, might better have followed the example of Davy Crockett to relieve their anger and frustration. When his Tennessee constituents threw him out of Congress after only one term, Davy told them: "I'm going to Texas, and you can go to hell."

Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Tom Wheeler. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)

Rogues at the FCC

The 332 pages of new regulations for the Internet, revealed last week by the Federal Communications Commission, demonstrate vividly how a federal bureaucracy, if left alone without proper supervision, puts obstacles in the way of the economic sector. It's instinctive. The instinct to impose bureaucratic harm is exacerbated when an agency feels the pressure of an overzealous White House.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. (AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner, Pool)

Bibi-bashing hypocrisy

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu tells it like it is, clear and plain with the bark on, and sometimes says things that politicians in Israel and other places know is true but won't say. Barack Obama thinks he can sleepwalk on an imaginary high road past Iran's nuclear-weapons program, and Mr. Netanyahu's plain talk makes it difficult to stay asleep.

In this photo taken Feb. 9, 2015, President Barack Obama listens in the East Room of the White House in Washington. The president is setting a goal of raising $2 billion from the private sector for investments in clean energy. The White House says it's launching a Clean Energy Investment Initiative as part of the Obama administration's effort to address climate change.The Energy Department will solicit investments from philanthropists and investors concerned about climate change. The aim is to spur development of technologies and energy sources that are low in carbon dioxide pollution, such as solar panels, wind power, fuel cells and advanced batteries. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Barack Obama’s happy planet

From George Washington on, presidents have blamed "them lyin' newspapers" for their problems, and often for the problems they create. And not just presidents; governors, mayors and even aldermen play the national political sport. The villains now include television and the Internet.

The University of Michigan. (Wikipedia)

Nice speech on campus

The unwary, which includes most of us, should step lively if stumbling onto the campus of the University of Michigan. You might offend by saying "good morning" to someone who is having an awful morning. Your obliviousness to the pain of others would be unforgivable, if not yet illegal.