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The war with the wrong man

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is the stand-up guy in the Trump administration. He lent legitimacy and seriousness to the Trump campaign when no other Republican in the Senate would get within 20 feet of the Donald. He has lent similar seriousness and magisterial grace to an administration that so far has had little of that.

FILE - In this Sunday, June 11, 2017 file photo, Equality March for Unity and Pride participants march past the White House in Washington. Most LGBT-rights activists never believed Donald Trump's campaign promises to be their friend. With his move to ban transgender people from military service on Wednesday, July 26, 2017, on top of other actions and appointments, they now see him as openly hostile. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Keeping the military fit and ready

President Trump reversed his predecessor’s foolishly sentimental policy on Wednesday that opened the military services to transgender soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines. He reversed it because it was the right thing to do.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Kentucky Republican, hasn't said which alternative to Obamacare will lead the amendment process in the GOP's bill. (Associated Press)

Wasting away on Obamacare

The sad Obamacare saga continues, like a particularly weepy soap opera. The U.S. Senate voted Tuesday to open debate on the latest Republican attempt to repeal and replace, which was a procedural victory for the Republicans, and even that required the vice president to break a tie vote. Meanwhile, a badly broken health care system continues to leak dollars by the billions.

A billboard welcomes Pope Francis, at St. Mark's Cathedral in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, April 27, 2017. On Friday, Francis is scheduled to begin a two-day pilgrimage to Egypt aimed at lifting the spirits of Christians in the Middle East, whose numbers have rapidly dwindled in recent decades due to war, displacement and emigration. The visit will include a meeting with Egypt's president and the Grand Imam of Al-Azhar as well as a Mass in a stadium on the outskirts of Cairo. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)

The war against the Christians

Persecution of Christians continues in certain parts of the world, mostly in the Middle East and throughout South and Southeast Asia, but it rarely gets much attention even in the Western media. Even many churchmen in the West turn a blind eye.

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President Donald Trump speaks in the Diplomatic Room of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, June 14, 2017, about the shooting in Alexandria, Va. where House Majority Whip Steve Scalise of La., and others, where shot during a Congressional baseball practice. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

A shooting war on Republicans

The only person responsible for shooting up a congressional baseball practice Wednesday in Alexandria, wounding a Republican congressman and several aides, is James Thomas Hodgkinson, 66, of Belleville, Ill. He died of a gunshot wound, but it was brought on by the rage in Democratic ranks of Trump Derangement Syndrome.

In this May 21, 2017, file photo provided by The Public Theater, Tina Benko, left, portrays Melania Trump in the role of Caesar's wife, Calpurnia, and Gregg Henry, center left, portrays President Donald Trump in the role of Julius Caesar during a dress rehearsal of The Public Theater's Free Shakespeare in the Park production of Julius Caesar in New York. Teagle F. Bougere, center right, plays as Casca, and Elizabeth Marvel, right, as Marc Anthony. Delta Air Lines is pulling its sponsorship of New York's Public Theater for portraying Julius Caesar as the Donald Trump look-alike in a business suit who gets knifed to death on stage, according to its statement Sunday, June 11, 2017. (Joan Marcus/The Public Theater via AP)

The high price of free speech

The First Amendment is the most precious of all the rights enumerated in the Constitution, and it's a pity that Americans actually know so little about it. The First Amendment guarantees the right of Americans to say whatever they please, even the ugly and the irresponsible, but it does not guarantee there won't be a price to pay for saying certain things.

Tom Kalasho, founder and CEO of the National Organization of Iraqi Christians, gets emotional during a protest Monday, June 12, 2017 in Sterling Heights, Mich.  The arrests of dozens of Iraqi Christians in southeastern Michigan by U.S. immigration officials appear to be among the first roundups of people from Iraq who have long faced deportation, underscoring rising concerns in other immigrant communities.  (Todd McInturf/Detroit News via AP)  /Detroit News via AP)

Immigration policy by body count

Certain black-robed sentinels of the law have taken up the task of defending the nation from its enemies, declared and otherwise. This is a responsibility previously left to the president of the United States. If a wooden gavel is all that stands in the way of evildoers, Americans should be afraid, very afraid.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is sworn-in on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 13, 2017, prior to testifying before the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing about his role in the firing of James Comey, his Russian contacts during the campaign and his decision to recuse from an investigation into possible ties between Moscow and associates of President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Life in the dead end

The Democrats are addicted to cotton candy, and there's no scarcity of cotton candy on the Washington midway. But once someone bites into a cloud of cotton candy, the cloud dissolves in a flash, leaving only a splash of goo.

Ice Cube attends a ceremony honoring him with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on Monday, June 12, 2017, in Los Angeles. (Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP)

An angry cloud of snowflakes

Into each life a little rain must fall, as ancient wisdom teaches, and sometimes, when the season is right, the rain turns to snow. Many of these precious snowflakes fall on campus, but not all, and sometimes the snowflakes (mostly fragile millennials who imagine themselves, like snowflakes, unique) fall on unlikely places. Southern California is the last place to expect a heavy snowfall, but it happens. We can blame President Trump, apparently not global warming.

FILE - In this Friday, June 9, 2017 file photo, Iranians attend the funeral of victims of an Islamic State militant attack, in Tehran, Iran. Its strongholds in Iraq and Syria slipping from its grasp, the Islamic State group threatened to make this years Ramadan a bloody one at home and abroad. With attacks in Egypt, Britain and Iran among others and a land-grab in the Philippines, the group is trying to divert attention from its losses and win over supporters around the world in the twisted competition for jihadi recruits. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi, File)

Terror turnaround in Tehran

Terrorism is a scourge born in an evil place in the heart, extinguishing hope and breeding cynicism like little else. Now that the Islamic Republic of Iran has felt the lash of wholesale murder, perhaps the hard-hearted mullahs will reconsider their "holy" war against the world. Pigs, not necessarily the favorite animals of the followers of Muhammad, will sooner fly.

FILE- In this Friday, May 26 2017 file photo, a man stands next to flowers for the victims of Monday's bombing at St Ann's Square in central Manchester, England, Friday, May 26 2017. British police say everyone arrested over the Manchester concert bombing has been released without charge, but detectives are still not sure whether the attacker had accomplices. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti, File)

The Tory disaster in Britain

Theresa May is hanging on as the prime minister in Great Britain, but her grip is slipping and the Tories are trying to get a blood transfusion from a tiny fourth (or maybe fifth) party from Northern Ireland, just to survive.

Former FBI Director James Comey recounts a series of conversations with President Donald Trump as he testifies before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 8, 2017. Comey alleges Trump repeatedly pressed him for his "loyalty" and directly pushed him to "lift the cloud" of investigation by declaring publicly the president was not the target of the probe into his campaign's Russia ties. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Winners, losers and factoids

Sorting out the winners and losers in the James Comey soap opera is almost as much fun, for media groupies, as the hearing itself. Whether the sacked FBI director repaired his reputation, or Donald Trump was severely damaged by having mean things said about him, depends, as always, on partisan point of view.

Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard Burr, R-N.C., right, and Vice Chairman Mark Warner, D-Va., confer as former FBI director James Comey testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 8, 2017.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

When not to roll over the opposition

When Sen. Harry Reid detonated the "nuclear option," eliminating filibusters against nominations of federal district and appellate court judges, he was confident that Democrats would retain their Senate majority in 2014 and hold the White House in 2016, for as long as the wind blows and the rivers run to the sea.

In this combination photo, President Donald Trump, left, appears in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington on May 10, 2017, and FBI Director James Comey appears at a news conference in Washington on June 30, 2014.  Comey is making his first public comments since being fired by President Donald Trump and, according to his prepared remarks, will talk about the president's efforts put the investigation behind him. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, left, and Susan Walsh, File)

Mr. Comey's big day

America will be all ears when James Comey opens up Thursday about his conversations with President Trump and allegations that the Russians interfered with the 2016 election. Whatever he says, the Never-Trumpers will nod that their worst suspicions have been confirmed, that the commander in chief is a Manchurian candidate with a thing for Russia. Perhaps Mr. Comey will persuade everyone that there is, after all, a "there" there. So far there's no fire, no smoke, only a vapor produced by heavy breathing.

London Mayor Saqiq Khan faces a flurry of questions during an appearance on "Good Morning Britain," June 6, 2017. ("Good Morning Britain" screenshot)

A 'decapitation' roils Britain on election eve

Britain finally votes on Thursday, and Theresa May and the Conservatives, who expected to win a landslide when the prime minister called this "snap election" six weeks ago, are expected to stumble across the finish line 5 points ahead of the Labor Party.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn waves from his battlebus after a speech during General Election campaigning in Telford, England, Tuesday, June 6, 2017. The British election will take place on Thursday, June 8. (Ben Birchall/PA via AP)

'Enough is enough'

"Enough is enough," says Britain's prime minister, Theresa May. With only hours to go before the British national parliamentary elections on Thursday, and with rescue workers still looking for bodies from the latest terror outrage, Mrs. May has discovered "Islamist extremism."

President Donald Trump signs an executive order in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Friday, Feb. 3, 2017. Trump signed an executive order that will direct the Treasury secretary to review the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial oversight law, which reshaped financial regulation after 2008-2009 crisis. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais) ** FILE **

Dumping Dodd-Frank

Rewarding success and punishing failure is the best way to ensure more of the first and less of the second. That's common sense, but Congress has a knack for spreading confusion. The Obama-era financial services law called Dodd-Frank was intended to prevent financial practices that triggered the Great Recession of 2008, but its mountains of regulations have picked the pockets of consumers rather than protecting them. An opportunity is at hand to restore balance between freedom and responsibility in the marketplace.

President Donald Trump speaks at an Air Traffic Control Reform Initiative event in the East Room at the White House, Monday, June 5, 2017, in Washington. Also pictured background from left, former Transportation Secretaries Elizabeth Dole, and James Burnley and Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) (Associated Press)

The romance of the 'resistance'

Democrats write off President Donald Trump's concerns about leaks, anonymous statements to the press, and other malfeasance by Obama holdovers and career bureaucrats inside the government, as merely the paranoid ramblings of someone who has no right to the job he was elected to hold. They're attempting nothing less than to nullify the election.

Security staff check people arriving for the One Love Manchester benefit concert Sunday June 4, 2017, for the victims of last month's Manchester Arena terror attack at the Emirates Old Trafford, Manchester, England. The attack at Ariana Grande's concert last week killed over 20 people and injured dozens of others, many of them teenagers. The singer returned to Britain on Friday ahead of the concert to benefit victims and their families. (Owen Humphreys/PA via AP)

Reasonable questions for visitors

The White House has introduced a new questionnaire for visa applicants that asks for more detailed information about who they are. Applicants for permission to enter the United States are to be asked to provide consular officials with a list of all the names they've used on social media for the past five years. This is a reasonable request for information that would give the U.S. government ways to check for ties to terrorist organizations and clues to behavior that indicates risk to America.

In this Sunday, May 21, 2017 photo released by the Saudi Press Agency, from left to right, Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sissi, Saudi King Salman, U.S. First Lady Melania Trump and President Donald Trump, visit a new Global Center for Combating Extremist Ideology, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. (Saudi Press Agency via AP)

One small step for mankind

Donald Trump thinks big. Ambition large and small stirs in the presidential breast. Even his meanest critics, skeptical of what his ambitions are, give him that. The largest of those ambitions now is to do something to eliminate the radical Islamic terrorism that has set the world aflame.

"Why aren't the same standards placed on the Democrats. Look what Hillary Clinton may have gotten away with. Disgraceful!" President Trump tweeted Wednesday. (Associated Press/File)

18 reasons why Hillary lost

Hillary Clinton continues to discover how she failed twice to become "the inevitable president," the second time by blowing the election that all the politicians, pundits, pollsters and consultants said she couldn't lose. Hillary has developed a special gift at this.

President Donald Trump speaks about the shooting and explosion in Manila, Thursday, June 1, 2017, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Getting to the bottom of Covfefe

Everyone wants to know what Donald Trump's "covfefe" tweet was about, and a few codebreakers think they have figured it out. White House sources, for the record, concede that it is indeed code, and the people the president wanted to reach know the code.