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Bargain-hunting motorists willing to drive to another state can save up to 10 percent on Black Friday shopping.(AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)

When black turns to blue

Black Friday bargain hunters are scouring circulars and combing through websites in search of ways to save on Christmas shopping, and many of them are missing a bargain they could get by driving to shops and stores in states with low — or no — sales taxes.

Renting government workers

Union membership has fallen, but the impact of public-sector unions on federal politics still seems as strong as ever. How could this be? It sounds like a mystery, but it isn’t.

Illustration: Thanksgiving prayer by Linas Garsys for The Washington Times

Grand’ther Baldwin’s Thanksgiving

When you’ve dined at Grandma Baldwin’s you will know as well as I. When, at length, the feast was ended, Grand’ther Baldwin bent his head, And, amid the solemn silence, with a reverent voice, he said: “Now unto God, the Gracious One, we thanks and homage pay, Who guardeth us, and guideth us, and loveth us always!”

FILE - In this June 16, 2014 file photo, demonstrators chant pro-Islamic State group slogans as they carry the group's flags in front of the provincial government headquarters in Mosul, 225 miles (360 kilometers) northwest of Baghdad. The Islamic State group holds roughly a third of Iraq and Syria, including several strategically important cities like Fallujah and Mosul in Iraq and Raqqa in Syria. (AP Photo, File)

EDITORIAL: ISIS is the enemy

Chuck Hagel will soon leave his post as secretary of defense, but the threat from the barbarians grows. The threat from the Islamic State, or ISIS, looming over Iraq and Syria and the entire Middle East is compounded by the Obama administration’s confusion and cultivated weakness. Nobody with a clear understanding of what the world is about is in charge of the nation’s security.

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President Paul Kagame of Rwanda, left, meets with United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on the sidelines of the 69th session of the U.N. General Assembly at U.N. headquarters, Sept. 27, 2014. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

EDITORIAL: Africa needs a hand up, not more U.N. handouts

Leaders from 140 world nations will gather in New York City this week for the meetings of the U.N. General Assembly, to sit still to be "inspired" by the theme of "Delivering on and Implementing a Transformative Post-2015 Development Agenda." Translated from bureaucratese, the official language of the U.N., that means, "We want you to raise your taxes and impose more regulations --- for your own good."

FILE - In this March 20, 2009 file photo David Bossie, leader of Citizens United and producer of "Hillary: The Movie", is seen in his office in Washington. Hillary: The Movie" is returning to the Supreme Court for a limited engagement and with the chance to overhaul laws governing federal campaigns ranging from the White House to the halls of Congress. The justices were hearing arguments in the case Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2009, for the second time. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

EDITORIAL: The return of Citizens United

How did a robust and skeptical state like Colorado, with a century-long history of electing conservatives and Republicans, turn so blue with the 2008 election? That's the subject of "Rocky Mountain Heist," a documentary by the advocacy group Citizens United.

EDITORIAL: Making war on supercars

The bureaucrats at the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration have obviously seen too many gangster movies. Parents everywhere can sleep soundly now that the Obama administration has protected their children from the menace of the trunks in supercars.

Supporters of the No vote in the Scottish independence referendum circle round a flare as they gather to celebrate the referendum result in George Square, Glasgow, Scotland, Friday, Sept. 19, 2014.  Following a long night that brought floods of relief for some and bitter disappointment for others, Scotland awoke with a hangover Friday after voting to reject independence.  Now, the task was to heal the divide — and use the energy the referendum unleashed to hold London politicians to promises of more powers for Scotland.  (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

EDITORIAL: Scotland, saved from secession

The Scots thought twice about independence, and did the right thing. They preserved the United Kingdom as we know it and saved themselves and the world from a lot of grief that would have inevitably spilled into unexpected places.