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Two years after Obamacare opened for business, Mr. Obama's health care scheme isn't exactly solving the problem every American must deal with. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

Doubling down on disaster

President Obama is for choice and competition in the health-insurance market, as befits a champion of the free market, except when he isn’t. “My guiding principle is, and always has been,” he said in 2009 when he was trying to sell Obamacare, “that consumers do better when there is choice and competition. That’s how the market works. In Alabama, almost 90 percent of the market is controlled by just one company. And without competition, the price of insurance goes up and quality goes down.”

Gov. Terry McAuliffe, the new Democratic governor, no fan of the civility-in-government movement, calls Mr. Black's measure "counterproductive and mean-spirited" and had threatened to veto it if the legislation passed. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Breaking the law is no solution

No one would reward a shoplifter just because he manages to get out of the store with stolen merchandise, but every Democrat in the Virginia state Senate — and one Republican — voted last week to reward those who broke into the country illegally and get a valuable public benefit.

President Obama gives his State of the Union address before a joint session of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015 (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Three cheers for gridlock

Gridlock became a dirty word in Washington after the Republicans regained the majority in the House of Representatives and stood in the path of the invader from Fantasy Island, shouting “Stop!” The president wanted a rubber stamp, and the Democrats agreed, demanding of the Republicans, “Why can’t you be like us?”

Chloe Kim competes during the women's snowboarding superpipe final at the Dew Tour iON Mountain Championships in Breckenridge, Colo.  (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, File)

Snow jobs in the mountains

Once upon a time the inquisitive and the young, the reckless and the incurably naive wore their convictions on the rear bumpers of their Volkswagen Beetles: “Question authority.” Time marches on. Now those purveyors of rebellion have become the authority, and they want no further questions. “Shut up,” they advise.

Ms. Lynch is a tough prosecutor, more lawyer and prosecutor than politician, and thus very different from the man she is to replace. (Associated Press)

Questions for Loretta Lynch

Loretta Lynch, the president’s nominee to replace Eric Holder as the U.S. attorney general, faces question-and-answer time next week, and this will be the first opportunity for the new Republican majority to demonstrate that there’s a new and more just world on Capitol Hill. She will not necessarily face a hostile panel of the Senate Judiciary Committee, nor should she. She is a known quantity as U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of New York, first appointed by President Clinton and reappointed by President Obama.

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In this Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014, file photo, former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg smiles prior to be conferred with the Chevalier de la Legion d'Honneur by France's Foreign minister Laurent Fabius, at the Quai d'Orsay, in Paris. Britain's Queen Elizabeth II has bestowed an honorary knighthood on the billionaire businessman and former New York mayor. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus, File)

EDITORIAL: Bloomberg's wasted millions

Mike Bloomberg put $50 million into Tuesday's elections, and he doesn't have much to show for it. Someone, perhaps the Koch brothers, ought to treat him to a Big Gulp. The onetime mayor of New York City organized a group called Everytown for Gun Safety, meant to rival the National Rifle Association, and with a lot more money. The new group was supposed to put gun control on the front burner. Instead, the gun-control candidates got scorched on the back burner.

** FILE ** Sen. Harry Reid. (Associated Press)

EDITORIAL: Harry Reid's last hurrah

Congress will convene soon as a convention of lame ducks, and ducks usually don't do much. Five senators who were just escorted to the door will have the opportunity to cast one last vote for Harry Reid. The Republicans should know better than to allow these disgruntled few to make mischief. They'll clock out at the first opportunity.

Former President Ronald Reagan. (The Washington Times) ** FILE **

EDITORIAL: The Wall came tumbling down

When President Reagan traveled to Berlin to mark the 750th anniversary of the city, celebrated at the Brandenburg Gate in front of the Berlin Wall, the most consequential line in his memorable speech nearly didn't make it into the final draft.

Maryland Gov.-elect Larry Hogan speaks at a news conference, Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2014, in Annapolis, Md. Hogan campaigned relentlessly against tax increases and stuck to a pro-business message to win a big upset against Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown in the race for governor in heavily Democratic Maryland. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

EDITORIAL: The Republican wave

Pollsters everywhere are wiping egg from their faces, and a lot of the egg is scrambled. They predicted Republicans would have a good night, but their numbers were about as accurate as the television weatherman's 10-day forecast.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., celebrates with his supporters at an election night party in Louisville, Ky.,Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014. McConnell won a sixth term in Washington, with his eyes on the larger prize of GOP control of the Senate. The Kentucky U.S. Senate race, with McConnell, a 30-year incumbent, fighting off a spirited challenge from Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes, has been among the most combative and closely watched contests that could determine the balance of power in Congress. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

EDITORIAL: Now, to lead

Midterm elections are about incumbent presidents even when they aren't on the ballot. President Obama acknowledged this when he declared that "every single one" of his policies would be up for a vote Tuesday even though his name wouldn't be on anybody's ballot. On election eve, the White House hedged with the claim that since many of the closest Senate races were in states Mr. Obama didn't carry two years ago the results had to be taken with salt.

A nurse holds a dose of experimental vaccine "cAd3-EBOZ Lau" at the Lausanne University Hospital (CHUV) in Lausanne, Switzerland, Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014. Swissmedic approved the application for a trial with an experimental Ebola vaccine at the Lausanne University Hospital (CHUV). It will be conducted on 120 volunteer participants. The trial continues the series that began in the USA, the UK and Mali. The vaccine, based on a genetically modified chimpanzee adenovirus will initially be administered to healthy volunteers who will be deployed as medical staff in the fight against the Ebola epidemic in West Africa. (AP Photo/Keystone,Jean-Christophe Bott)

EDITORIAL: Beware the Ebola snake-oil remedies

The quality of mercy is always strained, but snake oil comes raw and unfiltered, harvested from ever more lethal snakes. You might think the accounts of the suffering of those stricken with the Ebola virus would soften the hearts of snake-oil salesmen.