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  • Former Vice President Al Gore.

    EDITORIAL: Music for the polar vortex

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Everyone (well, nearly everyone) has been wondering whatever happened to Al Gore, and whether he's still in the global-warming business. We can reliably report that yes, he is. A reporter ran into him the other night in Kansas City, where everything, even Al, is up to date and Al is peddling a new and improved line of snake oil. Published February 24, 2014

  • Democratic U.S. Rep. Gary Peters, left, campaigns for Michigan's new 14th district congressional seat at St. Paul A.M.E. Church in Detroit. (AP Photo/Detroit Free Press, Susan Tusa)

    EDITORIAL: Cornered by Obamacare

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Like a cornered animal, Democrats threatened by Obamacare are turning vicious. One Democratic congressman, now running for the U.S. Senate, last week threatened to use a federal agency to drive a television station out of business if it allowed a cancer patient to share her story of how Obamacare took away her insurance. Published February 24, 2014

  • Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro speaks next to a painting of the late Hugo Chavez, during a news conference at Miraflores Presidential Palace in Caracas, Venezuela, Friday, Feb. 21, 2014. Speaking Friday to international media, Maduro called out what he said was a "campaign of demonization to isolate the Bolivarian revolution." (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)

    EDITORIAL: Socialist Venezuela runs out of money

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Venezuela once exported more oil than almost any other country. Now it can't even keep the lights on. A nation rich in natural resources scrambles to find enough toilet paper. Published February 21, 2014

  • MILLER: San Diego won’t appeal 9th Circuit on concealed carry

    By Emily Miller - The Washington Times

    The decision by Sheriff Gore not to appeal is likely because anti-gun jurisdictions don’t want the Supreme Court to weigh in on carry rights and stop all “may issue” state laws. Published February 21, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Union thuggery in Philadelphia

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Burning down a church strikes most Americans, including dissenters and nonbelievers, as a crime beyond comprehension. But the FBI last week provided the evidence to charge 10 members of a Philadelphia ironworkers union with torching a Quaker church. Published February 21, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Kochs vs. Steyer: When 'evil' campaign cash is OK

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Democrats love to throw mud balls at the Koch brothers — David and Charles — because they're successful entrepreneurs, and they're generous with groups that promote the free-market values that enabled them to succeed. Published February 21, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: A fishy drought in California, made worse by a smelt

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    President Obama's traveling golfing circus and global-warming revival played California's San Joaquin Valley last week, where he used the worst drought in decades as a backdrop to shill for his magic elixir guaranteed to cure warts, relieve irregularity, conjure water and expand government spending. He correctly blames man for the drought, but it's not the men in pickup trucks or astride John Deere tractors. Published February 20, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: The FCC’s great government newsroom intrusion

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has bestirred the sleeping media to the threat to life as we know it. The FCC wants to embed government researchers on newsroom floors to track how newspapers, radio and television stations select stories and cover the news. Published February 20, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Obama's EPA colludes with radical environmentalists

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    President Obama's campaign promise of an "all of the above" energy policy has vanished more quickly than his promise to enable everyone to keep a favorite doctor or a preferred health plan. Published February 20, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Facebook’s gender confusion

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    The late novelist Kurt Vonnegut was a man ahead of his time when he observed, "A sane person, to an insane society, must appear insane." Only a society that has lost its marbles would find the need to enumerate more than four dozen "genders" above and beyond the trusty male and female options. Published February 19, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Connecticut gun owners revolt

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Laws are more than just symbolic gestures. Connecticut's General Assembly must come to grips with this truth before its recent effort to "save lives" ends up destroying them. Published February 19, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Minimum wage, maximum damage

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Hold on to your wallet. President Obama is calling on Congress to "give America a raise." Mr. Obama is never so generous as when he's spending someone else's money. Published February 19, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: A UAW defeat in Chattanooga

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES - The Washington Times

    The bullies failed. Assembly-line workers at the Volkswagen assembly plant in Chattanooga, Tenn., told the United Auto Workers last week to take an outbound Chattanooga choo-choo back to Detroit. Published February 18, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Gillespie gaining on Warner in Senate race in Va.

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES - The Washington Times

    The race for the U.S. Senate in Virginia looks like a barnburner. In one corner stands Mark R. Warner, the incumbent, former telecommunications entrepreneur, one-term governor, former state Democratic chairman and the newest member of the Senate Finance Committee. In the other, Ed Gillespie, former chairman of both the Republican National Committee and the party in Virginia, political adviser to presidents and a successful businessman who has never held elective office. Published February 18, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Eric Holder courts the cellblock vote

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Ever in search of new voting blocs, the administration is making felony disenfranchisement its latest cause. Felons who have served their time in prison are now to be called "returning citizens." Published February 18, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Mr. Kerry's costly fantasies on global warming

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    When John F. Kerry complains of too much warming, it's usually to tell his driver to turn down the heat in the heated leather seats in the back seat of his limousine. Over his weekend in Asia, Mr. Kerry said the eruption of Indonesia's Mount Kelud was a consequence of the planet's looming fever. Published February 17, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: The unhappy anniversary of stimulus boondoggle

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Five years ago this week, President Obama jump-started the economy, leading to the greatest period of sustained growth in history. No, we haven't seen it, either, but that was what he said would happen when he signed into law the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. A trillion dollars later, we're no better off. Published February 17, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Peepholes into private lives

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Pity the blind pursuers of intelligence. Smart devices like smartphones, smart cars and smart meters come with sensors that gather useful information. The latest phones have built-in fitness apps that track calories consumed and steps taken to do something about it. Published February 17, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Another good day for the Second Amendment

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    We live in strange times. Sometimes the recognition of the obvious becomes a cause for celebration. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco, the most liberal appeals court in the nation, has declared that "the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed." Published February 14, 2014

  • EDITORIAL: Judges legislating 'morality' on same-sex marriage

    By THE WASHINGTON TIMES

    Not so long ago the Constitution got respect. But now, not so much. President Obama is on his way to repealing the separation of powers, and the 10th Amendment is on life-support, ignored by federal judges who know better than the legislatures of Utah, Oklahoma, Kentucky and Virginia. Published February 14, 2014

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    The basket was full until the IRS got hold of it.

    Illustration by Dana Summers of the Tribune Media Services

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