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Recent but undated handout photo issued on Friday July 22, 2016 by William and Kate, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, of Britain's Prince George with the family dog Lupo, at Sandringham in Norfolk, England. Prince George celebrates his third birthday on July 22, 2016. (Matt Porteous/Handout via AP)

An awful crime in Blighty

There’s a new crisis in Old Blighty. Prince George, son of the duke and duchess of Cambridge and grandson of Queen Elizabeth II, could soon be a common felon, and he’s not quite 3 years old. It’s not likely, but you never know. There’s photographic proof that he committed a dastardly deed.

President Barack Obama pauses while speaking to members of the media in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Monday, June 13, 2016, after getting briefed on the investigation of a shooting at a nightclub in Orlando by FBI Director James Comey, Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson, and other officials.  (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Barack Obama, the condolence man

President Obama tries to project a sunny outlook on the world, mostly by denying that anything bad is happening anywhere. But he’s having a hard time of it staying ahead of the radical Islamic terrorists who, he says, don’t really exist.

Within hours of his speech, Sen. Ted Cruz was fundraising off it, vowing that his own political movement will continue. He still has two years left before he needs to seek re-election to the Senate. (Associated Press)

Ted Cruz and an act of betrayal

Ted Cruz might have thought he was opening his 2020 campaign for president with his remarkable snub of the party and its nominee for president, but he was more likely making a deal with the undertaker.

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Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at Williamson Health and Wellness Center in Williamson, W.Va., Monday, May 2, 2016. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Hillary steps off the reservation

Words, words, words. Words are the evil that makes life miserable. Some people think if only we could abolish words, everyone would live in perfect peace, happy harmony and sweet silence. Hillary Clinton demonstrated the other day just how destructive words can be. She thought she was needling her wayward husband, and it turned out she was cutting herself.

President Barack Obama speaks at the International Jazz Day Concert on the South Lawn of the White House of the Washington, Friday, April 29, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Obama's legacy in the Pacific

Among the reliable allies of the United States in the modern era, dating from the end of World War II and the arrival of the Cold War in Asia, few have been more reliable than Japan. Friendship between Japan and the United States remains the keystone of American strategy for peace and stability in the region.

Lipstick for a pig

This is the age of euphemy, and sophomores rule. Nobody can screw up the courage to say what he means, and even if he could he had better not. Political correctness has something to do with it, but mostly it's an inability to confront reality, and the language reflects that. The evidence lies all about. There are no more dead-end streets, but streets with No Outlet.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign stop at Old National Events Plaza, Thursday, April 28, 2016, in Evansville, Ind. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

Looking for Trump's world

Donald Trump's foreign policy speech this week astonished some of his snarky critics who were surprised that he had a foreign policy, beyond building a wall on the Rio Grande and sending the bill for it to Mexico. What they got was what he has been saying for months, in coherent language more easily committed to the teleprompter that presidents and prime ministers rely on.

Taiwan can mediate

The tensions in Asia are bound to undergo changes ("An American 'wall of missiles' to deter China" Web, April 25), but there is a mediator available to ease these in the South China Sea. Instead of positioning the arsenal platforms to counter China, Washington should take a close look at Taiwan's role within the region and determine how Taiwan can unravel the dangerous escalation in U.S.-China relations.

A plate of food is shown with candles and wine. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)

Taking Nanny to dinner

Expanding waistlines are the price Americans pay for the horn of plenty. The nanny lurking in the shadow of big government reckoned that she can help the greedy shed the extra pounds by ordering restaurants to offer menus that clearly label nutritional content. Experience shows it probably won't work, and coaxing diners to order smaller portions might.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign stop Wednesday, April 27, 2016, in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

A 'presidential' Trump

Donald Trump declared victory in the wake of his impressive five-state sweep through the "Acela Primary" (aka, the "I-95 primary)" so called because the primaries were in the states along the route of both the highway and Amtrak's signature fast train. The Donald's declaration might not reflect mathematical accuracy, and his nomination might not yet be inevitable, but it was the right campaign politics.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel briefs the media after a visit at Germany's Joint Terrorism Defense Center GATZ (Gemeinsames Terrorismusabwehrzentrum), in Berlin, Tuesday, April 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber, Pool)

Nothing for the Europeans

Angela Merkel, Germany's long-serving chancellor, speaks carefully with Teutonic precision. In her conversations with President Obama on his visit to Britain and Europe she spoke with a certain plaintive tone, seeking reassurance that America hasn't really withdrawn from the leadership on which Europe has relied for 75 years.

Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington on June 10, 2015. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Obamacare on the skids

Names identify people, places and things, but sometimes, particularly in politics, a name can be a disguise. After six years, the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, has been fully unmasked. It's clearly not affordable, either for a person seeking health insurance, companies that sell insurance coverage, or the U.S. government. It's a telling symbol of President Obama's dysfunctional leadership.

Supporters of House Bill 2 gather at the North Carolina State Capitol in Raleigh, N.C., Monday, April 11, 2016, during a rally in support of a law that blocks rules allowing transgender people to use the bathroom aligned with their gender identity. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

Blues in the toilet

''Growing up" once meant learning to use your head, appreciating the common sense that seeing is believing. Now a boy can stand in front of a mirror and see a girl, and vice versa. But when the mind refuses to accept what the eyes see, the path ahead leads to self-delusion, which has become the national sport.

US President Barack Obama, right, talks to Britain's Queen Elizabeth II as he arrives at Windsor castle, England, Friday, April, 22, 2016. Obama and First lady Michelle Obama had a private lunch with Britain's Queen Elizabeth II at Windsor castle. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant, Pool)

Obama gets the hook

It's hardly "racist" to notice that Barack Obama's two least-favorite nations are Israel and Great Britain, although anyone who makes that observation risks being denounced as a bigot. From the day he occupied the Oval Office the president has made it abundantly clear that he has no particular affection for the "special relationship" that has tied the United States and Britain together in a bond through winning two world wars.

President Barack Obama with Cuban President Raul Castro prepare to shake hands at their joint news conference at the Palace of the Revolution, Monday, March 21, in Havana, Cuba. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Popping the Cuban balloon

There's an old Russian proverb that if you spit in the face of a weakling he will give thanks for the rain. This should be a Cuban proverb, to describe Barack Obama's not such an excellent adventure to Havana. Raul Castro, the Cuban president, did everything short of expectoration to make the American president grovel for the regime's affections.

This image provided by the Library of Congress shows Harriet Tubman, between 1860 and 1875. (H.B. Lindsley/Library of Congress via AP)

No whitewash for Harriet Tubman

Sometimes the government does the right thing for the wrong reasons. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew's decision to put Harriet Tubman's face on the nation's currency was the right thing to do, even if it was done as a way to demote Andrew Jackson, the nation's seventh president, to the back of the bill.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a rally, Thursday, April 21, 2016, at the Pennsylvania Farm Show Complex and Expo Center in Harrisburg, Pa. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

Another 'teaching moment' missed

Donald Trump's most important contribution to the presidential campaign is his brisk and bold challenge to the political correctness that is strangling the body politic, and he made the full-throated challenge when no other politician, Democrat or Republican, dared do it. A vibrant democracy depends on every citizen's respect for the right of everyone to express an opinion, particularly if the opinion is unpopular.

In this Dec. 7, 1941 file photo, part of the hull of the capsized USS Oklahoma is seen at right as the battleship USS West Virginia, center, begins to sink after suffering heavy damage, while the USS Maryland, left, is still afloat in Pearl Harbor, Oahu, Hawaii. A sailor killed in the attack on Pearl Harbor is being buried with full military honors nearly 75 years after the bombing. Machinist's Mate 1st Class Vernon Luke of Green Bay, Wisconsin is being buried at a veterans cemetery in Honolulu on Wednesday, March 9, 2016. (U.S. Navy via AP, File)

The more things change ...

The French, as usual, have a word for it, and sometimes more than one word: "The more things change, the more they are the same." After the cataclysmic destruction of World War II the optimists thought the patterns of political life were changed forever. Nothing of the old could remain.

Warming up to the Earth

There's more than one way to answer the call of nature, and it isn't necessary to await the arrival of Earth Day to demonstrate a reverence for the blue-hued orb we call home.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign event at Stephen Decatur High School, Wednesday, April 20, 2016 in Berlin, Md. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Waking up to reality

The Republican establishment woke up Wednesday morning to the reality it has dreaded, that the party might soon have to practice thinking positive thoughts about Donald Trump. The losers on Tuesday could start by cooling the doomsday rhetoric, understanding that they might have to eat some of the harsh words they have been saying about him.

Supporters of fair immigration reform gather in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, Monday, April 18, 2016. The Supreme Court is taking up an important dispute over immigration that could affect millions of people who are living in the country illegally. The Obama administration is asking the justices in arguments today to allow it to put in place two programs that could shield roughly 4 million people from deportation and make them eligible to work in the United States. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

When immigration law is 'upside down'

Americans can disagree over whether President Obama has fulfilled his promise of fundamental "hope and change," but it's the showdown over immigration policy that may determine whether he leaves as his legacy a fundamentally transformed America.

A demonstrator protests the Federal Reserve's failure to bail out Puerto Rico outside International House in New York on April 7, 2016. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Saving Puerto Rico

The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico is a small island, population 3.5 million, but it's counting on Washington thinking that the commonwealth, like Wall Street banks and Detroit automobile manufacturers, is too big to fail. Decades of out-of-control management has pushed it to the brink of financial collapse.