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Hillary Rodham Clinton

The baggage of Benghazi

Politics is a rough game. There’s no rule that says you can’t rough the passer or avoid making hits to the head. There’s not even a rule that says it’s unfair to take a dispassionate look at the record of a candidate who offers himself — or herself — for president of the United States. This includes a thorough baggage search.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich is traveling the country now as an evangelist for expansion, urging other governors to follow his lead. (AP Photo/James Nord)

John Kasich’s medicine show

Gov. John Kasich of Ohio was one of several Republican governors who agreed in 2013 to accept a grant of federal money under Obamacare to expand his state’s Medicaid services. The temporary grant of $2.6 billion, accepted over protests from his legislature, expires this year and Mr. Kasich now wants the legislature to approve taking more Obamacare subsidies to continue to pay for the expansion.

A pedestrian walks in the middle of Seventh Avenue in Times Square, New York, early Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2015.  (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

The Great Blizzard of ’15

Nothing is more tempting to television’s talking heads than exaggerating an approaching doomsday of blizzards, droughts, hurricanes, traffic jams, abortion rallies and other disasters, and nothing is riskier for politicians. What was hyped as the Great Blizzard of ‘15 turned out to be the Usual Snowfall of ‘15, and now the politicians are squirming under an avalanche of second-guessing.

A herd of musk ox graze in an area of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska, known as Area 1002, in this undated file photo. (AP Photo/Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, File)

Playing oil field politics

Americans are back in the automobile showrooms looking for big cars and SUVs, grooving on size, bells and whistles again. The falling price of gasoline has enabled customers to buy what they want, and what they want is often the Belchfire 8 they can afford to drive again (and trying with difficulty to maneuver through narrow streets in the older cities). The falling gasoline prices have put hundreds of dollars in the pockets of Americans, and that’s all to the good.

Ali Khamenei, the mullah who is the supreme leader of Iran, tells his Twitter followers that "This barbaric, wolflike & infanticidal regime of #Israel which spares no crime has no cure but to be annihilated." (AP Photo/Office of the Iranian Supreme Leader, File)

Playing the fool’s game

The clock is ticking on efforts to halt Iran’s quest for the bomb, and time is running out. When it does, the folly of allowing a rogue state to threaten the Middle East — and the world — with the bomb will be exposed in stark and horrifying relief. Neville Chamberlain was the face of appeasement in the 20th century; Barack Obama would be that face in the 21st.

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FILE - In this undated file photo released by Forest Guardians, a prairie dog eats in southwestern Utah. Cedar City residents who say prairie dogs are overrunning parts of their town are set to argue Thursday, Sept. 11, 2014 against federal regulations protecting the animals. Residents suing in federal court say the prairie dogs have done damage to the city's golf course, airport and at the cemetery, even interrupting funerals with their barking. (AP Photo/Forest Guardians, File)

EDITORIAL: Dogging it on the prairie

Prairie dogs, with more important things to do, don't engage in interstate commerce. That was the finding of a federal judge last week in a decision that could unravel the Endangered Species Act and restore a little respect for private property.

Former President Ronald Reagan. (The Washington Times) ** FILE **

EDITORIAL: The Wall came tumbling down

When President Reagan traveled to Berlin to mark the 750th anniversary of the city, celebrated at the Brandenburg Gate in front of the Berlin Wall, the most consequential line in his memorable speech nearly didn't make it into the final draft.

** FILE ** Sen. Harry Reid. (Associated Press)

EDITORIAL: Harry Reid's last hurrah

Congress will convene soon as a convention of lame ducks, and ducks usually don't do much. Five senators who were just escorted to the door will have the opportunity to cast one last vote for Harry Reid. The Republicans should know better than to allow these disgruntled few to make mischief. They'll clock out at the first opportunity.

In this Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014, file photo, former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg smiles prior to be conferred with the Chevalier de la Legion d'Honneur by France's Foreign minister Laurent Fabius, at the Quai d'Orsay, in Paris. Britain's Queen Elizabeth II has bestowed an honorary knighthood on the billionaire businessman and former New York mayor. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus, File)

EDITORIAL: Bloomberg's wasted millions

Mike Bloomberg put $50 million into Tuesday's elections, and he doesn't have much to show for it. Someone, perhaps the Koch brothers, ought to treat him to a Big Gulp. The onetime mayor of New York City organized a group called Everytown for Gun Safety, meant to rival the National Rifle Association, and with a lot more money. The new group was supposed to put gun control on the front burner. Instead, the gun-control candidates got scorched on the back burner.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., celebrates with his supporters at an election night party in Louisville, Ky.,Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014. McConnell won a sixth term in Washington, with his eyes on the larger prize of GOP control of the Senate. The Kentucky U.S. Senate race, with McConnell, a 30-year incumbent, fighting off a spirited challenge from Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes, has been among the most combative and closely watched contests that could determine the balance of power in Congress. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

EDITORIAL: Now, to lead

Midterm elections are about incumbent presidents even when they aren't on the ballot. President Obama acknowledged this when he declared that "every single one" of his policies would be up for a vote Tuesday even though his name wouldn't be on anybody's ballot. On election eve, the White House hedged with the claim that since many of the closest Senate races were in states Mr. Obama didn't carry two years ago the results had to be taken with salt.

Maryland Gov.-elect Larry Hogan speaks at a news conference, Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2014, in Annapolis, Md. Hogan campaigned relentlessly against tax increases and stuck to a pro-business message to win a big upset against Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown in the race for governor in heavily Democratic Maryland. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

EDITORIAL: The Republican wave

Pollsters everywhere are wiping egg from their faces, and a lot of the egg is scrambled. They predicted Republicans would have a good night, but their numbers were about as accurate as the television weatherman's 10-day forecast.

A nurse holds a dose of experimental vaccine "cAd3-EBOZ Lau" at the Lausanne University Hospital (CHUV) in Lausanne, Switzerland, Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014. Swissmedic approved the application for a trial with an experimental Ebola vaccine at the Lausanne University Hospital (CHUV). It will be conducted on 120 volunteer participants. The trial continues the series that began in the USA, the UK and Mali. The vaccine, based on a genetically modified chimpanzee adenovirus will initially be administered to healthy volunteers who will be deployed as medical staff in the fight against the Ebola epidemic in West Africa. (AP Photo/Keystone,Jean-Christophe Bott)

EDITORIAL: Beware the Ebola snake-oil remedies

The quality of mercy is always strained, but snake oil comes raw and unfiltered, harvested from ever more lethal snakes. You might think the accounts of the suffering of those stricken with the Ebola virus would soften the hearts of snake-oil salesmen.