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Recep Tayyip Erdogan (AP Photo)

Turkey’s erratic Erdogan government flirts with China and the Islamists

The course of Turkey hangs on the outcome of the elections June 7, but there’s more than provincial interests at stake. President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, eager to transform his nation as well as his presidency, is reaching for more power. His erratic public statements and policy feints in all directions have weakened Turkey’s bonds with NATO allies in Western Europe, already wary of taking Turkey into the pact as a full-fledged member of the European Union.

President Obama will ask Congress for $2 billion to deal with the crisis that has seen thousands of unaccompanied children, mostly from Central America, illegally surge across the U.S.-Mexico border.  (AP Photo/Eric Gay, Pool)

Disorder on the border

Texas is flooded, and it’s not just the water. The state has been inundated with illegal immigrants surging across its border, egged on by President Obama’s unprecedented grant of amnesty to millions who have no right to be here. Though powerless to stop the rain, a federal court has reinforced a legal barrier meant to stem the flow of humanity that threatens chaos in Texas and other border states. The tide of lawlessness may be turning.

Policing for profit

Reform of civil-forfeiture laws is an idea whose time has come. This is an issue that unites conservatives and liberals, Republicans and Democrats. FreedomWorks, on the right, and the Center for American Progress, on the left, invited writers, bloggers and think-tank analysts to a daylong conference the other day to talk about abuses of civil-forfeiture, which the Heritage Foundation rightly calls “a legal tool that allows law enforcement officials to seize property that they assert has been involved in certain criminal activity.”

FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2013 file photo, then-Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks at the State Department in Washington. On Friday, the State Department posted 296 Benghazi-related emails from Hillary Clinton's private server.  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

Let’s see the server

There’s a media consensus that there’s no “smoking gun” in the emails that Hillary Clinton, the former secretary of State and presidential candidate, has “persuaded” the department she presided over for so long to release to the public.

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President Barack Obama closes his eyes and bows his head as Dr. Joel C. Hunter, senior pastor of Northland, A Church Distributed, in Longwood, Fla., says the prayer during the Easter Prayer Breakfast, Monday, April 14, 2014,  in the East Room of the White House in Washington. President Barack Obama honored those killed in a weekend attack on two Jewish facilities in Kansas, saying no one should have to worry about their security while gathering with their fellow believers. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Of love and faith

The silly season arrives early. The world's on fire, and here we are, arguing over whether Barack Obama loves America, or loves it enough, and the political correspondents are parsing Scott Walker's answer to a question posed by the armchair theologians at The Washington Post, whether the president is a Christian.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. (Associated Press)

Obama’s signature gift for Iran

President Obama yearns for a "signature" accomplishment overseas to match his signature domestic achievement as the presidential legacy he leaves on Jan. 20, 2017. He's racing toward a nuclear deal with Iran that would give him a foreign disaster to match the domestic disaster called Obamacare.

Republican governors are blaming President Barack Obama for a budget standoff that threatens a potential Department of Homeland Security shutdown. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The villain of the shutdown

Mitch McConnell is desperately seeking a way out of the corner he painted for himself. The Republican leader of the Senate promised the public two things last November. He said there would be "no government shutdown on my watch," and that he would use the appropriations lever to force President Obama to "move to the center" on several crucial issues, including immigration.

A bill by Rep. Matt Salmon, Arizona Republican, would amend the Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 to require a member or representative of a household that receives such benefits to show photographic identification at grocery stores when using a food stamp electronic benefits transfer card, or debit card. (Associated Press)

Charity by fraud

Food stamp fraud is a scandal that should give every taxpayer, Democrat, Republican or rogue of no particular partisan persuasion, a severe case of indigestion. Rep. Matt Salmon, Arizona Republican, wants to take a bite out of it.

A woman wearing a mask to protect herself from pollutants walks on a pedestrian bridge as buildings at Beijing's Central Business District (Associated Press)

The clean air force

Air is essential — a couple of minutes without it is proof enough — and clean air is the best kind. While we're breathing, most of us prefer that the air we inhale is clean. The air in much of China, for example, is so foul there's a growing business for taking tourists to Taipei or Manila on what are called "breathing tours."

Mayorkas Time Bomb Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The ticking time-bomb for Hillary

ABC News Chief Investigative Reporter Brian Ross just wanted to ask a few questions but when he recently stopped Deputy Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro N. Mayorkas, a burly guard for Mr. Mayorkas put his palm in Mr. Ross' face to make it clear that there would be no answers that day. ABC News' camera crew caught the deputy secretary ducking away.

President Obama . (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Wary of 'comprehensive' patent reform

Compromise and a willingness to put partisan and ideological interests aside in the name of the common good nearly always sounds good. But it's wise to be wary. "The common good" is often good mostly for the clever, the selfish and those with the best lawyers and brightest lobbyists.

Vice President Joseph R. Biden. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan)

Joe Biden’s Santa Claus trip

Vice President Joe Biden goes to Central America next month to meet the leaders of several crime- and poverty-plagued nations, and he's taking millions of dollars to hand out along the way, like a rich tourist from el norte. Disaster is written on the wind from the north.

In this image released by Warner Bros. Pictures, Kyle Gallner, left, and Bradley Cooper appear in a scene from "American Sniper."  The film is based on the autobiography by Chris Kyle. (AP Photo/Warner Bros. Pictures)

Me$$age from the box office

The movie "American Sniper" passed $300 million in box-office receipts last weekend, on pace to become the top-grossing R-rated film ever. The enormous appeal of Clint Eastwood's movie about the life and military career of Chris Kyle, a U.S. Navy SEAL marksman, naturally puzzles Hollywood liberals who think they understand America. They'll have something to talk about at the 87th Academy Awards gala Sunday night.

FILE - This Feb, 19, 2012 file photo shows the Volkswagen logo on the hood of a 2012 Beetle at a Volkswagen dealership in the south Denver suburb of Littleton, Colo. Volkswagen on Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014 announced it is recalling 442,000 Jettas and Beetles to fix a problem that can cause rear suspension failure if the cars aren't fixed properly after a crash. The recall covers 2011 through 2013 Jettas and 2012 through 2013 Beetles. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)

The Chattanooga Boo-Hoo

Valentine's Day marked the first anniversary of the defeat of an attempt by the United Auto Workers to organize the Volkswagen plant in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The Detroit-based union spent years and millions of dollars trying to organize workers at the German-owned factory on the Tennessee-Georgia border, and lost decisively in an election supervised by the National Labor Relations Board.

President Obama. (Associated Press)

Obama's amnesty express

The temporary injunction issued Monday in Texas, barring the Obama administration from proceeding with the president's amnesty for millions of illegal aliens, halted the amnesty express. But the order is only an obstacle, and the crucial word here is "temporary." U.S. Judge Andrew S. Hanen's order has been appealed by the U.S. Justice Department, and the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans might very well alter it, tweak it or suspend it. Judge Hanen did not rule on the merits of the lawsuit brought by Texas and supported by 25 other states.

Farmworkers pick paper trays of dried raisins off the ground and heap them onto a trailer in the final step of raisin harvest.  (AP Photo/Gosia Wozniacka, File)

Raisins get their day in court

The humble raisin — a grape left too long in the sun — is about to get its day in court. The U.S. Supreme Court has taken a case fraught with questions about economic freedom, the guarantee of private property and the rights set out in the Fifth Amendment, and at bottom it's about a few raisins and the farmers who harvested them.

Businesses are fleeing California's high taxes and strict regulations. (AP Photo/Lansing State Journal, Rod Sanford)

Fleeing California

More than a century ago, Roy Farmer, 20, went door-to-door in Los Angeles with his bags of home-roasted coffee beans. By the 1930s, Farmer Brothers was selling coffee to restaurants throughout the nation. Today the company employs 1,200 men and women and generates $200 million in annual sales to restaurants, convenience stores, hospitals, hotels and universities.

The  Maryland State House dome standing above buildings in Annapolis.  (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Protecting aging senators

Anything goes, we suppose, in politics as in love and war. Life expectancy in the United States now stands at 78.8 years, and Maryland Democrats, stung by losing the governorship last November, are trying to change the rules of Senate succession to protect their aging senators.

Smoke billows from the coal-fired Merrimack Station in Bow, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole, File)

Mischief with factoids

Facts are facts, as any reputable scientist would tell you, and if someone tries to change them, like changing a pair of soiled pants, they risk embarrassing exposure. The global warming hysteria is premised on "facts" showing the earth is warming, but these "facts" have been repeatedly exposed as "factoids," the playful invented word of novelist Norman Mailer, to describe something that is presented as fact, sounds like it could be a fact, but is actually not a fact. Surely imposing global restrictions on human activity, which would deny prosperity to the poorest among us, must be premised on something better than factoids.

Ivanpah solar energy project (Sandia National Laboratories' website)

No rival for the lightning bug

Everybody likes the sun. The rays feel good and they're free for everyone. Nobody likes the sun more than the promoters of solar electricity. These so-called "green energy companies," however, are anything but free, and have collected, on average, $39 billion a year in federal subsidies in the six years and counting of the Obama administration. They haven't produced enough electricity to match the glow of a lightning bug's bottom.

How conservatives trump the pity party

William Voegeli's "The Pity Party: A Mean-Spirited Diatribe Against Liberal Compassion" is required reading for all political animals.

King Salman gestures of Saudi Arabia. (AP Photo/Saudi Press Agency, File)

Shaming Saudi Arabia

The example set by the early Americans who met in Philadelphia to write a Constitution for free men continues to be a beacon to "the huddled masses yearning to breathe free," in the words of the poet Emma Lazarus. We, the most fortunate of men and women, sometimes forget the debt everyone owes to the men who understood that all men are equal in the eyes of the Creator, and deserve to be treated with dignity and respect by their governments. The yearning for freedom to speak their minds, write what they want and circulate their opinions, burns in the hearts of men and women everywhere.

Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber kisses his fiancee, Cylvia Hayes, after he is sworn in for an unprecedented fourth term as governor in Salem, Ore. Kitzhaber announced his resignation Friday, Feb. 13, 2015, amid allegations Hayes used her relationship with him to enrich herself.  (AP Photo/Don Ryan, File)

More rain in Oregon

Times have been tough for Democratic governors. Republicans in November ousted Democrats in Maryland and Massachusetts, both blue-state strongholds, and now another Democratic governor, this one in Oregon, where the election results can't get a deeper shade of blue, is out. The influence-peddling scandal that took him down further threatens his fiancee and the reputation of a major donor whose billions are beloved by Democrats.

To avoid the economic, social, environmental and human health catastrophes that would follow fossil fuel elimination, we would need affordable, reliable options on a large enough scale to replace them. Existing "renewable" technologies cannot possibly do that. (AP Photo/Andy Wong, File)

Hydrocarbon Appreciation Day

Fossil fuel antagonists have devised numerous schemes, campaigns and justifications to curb or eliminate hydrocarbon energy. Their latest gambit is Global Divestment Day, Feb. 13-14, dedicated to pressuring institutions to eliminate fossil fuel companies from their investment portfolios.