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Illustration: Thanksgiving prayer by Linas Garsys for The Washington Times

Grand’ther Baldwin’s Thanksgiving

When you’ve dined at Grandma Baldwin’s you will know as well as I. When, at length, the feast was ended, Grand’ther Baldwin bent his head, And, amid the solemn silence, with a reverent voice, he said: “Now unto God, the Gracious One, we thanks and homage pay, Who guardeth us, and guideth us, and loveth us always!”

FILE - In this June 16, 2014 file photo, demonstrators chant pro-Islamic State group slogans as they carry the group's flags in front of the provincial government headquarters in Mosul, 225 miles (360 kilometers) northwest of Baghdad. The Islamic State group holds roughly a third of Iraq and Syria, including several strategically important cities like Fallujah and Mosul in Iraq and Raqqa in Syria. (AP Photo, File)

EDITORIAL: ISIS is the enemy

Chuck Hagel will soon leave his post as secretary of defense, but the threat from the barbarians grows. The threat from the Islamic State, or ISIS, looming over Iraq and Syria and the entire Middle East is compounded by the Obama administration’s confusion and cultivated weakness. Nobody with a clear understanding of what the world is about is in charge of the nation’s security.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry addresses the media after the closed-door nuclear talks with Iran, in Vienna, Austria, Monday, Nov. 24, 2014. Facing still significant differences between the U.S. and Iran, negotiators gave up on last-minute efforts to get a nuclear deal by the Monday deadline and extended their talks for another seven months. The move gives both sides breathing space to work out an agreement but may be badly received by domestic sceptics, since it extends more than a decade of diplomatic efforts to curb Iran's nuclear prowess. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

EDITORIAL: Iran stalls again

The lot of a diplomat is not always a happy one. Life in striped pants can be challenging. So much Chablis and brie, so little time. It’s not all polite chatter. In the matter of the crucial talks over the future of Iran’s nuclear program, all the pushing and pulling of policy, all the huffing and puffing of inflamed egos, will probably be for naught. Sooner or later, unless the Israelis rescue the West from fear and indecision, Iran will have its Islamic bomb.

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EDITORIAL: Why militarize the schools?

But peer pressure, bullying and ambition for good grades aren't the sort of minefield California's schools apparently fear most. They're getting ready for the real thing, deploying mine-resistant vehicles, or MRAPs, against the day an invading army lays a booby trap on the playground.

Sen. Orrin Hatch, Utah Republican, addresses a crowd during the Utah Republican Party nominating convention, in Sandy, Utah, on April 26, 2014. (Associated Press) **FILE**

EDITORIAL: The monument man, by executive order

The federal government already owns most of the land in Utah, and Mr. Obama has his eye on a prime parcel of 1.4 million acres near the Canyonlands National Park. With a wave of his autopen, he can banish development, declaring the Greater Canyonlands a "national monument."

Illustration on tax code complexity by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

EDITORIAL: Dealing with a disgraceful tax code

Millions of Americans entrust their financial information to private accountants, lest they fill out the dreaded 1040 tax form on their own. When things go wrong, and they're overcharged, they sometimes lodge a complaint with the Internal Revenue Service.

Member of Parliament and Shadow Secretary of State for International Development, Jim Murphy, speaks from a soapbox in support of the Union on the final day of his 100 Streets in 100 Days Better Together tour, in Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow, Scotland, Saturday Sept. 13, 2014. Scotland will vote in an independence referendum on September 18. (AP Photo/PA, Jane Barlow)  UNITED KINGDOM OUT  NO SALES  NO ARCHIVE

EDITORIAL: A historic vote for Scotland

Scotland the brave, the ancestral home of millions of the sturdiest and most independent of Americans, will vote Thursday whether to secede to become once more an independent nation. The United Kingdom would be united no more.

GETTY IMAGES
From left, Sens. Thomas R. Carper of Delaware, Evan Bayh of Indiana and Blanche Lincoln of Arkansas are among the members of the newly formed Moderate Dems Working Group. The group of 15 will meet to focus on legislative battles, such as the president's $3.6 trillion budget proposal.

EDITORIAL: A 51st-state fantasy

Senate Democrats who are anxious about their re-election prospects in November are puzzled that Sen. Thomas R. Carper of Delaware, a Democrat, is pushing the fantasy of statehood for the District of Columbia so close to the November elections.