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Two years after Obamacare opened for business, Mr. Obama's health care scheme isn't exactly solving the problem every American must deal with. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

Doubling down on disaster

President Obama is for choice and competition in the health-insurance market, as befits a champion of the free market, except when he isn’t. “My guiding principle is, and always has been,” he said in 2009 when he was trying to sell Obamacare, “that consumers do better when there is choice and competition. That’s how the market works. In Alabama, almost 90 percent of the market is controlled by just one company. And without competition, the price of insurance goes up and quality goes down.”

Gov. Terry McAuliffe, the new Democratic governor, no fan of the civility-in-government movement, calls Mr. Black's measure "counterproductive and mean-spirited" and had threatened to veto it if the legislation passed. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Breaking the law is no solution

No one would reward a shoplifter just because he manages to get out of the store with stolen merchandise, but every Democrat in the Virginia state Senate — and one Republican — voted last week to reward those who broke into the country illegally and get a valuable public benefit.

President Obama gives his State of the Union address before a joint session of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015 (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Three cheers for gridlock

Gridlock became a dirty word in Washington after the Republicans regained the majority in the House of Representatives and stood in the path of the invader from Fantasy Island, shouting “Stop!” The president wanted a rubber stamp, and the Democrats agreed, demanding of the Republicans, “Why can’t you be like us?”

Chloe Kim competes during the women's snowboarding superpipe final at the Dew Tour iON Mountain Championships in Breckenridge, Colo.  (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, File)

Snow jobs in the mountains

Once upon a time the inquisitive and the young, the reckless and the incurably naive wore their convictions on the rear bumpers of their Volkswagen Beetles: “Question authority.” Time marches on. Now those purveyors of rebellion have become the authority, and they want no further questions. “Shut up,” they advise.

Ms. Lynch is a tough prosecutor, more lawyer and prosecutor than politician, and thus very different from the man she is to replace. (Associated Press)

Questions for Loretta Lynch

Loretta Lynch, the president’s nominee to replace Eric Holder as the U.S. attorney general, faces question-and-answer time next week, and this will be the first opportunity for the new Republican majority to demonstrate that there’s a new and more just world on Capitol Hill. She will not necessarily face a hostile panel of the Senate Judiciary Committee, nor should she. She is a known quantity as U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of New York, first appointed by President Clinton and reappointed by President Obama.

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FILE - This undated file photo provided by Gilead Sciences shows the hepatitis C medication Sovaldi. Gilead Sciences says it has reached a deal with several generic drugmakers to produce cheaper versions of its popular, expensive hepatitis C drug Sovaldi for use in developing countries. (AP Photo/Courtesy of Gilead Sciences, File)

EDITORIAL: The spreading Obamacare virus

Socialized health care in the United States comes by incrementalism. Obamacare and its exchanges preserve the illusion of a free market for insurance coverage, but we're inching ever closer to the left's dream of "single-payer," a system of one-size-fits-all medical treatment organized by the government.

Rep. Gerry Connolly, D-Va., talks about winning his re-election, at his office in Annandale, Va., on Tuesday, Nov. 9, 2010. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

EDITORIAL: Scholte for Congress

Four years ago, President Obama urged Hispanics to vote to "punish our enemies." The strategy didn't work, and the Democrats lost 63 House seats. Rep. Gerald "Gerry" Connolly of Virginia, a Democrat, nearly became No. 64.

EDITORIAL: Aborting the 'doc fix'

Whether it's the Republicans or Democrats holding their heads high after the election results are tallied late Tuesday night, there will be important work to do when Congress returns from the battlefields at home. At a minimum, Congress must renew the government funding resolution that runs out Dec. 11.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks during a "Women for Maloney" event in Somers, N.Y., Monday, Oct. 27, 2014. Clinton was there to support Rep. Sean Maloney who is running against Nan Hayworth in New York's 18th congressional district. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig) ** FILE **

EDITORIAL: The politics of pander

A secretary of state could, for example, spark a nasty international incident by mixing up the Republic of China and the People's Republic of China, two nations that don't get along. The "reset button" in U.S.-Russian relations aside, Hillary Clinton's gaffes as the nation's chief diplomat didn't encourage many full-scale invasions.

FILE - In this Thursday, Sept. 25, 2014 file photo, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi addresses business leaders as he launches his "Make in India" initiative, prior to his scheduled departure to the U.S. in New Delhi, India. After months of criticism for not moving aggressively enough on promises of an economic overhaul, Modi, who led his Bharatiya Janata Party to a landslide election win in May, announced a string of policies designed to kick-start Asia's third-largest economy. Over the past week, Modi has unveiled an overhaul of India's archaic labor laws, freed diesel prices from state control and signed an executive order promising to open India's coal industry to private companies. Modi,  on promises that he would re-energize India's stumbling economy, faced a flurry of criticism after his July budget failed to provide new direction.  (AP Photo/Saurabh Das, File)

EDITORIAL: Capitalism's new fans

Capitalism, as a wise man who understood human frailty once said, is a bad economic system. Its only virtue is that it is better than all the other systems. Nevertheless, it has fallen from favor in Washington among those who don't understand human frailty.

FILE - In this July 15, 2014, file photo, Camel cigarettes, a Reynolds American brand, are arranged for a photo in Philadelphia. The nation's second-biggest tobacco company informed employees Wednesday, Oct. 22, that beginning next year, the use of traditional cigarettes, cigars or pipes will no longer be permitted at employee desks or offices, conference rooms, hallways and elevators. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

EDITORIAL: Tobacco neo-Prohibitionists at the U.N.

The world, or a good part of it, struggles to cope with Ebola, and the United Nations continues to be obsessed by tobacco. The World Health Organization, meeting in Moscow, came up with a treaty imposing a global tax on cigarettes and delegates of 179 nations signed it.

EDITORIAL: Bongino for Congress

Democrats in Washington work hard to stoke the flames of resentment against "the rich." Rep. John Delaney is the richest Democrat in Congress, and he's locked in a surprisingly tight race in Maryland's 6th District against Dan Bongino, a former Secret Service agent, the Republican challenger.

D.C. Council members Muriel Bowser (left) and David A. Catania, and former council member Carol Schwartz, candidates for mayor of the District, took swipes at each other during a debate Wednesday. The three, each hoping to succeed Mayor Vincent C. Gray, will debate again Thursday, in advance of Saturday's start of early voting. (ASSOCIATED PRESS)

EDITORIAL: For D.C. mayor, none of the above

Sitting out an election is not always an act of apathy or civic disengagement. Sometimes it can be the right choice, when the options are as unappetizing, as they are in the nation's capital this year for voters charged with choosing a successor to Mayor Vincent C. Gray.

Health workers wear protective gears before entering the house of a person suspected to have died of Ebola virus in Port loko Community situated on the outskirts of Freetown, Sierra Leone, Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014. After emerging months ago in eastern Sierra Leone, Ebola is now hitting the western edges of the country where the capital is located with dozens of people falling sick each day, the government said Tuesday. So many people are dying that removing bodies is reportedly a problem. (AP Photo/Michael Duff)

EDITORIAL: A respite from Ebola

The Ebola threat seems to have subsided, and that's cause for cautious relief. The operative word is "seems," but three weeks have passed since an unemployed Liberian man flew into the United States and infected two health care workers with the deadly virus.

Workers set up a giant advertisement for Apple's iPhone 6 which goes on sale in China, Friday, Oct 17 2014 in Beijing. China is one of Apple's largest and growing market where enthusiasts of the company's latest iPhone are willing to pay thousands of dollars to get their hands on the latest version. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

EDITORIAL: Apple and Google restrain the snoops

Obama administration officials seem to think the Constitution gives the government a license to snoop on whomever it pleases, whenever it pleases. The founding document does no such thing, of course, but Congress cannot summon the courage to restrain the executive branch.