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Democratic presidential candidate, Hillary Rodham Clinton. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)

Hillary’s felonious ignorance

Parsing the weasel words of politicians is not a job for most Americans. That’s supposed to be the job of the newspapers and the rest of the media, but few reporters are willing to do that as they watch Hillary Clinton repeating again and again her claim that her email scandal isn’t really a problem.

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FILE - In this Feb. 18, 2015 file photo Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy speaks at the State Department in Washington. The Obama administration says a new federal rule regulating small streams and wetlands will protect the drinking water of more than 117 million Americans. Republicans in Congress say the rule issued this week goes too far and could even subject puddles and ditches to regulation in what GOP lawmakers call a massive overreach of government power.   (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

EPA rules the waves -- and the wet spots

Barnyard critters beware, the water cops are coming. The Environmental Protection Agency, which claims jurisdiction over the air above, wants to rule not just the waves but the wet spots as well, claiming jurisdiction over water that rushes or merely trickles over the farmland of America.

A statue of the Goddess of Democracy is displayed during a pro-democracy protest near the China Liaison Offices in Hong Kong Sunday, May 31, 2015. The protest marks the 26th anniversary of China's bloody crackdown on Tiananmen Square on June 4, ahead of a much larger annual candlelight vigil. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

The lights flicker in Hong Kong

The newspaper is the canary in the coal mine, the first to warn of the boot of the dictatorship when the dictator feels the heat of a free press. The dismissal of four columnists on The South China Morning Post, the leading English-language daily in Hong Kong, is a sign that China intends to be "no more Mr. Nice Guy" in the former British colony.

Recep Tayyip Erdogan (AP Photo)

Turkey's erratic Erdogan government flirts with China and the Islamists

The course of Turkey hangs on the outcome of the elections June 7, but there's more than provincial interests at stake. President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, eager to transform his nation as well as his presidency, is reaching for more power. His erratic public statements and policy feints in all directions have weakened Turkey's bonds with NATO allies in Western Europe, already wary of taking Turkey into the pact as a full-fledged member of the European Union.

President Obama will ask Congress for $2 billion to deal with the crisis that has seen thousands of unaccompanied children, mostly from Central America, illegally surge across the U.S.-Mexico border.  (AP Photo/Eric Gay, Pool)

Disorder on the border

Texas is flooded, and it's not just the water. The state has been inundated with illegal immigrants surging across its border, egged on by President Obama's unprecedented grant of amnesty to millions who have no right to be here. Though powerless to stop the rain, a federal court has reinforced a legal barrier meant to stem the flow of humanity that threatens chaos in Texas and other border states. The tide of lawlessness may be turning.

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan supports an independent panel to redraw the state's congressional districts.  (AP Photo/File)

Policing for profit

Reform of civil-forfeiture laws is an idea whose time has come. This is an issue that unites conservatives and liberals, Republicans and Democrats. FreedomWorks, on the right, and the Center for American Progress, on the left, invited writers, bloggers and think-tank analysts to a daylong conference the other day to talk about abuses of civil-forfeiture, which the Heritage Foundation rightly calls "a legal tool that allows law enforcement officials to seize property that they assert has been involved in certain criminal activity."

FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2013 file photo, then-Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks at the State Department in Washington. On Friday, the State Department posted 296 Benghazi-related emails from Hillary Clinton's private server.  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

Let's see the server

There's a media consensus that there's no "smoking gun" in the emails that Hillary Clinton, the former secretary of State and presidential candidate, has "persuaded" the department she presided over for so long to release to the public.

In this May 24, 2015 photo, police pick up a pair of shoes after a double shooting in Baltimore. Baltimore city police said dozens of people have been shot and at least eight killed in a series of separate weekend shootings. The Baltimore Sun reported that 35 people have been killed so far in May, making it the deadliest month in Baltimore since December 1999. (Colin Campbell/The Baltimore Sun via AP)

Collateral damage in the ghetto

The morgue in Baltimore is getting crowded. The riots that convulsed the city last month have subsided, and the fusillade of rocks and bricks and the burning of cars and shops has been replaced by a more frightening violence -- murder in wholesale lot.

FILE - In this Nov. 12, 2014 file photo, the HealthCare.gov website, where people can buy health insurance, on a laptop screen, is seen in Portland, Ore. If the latest health overhaul case before the Supreme Court gets decided the way most Republicans want, it could have a politically painful unintended consequence for GOP lawmakers.   (AP Photo/Don Ryan, File)

Paying the devil in the details

Obamacare seems about to implode, and the implosion could be a great contribution to those who would reform America's health system in a systematic way. The nation will have to get it right the second time around.

Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus speaks at the Southern Republican Leadership Conference in Oklahoma City, on Thursday, May 21, 2015. (AP Photo/Alonzo Adams)

Setting up the presidential debates

Out of work politicians with time on their hands once occupied themselves by fishing, collecting stamps or learning full-hitch macrame. But that was so 20th century. Now they run for president, some of them more than once, sometimes with no more experience at dealing with problems than talking about them. Is this a great country, or what? But running for president finally threatens to overwhelm the presidential debates.

Visitors touch the names at the wall of Vietnam Veterans Memorial during a Memorial Day candlelight vigil at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, DC., Friday, May 22, 2015.  (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

'Peace is the right memorial'

Memorial Day in America has traditionally been a time when we pay our respects to those who gave their lives, over a century ago, in a tragic civil war. In a broader sense, it has come to stand not only for the sacrifice of those who served in the War Between the States, but for all of those who have given their lives in arms since the birth of our nation.

The Internet at risk

The Obama administration is determined to give away America's last remaining control of the Internet, an organization called the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, or ICANN, by the end of this year. ICANN assigns the Internet addresses that makes the web work, and the Internet structure is not prepared to receive it.

George Stephanopoulos, chief Washington correspondent for ABC News and anchor of the Sunday-morning political- affairs program "This Week With George Stephanopoulos"

The consequences of betraying trust

Many Americans have moved beyond trusting anyone. They don't trust businessmen and they don't trust businesswomen. They think their bankers are out to cheat them, mistakes at the supermarket are always in the merchant's favor, and the men and women they elect to represent them in Congress turn out to be spineless panderers more interested in their perks of office than in protecting the interests of those who send them to Washington. The democratic government passed down by the nation's Founders has, in the eyes of the frustrated many, morphed into a bloated and incompetent bureaucracy.

President Barack Obama waves as he departs Westchester County Airport in Harrison, N.Y., Wednesday, May 20, 2015, following a trip to New York and Connecticut where he delivered the commencement speech at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in New London, CT.  (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

Questions for Mr. Obama

Washington's chattering class is still buzzing over the question posed to Jeb Bush — would he, knowing what he knows now about his brother's shock-and-awe campaign against Saddam Hussein and Iraq, do it again? (Having been burned once by sitting on a red-hot wood stove, would he sit there again?)

Civilians flee their hometown of Ramadi, the capital of Iraq's Anbar province, 115 kilometers (70 miles) west of Baghdad, Monday, May 18, 2015. Islamic State militants searched door-to-door for policemen and pro-government fighters and threw bodies in the Euphrates River in a bloody purge Monday after capturing the strategic city of Ramadi, their biggest victory since overrunning much of northern and western Iraq last year. (AP Photo)

Disaster in Iraq

The Islamic State -- or ISIS, or Daesh, or whatever we're calling it this week -- has won a stunning victory with the collapse of the Iraqi army and the conquest of Ramadi and Anbar. The attempt by the Obama administration to spin it any other way is foolish. The loss is an enormous gain for the forces of radical Islamic terrorism.

The military had 2,837 active-duty chaplains as of December 2014  but recent high-profile cases of military chaplains facing punishment for private counseling sessions that reflected the teachings of their religion could cause devout Americans who are qualified for military service to think twice about joining the U.S. military. (Associated Press)

The lot of the atheist

The lot of an atheist true unbeliever is not a happy one. He is surrounded on all sides by believers, and he knows he's missing something. He must chip away at the beliefs of others to assuage his doubts and fears.

Nepalese army men search for the missing U.S. Marine helicopter in the earthquake affected Dolakha District, Nepal, Thursday, May 14, 2015. The helicopter carrying six Marines and two Nepalese soldiers disappeared Tuesday while delivering aid in the country's northeast, U.S. officials said. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)

'We stand with Nepal'

In an age of celebrity worship, when the public drapes the mantle of heroism on rock stars, film goddesses and the giants of sport who haven't done anything to earn it, it's easily forgotten that true heroes are those who risk all, including their very lives, for the sake of others. American servicemen and women fit that description, stepping fearlessly into the shadow of the valley of death.

George Stephanopoulos during an ABC broadcast. (AP Photo/ABC, Heidi Gutman, File)

The Stephanopoulos example

George Stephanopoulos of ABC News illustrates the reason why so many Americans don't any longer trust what they read and hear from press and tube. In an earlier time he would have known better than to contribute money, and a substantial sum of it, to those he pretends to cover. "Fair and balanced" was more than a clever marketing slogan.

In this aerial photo taken May 13, 2015, emergency personnel work at the scene of a deadly train wreck in Philadelphia. Amtrak faces what probably will be a $200 million payout to crash victims _ the cap established by Congress nearly 20 years ago as part of a compromise to rescue the railroad from financial ruin. It would be the first time that the liability ceiling, considered by many to be too low to cover the costs of the eight lives lost and 200 people injured, designed for Amtrak actually would apply to the railroad.  (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

All aboard for more arguments

Before the wreckage of the fatal crash in Philadelphia was cleared, the politicians in Washington began to fight over the damaged carcass of Amtrak, the troubled national passenger railroad.