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An exterior view of the Sony Pictures Plaza building is seen in Culver City, Calif., Friday, Dec. 19, 2014. President Barack Obama declared Friday that Sony "made a mistake" in shelving the satirical film, "The Interview," about a plot to assassinate North Korea's leader. He pledged the U.S. would respond "in a place and manner and time that we choose" to the hacking attack on Sony that led to the withdrawal. The FBI blamed the hack on the communist government. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

The ill wind through Hollywood

Terrorists can only defeat America if Americans let themselves be terrorized. With an otherwise meaningless movie in play — wit and humor at the level of “The Three Stooges” — the terrorists have won. Well, Hollywood was built on hyperbole like that. It’s important to keep in mind, however, that America was not a combatant in this war, though it took collateral damage.

The Cato Institute finds that inexpensive smartphones, like the Firefox handset that sells for $35, along with satellite technology, offer the tools to map out and stake their claim.   (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

Property rights for all

The key to economic growth isn’t culture, access to the just exploitation of natural resources or even religion. Property rights trump all. The recognition and respect for property rights, and the expansion of property rights to the poor and unprivileged, is crucial to improving the living standard in developing countries.

Michelle Kosilek, sits in Bristol County Superior Court, in New Bedford, Mass. A federal appeals court on Tuesday, Dec. 16, 2014, overturned a 2012 ruling ordering Massachusetts prison officials to provide taxpayer-funded sex-reassignment surgery for the inmate born as Robert Kosilek, who had been convicted of murdering his wife in 1990. (AP)

No free sex changes

In a rare triumph this week for judicial restraint, a federal appeals court in Boston overturned a lower-court ruling, telling the state of Massachusetts that it doesn’t have to pay for reassigning a prisoner’s sex — or “gender,” as the excessively delicate insist. (Nobody ever called Marilyn Monroe a genderpot.)

Gov. Andrew Cuomo sentences New York to further economic stagnation

New York just gave Vladimir Putin and the Middle Eastern energy sheikhs an early Christmas present. Gov. Andrew Cuomo, after considerable dithering, finally did what everyone assumed he would. He banned fracking and gave up the bounty lying beneath his state. He sides with the radical environmentalists of the Democratic Party against the interests of his 19 million constituents, wasting an opportunity to fire up the rusty economic engine of high-tax, slow-growth New York. So much for the Empire State’s boastful claim that “New York is open for business.”

Protesters outside of Cafe Versailles on Calle Ocho in Miami,  decry the exchange of convicted Cuban spies, Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2014,  for USAID subcontractor Alan Gross, who has been held by the Cuban government. (AP Photo/El Nuevo Herald, Roberto Koltun)  MAGS OUT

Making nice with the Castro brothers betrays their victims

Sen. Marco Rubio calls President Obama’s remarkable gift to the Castro brothers, and agreement to “normalize” American relations with Cuba, the work of a “willfully ignorant” man. We hope so. Ignorance can be corrected. Perhaps, to put the most generous face on it, this deal originated in the bowels of White House incompetence that is the mark of this administration. But Mr. Obama may not be ignorant at all, willful or otherwise, but proceeding skillfully to radicalize America’s place in the world to fit the wishes and dreams of the determined and radical left from which the president sprang.

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FILE--This undated file photo shows convicted police killer Mumia Abu-Jamal. Goddard College, a liberal arts college in Plainfield, Vt., with 600 students, said  on its website Tuesday, Sept. 30, 2014, that Mumia Abu-Jamal's recorded remarks will be played Sunday at a commencement, along with a video about him. (AP Photo/Jennifer E. Beach, File)

EDITORIAL: Cut off Mumia's microphone

Commencement speeches can be amusing, inspiring or, in the worst (some would say even the best) case, a bit dull. Goddard College, a small liberal arts school in Plainfield, Vt., wanted a different kind of speaker. The graduating class chose a cop killer.

In this Aug. 27, 2014 photo, a lab technician shows containers of frozen human milk at the Fernandes Figueira Institute in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. A group of American doctors are in Brazil to learn how the country's extensive milk bank system works. With more than 200 such banks nationwide, where breast-feeding women can donate milk that is then pasteurized and used in neo-natal facilities, Brazil has cut down dramatically in infant mortality. Doctors in the U.S. are looking to duplicate Brazil's success. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)

EDITORIAL: Misrepresenting the U.S.'s high infant-mortality rate

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) finds that the United States has one of the highest infant-mortality rates in the developed world. This is shocking on its face, and certain doom-criers want to declare a national emergency and get the federal government to work on reforming the American health care system.

Washington Redskins owner Dan Snyder, right, waves to fans as he walks the sideline before the Washington Redskins play the New England Patriots in NFL preseason football at FedExField, Landover, Md.,  Thursday, August 7, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)Monday, September 9, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

EDITORIAL: The tolerance of bigotry

Most Americans are of one mind about the values important in raising children. Every parent, regardless of political disposition, wants his child to be responsible, well-mannered, independent and persistent.

In a photo provided by the Humane Society of the United States from Wednesday, May 14, 2014, shows two dogs at a suspected puppy mill in Howell, Mich. Officials say more than 90 dogs and puppies were removed Wednesday, May 14, 2014 from the site. Several agencies were involved in the removal of the dogs from the Howell-area property, about 45 miles northwest of Detroit. Investigators found large-breed dogs and puppies, mainly poodle mixes, living in what the Humane Society says were substandard conditions. The Humane Society says their fur was matted and untreated medical conditions were found, including dental and eye problems. (AP Photo/Humane Society of the United States)

EDITORIAL: The inhumane society

Eight million stray dogs and cats find their way into animal shelters every year, and the lucky ones are adopted into a warm home with a loving family. Shelters are operated by small charities usually called "humane societies," whose good deeds are funded by private generosity. The Humane Society of the United States trades on the good of others to finance a radical agenda.

President Paul Kagame of Rwanda, left, meets with United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on the sidelines of the 69th session of the U.N. General Assembly at U.N. headquarters, Sept. 27, 2014. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

EDITORIAL: Africa needs a hand up, not more U.N. handouts

Leaders from 140 world nations will gather in New York City this week for the meetings of the U.N. General Assembly, to sit still to be "inspired" by the theme of "Delivering on and Implementing a Transformative Post-2015 Development Agenda." Translated from bureaucratese, the official language of the U.N., that means, "We want you to raise your taxes and impose more regulations --- for your own good."