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Blowing billions

Spending $17.9 trillion is hard work. Dispensing cash at a rate of $1 million per hour would require 2,040 years to rack up a sum as large as the national debt. It’s not that big-spending bureaucrats are lazy, but that their hard work has created their own special expertise at wasting money.

FILE- In this Sept. 10, 2014, file photo, North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory speaks to members of the media in Raleigh, N.C. In a letter dated Oct. 6 to French officials, McCrory said the plain packaging proposal may detract from more effective ways of curbing cigarette use. The French bill requiring neutral cigarette packs by 2016 is slated for debate in French Parliament next year. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)

Races for the statehouse

With little mystery about the prospects of continued Republican control of the House of Representatives, attention is focused on the Senate, where there is a lot of uncertainty. This focus gives short shrift to the important races for the statehouses, where Democrats are looking for bright spots but where the Republicans may produce several surprises.

This undated handout photo provided by Revolution shows Ron Klain, a former chief of staff to Vice President Joe Biden.   A longtime Democratic operative, Klain was tasked Friday by President Barack Obama with running the government's response to the Ebola crisis. (AP Photo/Revolution)

Ebola crisis needs more than a bureaucrat czar

President Obama’s confused and timid response to the Ebola crisis has done nothing to calm the fear that stalks America, and choosing a well-connected Democratic lawyer, lobbyist and what the White House calls “an implementation expert” isn’t likely to make anyone feel better. Ronald A. Klain has no medical, scientific, public health or administrative experience to become the nation’s Ebola czar.

Maryland Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan speaks during his first gubernatorial debate with Democratic candidate, Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, in Baltimore, Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014. (AP Photo/The Baltimore Sun, Amy Davis, Pool)

EDITORIAL: Hogan for governor

Democrats stand at the edge of panic. The miserable economy, a president who retreats from challenge to lead from behind and the failure of the federal government to deal responsibly with the Ebola crisis all undermine faith in the party of more and bigger government. In a state that runs deep blue, a Republican has a shot at taking the Maryland governor’s mansion.

This undated image released by Bronner's Christmas Wonderland shows a Halloween-themed tree displayed at Bronner's Christmas Wonderland, a large Christmas store in Frankenmuth, Mich. So-called holiday creep, where the traditions one special occasion are embraced by another, now extends to Halloween. (AP Photo/Bronner's Christmas Wonderland)

EDITORIAL: Decking the halls with regulation

The Christmas season brings no joy to a bureaucrat. There’s no heart for good will to appeal to. Banning things is what sets hearts afire in the Obama administration. The president most recently chased away the humble light bulb, the work of Thomas Edison a century ago, and replaced it with a pale substitute laced with deadly mercury. Only green fanatics were pleased.

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Muneer Awad, Executive Director of the Council on American-Islamic Relations - Oklahoma Chapter, left, answers questions during a news conference concerning a recently passed Oklahoma ballot measure prohibiting state courts from considering international law or Islamic law when deciding cases, in Oklahoma City, Thursday, Nov. 4, 2010. At right is Imad Enchassi, Imam - Islamic Society of Greater Oklahoma City. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

EDITORIAL: Where is Muslim outrage?

Khaled Sharrouf and a buddy were arrested in Australia in 2007 for making bombs to use against civilians in Melbourne and Sydney. They pleaded guilty and were sentenced to four years in prison for "terrorist activity."

The New York headquarters of ratings agency Standard & Poor's is pictured in 2011. (Associated Press)

EDITORIAL: It's not inequality, stupid

Decrying income inequality is growing more popular with the shrill voices on the left as their policy nostrums, including the stimulus that didn't stimulate, have left crippled the economy, with more than 40 million Americans looking for jobs.

Secretary of State John Kerry, left, talks with Chad President Idriss Deby Itno at the State Department in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 6, 2014, during the US African Leaders Summit. President Barack Obama and dozens of African leaders opened talks Wednesday on two key issues that threaten to disrupt economic progress on the continent: security and government corruption. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

What Africa doesn't need from us

What Africa needs is industry, power and, most of all, something to eat. Nearly 30 percent of the world's 842 million hungry live on the continent, and John F. Kerry wants to issue each of them a carbon credit.

Alfred Kinsey, seated left, with his main co-authors of "Sexual Behavior in the Human Female" at the Kinsey Institute's headquarters at Indiana University in 1953. (AP Photo)

The not-so-gay census

Judged by the noise the homosexual lobby makes, with its parades and strutting in the popular media, you might think nearly everybody in America wears the lavender with the pride of the Irish in the wearing of the green.