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Another day, another investigation

Gone are the days when the losers went home after an election, to nurse their wounds, catalog their mistakes, and get ready for another round. Now an election is never over, and special prosecutors and their regiments of lawyers, egged on by the media, continue the campaign by “other means.”

German Chancellor Angela Merkel speaks during a media conference at an EU summit in Brussels on Friday, June 23, 2017. European Union leaders met in Brussels on the final day of their two-day summit to focus on ways to stop migrants crossing the Mediterranean and how to uphold free trade while preventing dumping on Europe's markets. (AP Photo/Olivier Matthys)

Angela Merkel’s welcome mat

Only the hard-hearted would slam the door against a refugee. Their stories are heart-breaking and their courage in seeking a better life in a new home is remarkable. Nevertheless, refugees in uncontrolled number are a headache for everyone. Germany, held up as a nation with a big heart, is learning the cost of Angela Merkel’s big heart. More than a million refugees have arrived since 2015.

In this image from video provided by C-SPAN, Wall Street Journal reporter Jay Solomon is interview on the C-SPAN program Washington Journal on Sept. 23, 2014 in Washington. The Wall Street Journal on June 21, 2017, fired Solomon after evidence emerged about his involvement in prospective business deals, including one involving arms sales to foreign governments, with an international businessman who was one of his key sources. Solomon was offered a 10 percent stake in a fledgling company, Denx LLC, by Farhad Azima, an Iranian-born aviation magnate who ferried weapons for the CIA. It was not clear whether Solomon ever received money or formally accepted a stake in the company. Solomon did not immediately comment. (C-SPAN via AP)

Upholding a media standard

Newspaper reporters aren’t expected to be purer than Caesar’s wife (not even the wife of a Julius Caesar passing as Donald Trump), but a reporter who doesn’t measure up to his newspaper’s established ethical standards can expect to pay for it.

Sunshine on the wall

Congressional Democrats love to spend money on solar power and infrastructure projects, and President Trump has given them something to think about — using the sun to power and pay for his border wall.

Democratic candidate for 6th Congressional District Jon Ossoff, left, concedes to Republican Karen Handel while joined by his fiancee Alisha Kramer at his election night party in Atlanta, Tuesday, June 20, 2017. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

The bad day for the Democrats

The morning after an election is always a time for poring over the entrails of the campaign, and Wednesday the Democrats spent the whole day trying to figure out how they could spend $25 million on a special election in Georgia, and still lose.

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A man passes a section of border fencing that separates Tijuana, Mexico, with San Diego. (Associated Press)

Throwing rocks at the wall

Something there is that doesn't love a wall, the poet Robert Frost wrote, but he never had to consider how an uncontrolled border works. Nevertheless, the Democrats, who regard the southern border as an ATM machine that dispenses prospective voters, vow to keep the funding for President Trump's Mexican border wall out of any short-term spending bill.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions (Associated Press)

Those nefarious Russians

The Russians are a nefarious gang. They send their ambassador to public meetings where he is likely to run into senators, other ambassadors, generals, admirals, bishops and who knows who else, and is quick to talk to them. Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi recommend keeping the poor fellow locked up in the ambassadorial residence on 16th Street, lest he ruin the career of someone in official Washington with whom he inadvertently wishes a good day.

President Donald Trump steps off Air Force One at Langley Air Force Base in Hampton, Va., Thursday, March 2, 2017 for his first visit to the Hampton Roads area since taking office in January. The purpose of his visit was to deliver a speech in the hangar bay of the aircraft carrier Ford at Newport News Shipbuilding. (Bill Tiernan/The Virginian-Pilot via AP)

Tax reform could be at hand

President Trump, in his remarkable speech earlier this week urged Democrats and Republicans to come together to "move the nation forward." One place to co-operate — you might think all could agree — is on tax reform.

FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2017 file photo, President Barack Obama speaks during his final presidential news conference in the briefing room of the White House in Washington. The John F. Kennedy Library Foundation announced Thursday, March 2, 2017, that former President Obama will receive the 2017 Centennial John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage Award for his enduring commitment to democratic ideals and elevating the standard of political courage in a new century. The award will be given in a ceremony on May 7 at the library in Boston. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

A Democrat's sad lot

Despite the noise he or she can make, a Democrat's lot is not a happy one. If you're a Democrat you have a choice of joining either the Hysteria Chorus or the Denial Chorale. Either way, you won't accomplish much except a painfully sore throat.

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with House and Senate leadership, Wednesday, March 1, 2017, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump's second chance

The Democrats finally got a cup of strong black coffee Tuesday night, something to help them finally come down from their epic post-election hangover. Donald Trump's remarkable speech to Congress was notable for its tone, the public reaction it engendered and the way it left so may critical listeners speechless.

A painting of former President Teddy Roosevelt is displayed above Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt, left, and first lady Melania Trump, right, as President Donald Trump speaks before signing the Waters of the United States (WOTUS) executive order in the Roosevelt Room in the White House, Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017, in Washington, which directs the Environmental Protection Agency to withdraw the Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rule, which expands the number of waterways that are federally protected under the Clean Water Act. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Rolling up red tape

The chains are coming off. Bound tightly by the regulatory state, U.S. industry has been hobbled for what seems like forever. President Trump has wasted no time demonstrating his desire to unleash the economy and enable it to roar to life again. It's the way to make America great again.

President Donald Trump shakes hands with Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt, center, before signing the Waters of the United States (WOTUS) executive order, Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017, in the Roosevelt Room in the White House in Washington, which directs the Environmental Protection Agency to withdraw the Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rule, which expands the number of waterways that are federally protected under the Clean Water Act. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Thuggery at Town Hall

Rep. Dave Brat represents the 7th Congressional District of Virginia, but the real "brats" in his district are the liberal activists who disrupted his town hall the other day, spoiling it for constituents left and right, Democrats and Republicans, who were to have a rational discussion of issues important to them.

President Donald Trump speaks as he signs the Waters of the United States (WOTUS) executive order, Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017, in the Roosevelt Room in the White House in Washington, which directs the Environmental Protection Agency to withdraw the Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rule, which expands the number of waterways that are federally protected under the Clean Water Act. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Behind is no place for a leader

Killing people and breaking things is what war is all about, and all indications are that Donald Trump understands that. He was elected in large part to execute a war-fighting mission that Barack Obama stubbornly refused to pursue. It's no less than necessary to guard the nation against radical Islamic terrorism.

Oscar statue (Associated Press)

EDITORIAL: A bad night for Oscar

That's quite a hangover Oscar is still nursing, two days later. The motion picture academy tried to give him away to the wrong winners, and the academy posted a tribute to a Hollywood icon no longer with us with a photograph of someone else who is still very much with us. One of the performers was hit on the head by a prop. One thing followed another.

Democratic National Committee Chairman Thomas E. Perez made clear that candidates running under the Democratic banner must support abortion rights. (Associated Press/File)

Democrats lunge left

Keep turning left and you'll always come back to the place where you started, or a dead end. Neither result seems to bother the Democrats. The party of Jefferson chose its leader over the weekend, Tom Perez, who prescribes more of what brought the party low. Striking out toward the dead end, Democrats will need more than a wing and a prayer to survive and prosper.

Morris Dees of the Southern Poverty Law Center (Associated Press)

Selling an epidemic

Some of the shills on the left lament "an epidemic of hate out there, and it's about to drown the republic." The contagion has spread like wildfire, which stretches cliche to a breaking point, and according to the usual jeremiahs on the left it all started with Donald Trump.

Former U.S. President Barack Obama (Associated Press)

Mon Dieu! President Obama of France

A month out of the White House, and Barack Obama is still looking for work. Fortunately, there may be a France in his future. A group of merry pranksters in Paris is circulating a petition to get him on the ballot as a candidate for president in the round of elections beginning in April.

Protesters hold signs during a rally in support of transgender youth, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017, at the Stonewall National Monument in New York. They were demonstrating against President Donald Trump's decision to roll back a federal rule saying public schools had to allow transgender students to use the bathrooms and locker rooms of their chosen gender identity. The rule had already been blocked from enforcement, but transgender advocates view the Trump administration action as a step back for transgender rights. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

Free-for-all at the urinal

A visitor from Mars or Pluto could reasonably conclude that Earth is a weird planet indeed. "It's a heavenly body of great beauty," he might report back to headquarters, "where everyone is trying to change his and her sex but is so squeamish about talking about sex that they must coin euphemisms, such as 'gender identity,' to describe it."

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting on domestic and international human trafficking, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017,in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

The comeback of coal

President Trump's boisterous press conferences sometimes cast a shadow over one of his most important achievements so far: his executive order suspending runaway Environmental Protection Agency rules that all but bankrupted the American coal industry. Three of America's largest coal companies declared Chapter 11 in recent years largely as a result of rules like the Clean Power Plant Act, a gift of Barack Obama.

Protesters of President Donald Trump's immigration policies chant across the street from the U.S. Customs and Border Protection station Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017, in McAllen, Texas. (Joel Martinez/The Monitor via AP)

Immigration Order No. 2

The fight over who controls U.S. immigration policy is about to enter Round Two. President Trump pledges to come out swinging with a reformulated restriction on prospective immigrants. He seems deadly serious about defending the nation's borders, and those who want to throw open the borders to everyone seem just as determined to stop him. The outcome will determine nothing less than who defines America.

FILE - In this Feb. 15, 2017 file photo, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington before the House Financial Services Committee for the Fed's semi-annual Monetary Policy Report to Congress.  Federal Reserve officials earlier this month discussed the need to raise a key interest rate again "fairly soon," especially if the economy remains strong. Minutes of the discussions in minutes released Wednesday, Feb. 22  showed that while Fed officials decided to keep a key rate unchanged at their Jan. 31-Feb. 1 meeting, there was growing concern about what could happen to inflation if the economy out-performed expectations. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The regulator cometh, and maybe goeth

There's a lot to be said about government regulation -- and much of it not good. Some regulation, given that human nature is what it is, is necessary. But sometimes it seems there's little difference between the government telling you how to spend your money and the government just taking it. Regulations are a lot like taxes.

Maple tree sap drips from a tap into a bucket, Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017, in Brookline, N.H. Sen. Maggie Hassan, D-NH, led a discussion with maple syrup producers in New Hampshire about how climate change is impacting their industry. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

Carbonated politics

Every problem in Washington finally finds a solution, and it's usually called a tax. A group of policy mavens, eager to do something for everybody, proposes to tax carbon, the substance found in all forms of fossil fuels. It's the fourth-most abundant element in the universe. The idea is that if there's a levy on the carbon content of oil, coal and natural gas, consumers will use less of it. Presto! No more human-caused global warming. But it still smells like a tax.

Stranded vehicles stand loaded with goods after the Jammu-Srinagar highway remained closed, at Jammu, India, Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017. The Jammu-Srinagar national highway remained closed for vehicular traffic for the second day Tuesday following landslides triggered by rains, officials said. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)

Unhappy motoring ahead

After years of slow but steady decline, traffic fatalities on the nation's highways and byways are increasing again. If the death and injury toll continues to rise in the years ahead, it's likely the fault of government supervision gone awry.

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, right, and U. S. Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., shake hands prior to a meeting in Ankara, Turkey, Monday, Feb. 20, 2017. McCain met Erdogan after attiendng the Munich Security Conference 2017 in Munich, Germany. (Kayhan Ozer/Presidential Press Service, Pool via AP)

The McCain-Trump feud

John McCain and Donald Trump have never been close, and they don't share agreement now on a variety of foreign policy and defense questions. They have engaged in several testy exchanges in the past, but their mutual antipathy now goes beyond testiness. Mr. McCain, a senior senator and former presidential nominee of the Republican Party -- and with the eminence that those credentials accord -- traveled across the Atlantic the other day to deliver what one analyst calls "a calculated, planned attack on Trump's entire system of beliefs." This is without modern precedent, and it was out of bounds.

The resignation of National Security Adviser Michael Flynn has opened up a vicious fight over the integrity of the intelligence community. (Associated Press)

Finding the Flynn leak

Washington is aflame with speculation over who is responsible for the spy-versus-spy mischief that led to cashiering Michael Flynn, the president's national-security adviser. The president appointed Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster as his successor Monday, but the controversy over the Flynn episode will not go away.