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U.S. indeed less safe now

When you look at the statistics of the past 10 years, crime has been trending downward. Even with the increase in crime in the largely Democratic inner cities such as Chicago, Baltimore and Washington, the overall national trend of major crimes in America has been down until this year.

Illegals erode more than borders

The title of Donald Lambro’s recent op-ed “This bizarre election year” (Web, July 14) teased the reader into thinking the piece was a fair and balanced review of the two 2016 presidential candidates. Instead it was a one-sided attack on the basic tenets of Donald Trump’s plan to control our southern border, end sanctuary havens for illegal immigrants and enforce laws to preserve employment opportunities for law-abiding citizens.

Judge, attorney corruption egregious

Cal Thomas’ op-ed is spot-on about the way in which the corruption, disorder and division in our society is a reflection of what’s in the hearts of each of us (“Cause and effect,” Web, July 20). I don’t believe the loss of Christianity is to blame because throughout history wickedness has been carried out by those who describe themselves as Christians. It is undeniable that we have lost the values, the “moral gravity that once kept us grounded, and the boundaries that kept us safe.”

Inured to ISIS?

No one wants to see what is going on in Islamic-State-controlled Aleppo and Raqqa, Syria, but recent reports from CNN show the truth about what is happening in that war-torn part of the world. It is absolutely horrific, but I’m hesitant to share it with any of my friends because people just don’t want to hear about it.

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Clinton not off hook yet

In light of FBI Director James Comey's 'no-indictment' determination of Hillary Clinton, many people have become angry or depressed, chanting "A Clinton won again" ("Why the FBI let Hillary Clinton off," Web, July 11). Ronald Kessler notes that Mr. Comey did not want to take on "an unwinnable case" under Section 793(f) of the U.S. criminal code. However, as a glass-half-full kind of person, I see an opportunity here.

Don't give corruption the wheel

July 4, 1776 is a holy day on the calendar of American history and a turning point in world affairs. July 5, 2016 is now a day that shall live in infamy, because it was the day the FBI decided that all men, but not all women, may be equal before the law.

Saudis no ally

We are far beyond the point at which America should have awoken to the deep and lasting deception and harm that has been the hallmark of Saudi Arabia's "friendly and cooperative" relationship with the United States ("Secret chapter of 9/11 inquiry released after 13-year wait," Web, July 15).

Removing God from U.S. life

At the Dallas memorial service for the slain police officers, President Obama declared, "We are not as divided as we seem" and "I know America," as though he were the modern father of our country. He also made reference to Scripture, including saying that we are "children of God."

Comey wrong to let Clinton off

Ronald Kessler's defense of James Comey's recommendation that Hillary Clinton not be prosecuted is totally without merit and only serves to highlight the degree to which Mr. Comey erred ("Why the FBI let Hillary Clinton off," Web, July 11).

GOP delegates must vote

Just as the Founders of the greatest republic known to man understood that the only way for a free and just society to exist requires government control left in the hands of the people, the very same applies today.

Trump a changed man

Many Republicans and conservatives have one big thing in common these days: They don't trust Donald Trump. In him they see a man who has been a Democrat and has supported liberals, including the Clintons, for years. It certainly is easy to see why people distrust him, particularly when he is so bombastic, insulting and demanding.

Sea-claims ruling biased

In order to grant the Philippines a favorable ruling, the Permanent Court of Arbitration classified all islands in the South China Sea as "reefs" ("U.S., allies watch for challenge from China on court ruling over sea claims," Web, July 12). It even classified Taiping Island as a "reef."

School choice means innovation

Israel Teitelbaum (and many others) miss the boat when they focus on liberty and "freedom to choose" as the key justification for charter schools, vouchers and the Education Freedom Accounts Act ("'A Republic — if you can keep it,'" Web, July 12).

Trump's no dunce

Wesley Pruden's comment that there is "ample evidence that the Donald is an uneducated lout" reminds me of Clark Clifford's remark that President Ronald Reagan was an "amiable dunce" ("The election to terrify us all," Web, July 11).

Vilifying officers endangers lives

Police actions in Ferguson, Mo., New York, Baltimore, Baton Rouge, La., and Minnesota have been in the news, and a few police officers have been seen using excessive force and shooting people. I believe a small number of police officers use excessive force, and these officers should be held accountable for their actions. However, the vast majority of police officers diligently do their duty and treat criminals and suspects fairly.

Ginsburg's constitution contempt

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's disdain for the political process parallels her contempt for the U.S. Constitution ("Donald Trump on Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg: 'Her mind is shot -- resign,'" Web, July 13).

In Ukraine, corruption on rise

James A. Lyons' "A 'culture of impunity'" (Web, 10 July) made me remember the American playwright Arthur Miller, who two days after his wedding reportedly found out that his new wife, Marilyn Monroe, was a drug user. Perhaps because of Monroe's immersion in the Hollywood culture of addiction impunity, Joe DiMaggio divorced her. Now, two years after Ukraine's pro-E.U. Maidan revolution, something similar is happening to the West.