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Banking & Finance

The latest coverage of the banking and financial sectors.

Capital One logo, via ru.wikipedia.org

Want a latte with that loan? Capital One Bank to open cafes in D.C.

By Ken Shepherd - The Washington Times

Capital One will open two cafes in Washington, D.C., where customers can enjoy a coffee and access free wifi in addition to learning about the bank's financial instruments, WTOP Radio reported Sunday. Published August 21, 2017

Recent Stories

President Donald Trump shakes hands with Merck CEO Ken Frazier during a "Made in America," event regarding a pharmaceutical glass packaging initiative in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, Thursday, July 20, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

An economy back on track

The American economy has been in a funk for a decade. Donald Trump was elected largely on his promise to see the economy regain traction and resume speed on the road to prosperity. There are encouraging signs that his strategy of releasing the regulatory brakes is working. Combined with changes in immigration policy, the years in the doldrums may soon be at an end.

Illustration on the SEC by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The innovation destroyers

Which government agency has done the most to destroy innovation? The American Founders tried to create an environment to foster innovation, because they understood new inventions would increase the well-being of the citizens. And that is the reason the Constitution enabled Congress to create patents of limited duration.

It's still the economy, Stupid

Donald Trump has shown a remarkable ability to survive snubs, slights and spirited assaults almost from the day he threw his hat in the ring, more than a year ago, and he seems to relish testing the depths of the loyalty of conservatives. His remarkable twitter campaign against Attorney General Jeff Sessions, a particular favorite of nearly every conservative, might be the greatest test so far.

Righting the Ship of Security Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A plan to save Social Security

It is no secret that what the major media seem to care most about is radically different from what concerns average Americans. While the inside-the-Beltway crowd continues to focus on alleged collusion between President Trump and Russia, real concerns like the future of Social Security are ignored.

China Steel Dumping Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Putting American steelworkers first

As President Trump returns from his first G20 summit in Hamburg, Germany, we are reminded that some countries do not want to see America grow stronger and be a beacon for freedom around the globe. During his historic inauguration speech while speaking about the decline of American industry, Mr. Trump made clear that "this American carnage stops right here and stops right now." It's clear that the carnage that has taken place in U.S. industries such as steel and aluminum needs to come to an end. As Mr. Trump has said repeatedly, we need to "buy American and hire American."

Illustration on patents and protection of American intellectual property by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Making American intellectual property great again

A deteriorating intellectual property regime in the U.S. has been quietly unfolding over the last decade and has contributed to the declining standard of living for middle class Americans, the stagnant economy, and the outsourcing of high-tech manufacturing.

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin speaks during the daily press briefing, Thursday, June 29, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci) ** FILE **

U.S. blacklists China bank, revving up pressure over North Korea

- Associated Press

The United States has blacklisted a small Chinese bank accused of illicit dealings with North Korea, escalating the pressure on Beijing to rein in its wayward ally amid increased signs of frustration among President Donald Trump and his top advisers with China's diplomatic efforts.

Illustration on draining the Washington swamp by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

The high cost of waiting to drain the swamp

"Drain the swamp!" It was the battle cry of Donald Trump's presidential campaign. Many Republican members of Congress echoed that call as well, riding it to victory -- and control of both legislative chambers.

In this Tuesday, May 23, 2017, photo, Hannah Waring, left, a student at Loudoun Valley High School, and Abby McDonough, a student at Liberty University, work in the strawberry stand at Wegmeyer Farms in Hamilton, Va. Waring and McDonough are working at Wegmeyer Farms for the summer. Summer jobs are vanishing as U.S. teens spend more time in school and face competition from older workers. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

A summer bummer for young job-seekers

On July 1, 17 states and localities will make a difficult youth summer job market even worse by raising their starter wages. These raises follow the 42 separate wage hikes that took place on New Year's Day.

The Illinois Shop of Horrors Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Banana Republic of Illinois

The media has hyper-obsessed over the Kansas tax hike this year and has sold this as a repudiation of "supply side economics." But the real story in the states has been the catastrophic effects of "tax and spend" fiscal policy in Illinois.

Illustration on elements of the American dream by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The American Dream, alive and well

Almost any time you see the phrase "the American Dream" these days, it seems to be in a negative context. The speaker is either assuring us that it's dead or that it can be salvaged only by a radical redefinition -- one that often contradicts the basic principles this country was founded on.

Illustration on the death of cash by Greg groesch/The Washington Times

Breaking the monopoly on money

If mankind can figure out how to give everyone instant communication and all the world's knowledge via the smartphone, why are we not smart enough to figure out equally convenient, quick, low-cost and secure ways of paying for goods and services to everyone on the planet? Actually, we are.

Chart to accompany Moore article of June 19, 2017

Much fast growth right around the corner

Every day there are legions of new economists who dismiss the Donald Trump economic agenda and his forecast of 3 percent growth as a wild-eyed fantasy. The consensus is that the economy "can't possibly grow at 3 percent" says The Wall Street Journal. "Slow growth is the new norm, so get used to it," writes Rucir Sharma, Morgan Stanley, chief global strategist at Morgan Stanley in Foreign Affairs magazine this month.

Illustration on stopping the rise of the national debt ceiling by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why Congress must not raise the debt ceiling

Growing up in Eisenhower's America, my parents spent their summers preoccupied with beach vacations and baseball pennant races -- both a welcome relief from the tough tasks of earning a living and raising children. This summer we get to obsess about whether the federal government will run out of money.

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen speaks on stage as part of a conversation put on by the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy at the University of Michigan's Rackham Auditorium in Ann Arbor, Mich., on Monday, April 10, 2017. (Melanie Maxwell /The Ann Arbor News via AP) ** FILE **

Federal Reserve: 3 things to watch for Wednesday

- Associated Press

There isn't much suspense about what the Fed will announce when its latest policy meeting ends Wednesday: That it's raising its key short-term interest rate for the third time in six months.

Illustration on changes to the Department of Education by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trump's plan for more and better jobs

Good jobs are still too scarce, and the country needs President Trump's trade, budget and tax reforms to restore opportunity, accountability and the American dream.

Recent Opinion Columns

Illustration on the wonders of incentivization by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

In praise of the price system

Kinder and gentler governments use market-based price incentives and less coercion. But all too many government officials forget about the superiority of the price system, and resort to the threat of or actual violence to get the people to do what they want. Business people use the price system to attract customers with lower prices and good employees by offering higher wages (the price of work) rather than coercion.

From The Vault

FILE - In this Thursday, Nov. 17, 2016, file photo, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, before the Joint Economic Committee. A full year after the Federal Reserve raised a key interest rate for the first time in nearly a decade, it is widely expected that they are finally ready to raise rates again at their final meeting of 2016. But the real anticipation revolves around how the central bank plans to respond to the political tsunami that voters have delivered with the election of Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

Fed raises key interest rate for first time in year

- Associated Press

The Federal Reserve is raising a key interest rate for the first time in a year, reflecting a resilient U.S. economy and expectations of higher inflation. The move will mean modestly higher rates on some loans.