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Energy and Environment

The latest updates on energy and environment news, analysis and opinion covering energy policy and its impact on resources and climate.

Elkhart, Indiana, was where President Obama announced his economic stimulus package, which helped the area recover its business of making gas-guzzling recreational vehicles. (Associated Press)

Obama's economic boom in Indiana is a bust for his climate change agenda

By Dave Boyer - The Washington Times

Gas-guzzling motor homes that President Obama blames in part for climate change are the same vehicles the White House is cheering for spurring the economic recovery of an Indiana town where Mr. Obama will take a victory lap Wednesday. Published May 31, 2016

Recent Stories

In this May 23, 2016, file photo, arborist Jim Clark inches up a giant sequoia to collect new growth from its canopy in the southern Sierra Nevada near Camp Nelson, Calif. Clark volunteers with Archangel Ancient Tree Archive, a nonprofit group that collects genetic samples from ancient trees and clones them in a lab to be planted in the forest. (AP Photo/Scott Smith)

Group clones California giant trees to combat climate change

- Associated Press

At the foot of a giant sequoia in California's Sierra Nevada, two arborists stepped into harnesses then inched up ropes more than 20 stories into the dizzying canopy of a tree that survived thousands of years, enduring drought, wildfire and disease.

In this Feb. 14, 2013, file photo, the Volkswagen logo is seen on the grill of a Volkswagen on display in Pittsburgh. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)

New York, Massachusetts sue Volkswagen over emissions cheating

- Associated Press

New York state and Massachusetts are suing Volkswagen and its affiliates Audi and Porsche over diesel emissions cheating, alleging that the German automakers defrauded customers by selling diesel vehicles equipped with software allowing them to cheat emissions testing.

Questions and answers about U.S. fuel economy standards

Associated Press

The U.S. government has issued a report on fuel economy and greenhouse gas standards for U.S. cars and trucks that were first established in 2012. The report Monday kicked off a two-year review process leading to a government decision on whether to leave the standards in place through 2025 or change them.

Chesapeake Bay blue crabs (The Washington Times)

Chesapeake Bay blue crabs rebounding

Associated Press

A report from the Chesapeake Bay Stock Assessment Committee shows the blue crab population in the bay has grown, but still hasn't met target levels.

In this Feb. 14, 2013, file photo, the Volkswagen logo is seen on the grill of a Volkswagen on display in Pittsburgh. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)

Volkswagen reaches $14.7B emissions settlement

- Associated Press

Volkswagen diesel owners can choose to either sell their car back to the company or get a repair that could diminish the vehicle's performance under a settlement of claims tied to the German automaker's emissions-cheating scandal.

In this photo provided by Solar Impulse 2, the solar-powered plane pilot Bertrand Piccard takes a selfie prior to landing in Seville in Spain on Thursday June 23, 2016. (Jean Revillard/Solar Impulse 2 via AP)

Solar-powered plane lands in Spain

- Associated Press

An experimental solar-powered airplane landed in Spain Thursday, completing an unprecedented three-day flight across the Atlantic in the latest leg of its globe-circling voyage.

In this April 3, 2015, aerial file photo, lush green golf courses border the edge of the desert in Palm Springs, Calif. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson, File)

Earthquake shakes California desert area

Associated Press

A moderate earthquake hit the Palm Springs area early Friday and was felt across parts of Southern California, but there were no immediate reports of damage.

People run as weather sirens sound as a severe storm passes over downtown Dallas, Saturday, Dec. 26, 2015, in Dallas. The National Weather Service said the Dallas area was under a tornado warning Saturday. (AP Photo/LM Otero)

Tropical Storm Colin heading toward Florida's Gulf coast

- Associated Press

Tropical Storm Colin was gaining speed and strength Monday on its way to strike Florida, threatening rains forecasters said could cause some serious flooding along much of the state's Gulf coast.

This February 2016 photo released on Monday, May 30, 2016, by ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies shows mature stag-horn coral bleached at Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef off the eastern coast of northern Australia. The reef studies center released the results of its survey of the 2,300-kilometer (1,430-mile) reef off Australia's east coast on Monday. The scientists found that about 35 percent of the coral in the northern and central sections of the reef are dead or dying. (David Bellwood/ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies via AP)

Bleaching kills third of coral in Great Barrier Reef's north

- Associated Press

Mass bleaching has killed more than a third of the coral in the northern and central parts of Australia's Great Barrier Reef, though corals to the south have escaped with little damage, scientists said on Monday.

A boy plays in a fountain to beat the summer heat in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, May 19, 2016. A heat wave warning was issued in Seoul as temperatures soared above 32 degrees Celsius (90 degrees Fahrenheit). (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

Stuck on hot: Earth breaks 12th straight monthly heat record

- Associated Press

Earth's heat is stuck on high. Thanks to a combination of global warming and an El Nino, the planet shattered monthly heat records for an unprecedented 12th straight month, as April smashed the old record by half a degree, according to federal scientists.

Sri Lankans wade through a road submerged in flood waters in Colombo, Sri Lanka, Tuesday, May 17, 2016. The Disaster Management Center said that 114 homes have been destroyed and more than 137,000 people have been evacuated to safe locations as heavy rains continue. (AP Photo/Eranga Jayawardena)

Over 200 families feared buried by mudslides in Sri Lanka

- Associated Press

A massive landslide triggered by torrential rains buried homes in three villages in the central hills of Sri Lanka, and more than 200 families were missing Wednesday and feared buried under the mud and debris, the Sri Lankan Red Cross said.

A helicopter flies past a wildfire in Fort McMurray, Alberta on Wednesday, May 4, 2016. Alberta declared a state of emergency Wednesday as crews frantically held back wind-whipped wildfires that have already torched homes and other buildings in Canada's main oil sands city of Fort McMurray, forcing thousands of residents to flee. (Jason Franson /The Canadian Press via AP)

Alberta declares emergency as fires threaten Canada oil town

Associated Press

Alberta declared a state of emergency Wednesday as crews frantically held back wind-whipped wildfires that have already torched 1,600 homes and other buildings in Canada's main oil sands city of Fort McMurray, forcing more than 80,000 residents to flee.

Recent Opinion Columns

Raytheon's re-engineered Patriot radar prototype uses two key technologies - active electronically scanned array, which changes the way the radar searches the sky; and gallium nitride circuitry, which uses energy efficiently to amplify the radar's high-power radio frequencies (PRNewsFoto/Raytheon Company)

Taxpayers on hook for 'clean' energy projects

When taxpayers lost more than a half-billion dollars on the failed solar manufacturer Solyndra, they were understandably upset. But Solyndra isn't the only corporate body in the graveyard of green bankruptcies. And more are surely on the way.

EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy speaks in Washington in this Nov. 19, 2014, file photo. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)

Obama goes after the farmers

Farmers are now the bad guys. President Obama's administration last week claimed dominion over all of America's streams, creeks, rills, ditches, brooks, rivulets, burns, tributaries, criks, wetlands -- perhaps even puddles -- in a sweeping move to assert unilateral federal authority.

Illustration on impending EPA regulatory takeover of U.S. "waterways" by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A vast land grab to ‘protect’ water

In November, comments closed on a proposal by the Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to redefine "waters of the United States," as set forth in the Clean Water Act of 1977. While Sen. Edmund Muskie, Maine Democrat, author of the 1977 law, required 88 pages for his entire statute, this spring's Federal Register notice ran 370 pages, not counting appendixes, one of which hit 300 pages alone. Little wonder the new "wetland" rules have generated controversy and a likely Supreme Court case.

Jumping the Tax Code Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Special interest pleading via the tax code is government at its worst

The latest disgrace out of Capitol Hill in this lame-duck session is the "tax extenders" bill. This has become an annual Washington ritual with Congress waiting until the very last minute to approve dozens of expiring tax credits, deductions and loopholes. It is a microcosm of everything wrong with the way Congress operates.

EPA Imposing Expensive Green Energy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

EPA's goofy green-energy rules

If you think President Obama's unilateral exercise of executive powers granting near-blanket amnesty to illegal immigrants was an abuse of power, get a load of what this administration is doing over at the Environmental Protection Agency.

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