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Law Enforcement & Intelligence

The latest coverage of the law enforcement community and all aspects of the U.S. intelligence.

Baltimore's murder clearance rate currently stands at 53.7 percent, according to Baltimore Deputy Police Commissioner Kevin Davis, even lower than the national average. (Associated Press)

Cops nationwide struggle to solve murders, as case clearance rate drops to 64 percent

By Maggie Ybarra - The Washington Times

The national homicide "clearance rate" — that is, local police identifying and arresting killers — has slipped to 64.1 percent from more than 90 percent just 50 years ago amid shrinking budgets, higher closure standards and more crimes being committed by gangs and drug dealers who may have no local footprint and/or encourage a "no-snitch" mentality. Published April 19, 2015

Recent Stories

FILE - This Jan. 15, 2014, file photo, a Los Angeles Police officer wears an on-body cameras during a demonstration for media in Los Angeles. A small number of Cleveland patrol officers will take to the streets Wednesday, Feb. 4, 2015, equipped with new city-owned body cameras, technology that officials hope will provide more accountability within the troubled department and close the gap of mistrust of police within the community. Cleveland joins a growing roster of big cities that equip officers with body cameras, including Los Angeles, which announced a plan in December to provide them to 7,000 officers. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)

Rand Paul backs police body-camera pilot programs

- The Washington Times

Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky is teaming up with a few Democrats to push a measure that would help state and local law enforcement cover the cost of purchasing or leasing body-worn cameras as part of pilot programs that will test whether the equipment could help increase public trust in law enforcement and bolster public safety.

John McCain slams Dick Durbin for playing race card in Lynch vote

- The Washington Times

Sen. John McCain on Thursday scolded Senate Democratic Whip Richard J. Durbin for accusing Republicans of making Loretta Lynch "sit on the back of the bus" by delaying a confirmation vote on her nomination for attorney general, which could make her the first black female to serve as American's top cop.

In this Nov. 1, 2011, file photo, Jimmy Wales, founder of Wikipedia speaks during the opening session at the London Cyberspace Conference in London. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, file pool)

Wikipedia, others suing NSA over mass-surveillance program

- The Washington Times

A collection of civil-liberties and free-speech advocates, including the popular Wikipedia site, announced Tuesday they are suing the National Security Agency over its broad surveillance of U.S. Internet traffic, in part based on information gleaned from NSA leaker Edward Snowden.

Recent Opinion Columns

Image of Justice Department Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

ORRIN G. HATCH: Why the rush to a new attorney general?

President Obama's nomination of Loretta Lynch to replace Eric Holder Jr. as attorney general is an opportunity to refurbish the tarnished image of both the Senate and the Department of Justice.

Unarmed police are sitting ducks

- The Washington Times

David Grosso, a freshman at-large council member, wants members of the Metropolitan Police Department to serve but not protect. He wants to take their guns away, and he wants us to participate in a love-in of the '60s and '70s variety. Mr. Grosso must be having flashbacks from innocently being in the vicinity of second-hand reefer smoke.