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KEENE: Area’s diversity can keep any sportsman busy

- The Washington Times

The blues and rockfish of the Chesapeake, the ducks and geese that darken the skies on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, the deer and turkey roaming the hills and mountains within two hours of the White House, along with the bass and shad one finds in the Potomac and the trout in the streams and rivers of West Virginia, Virginia and Maryland are enough to keep any sportsman busy for a lifetime.

Will Rupli, 13, aims during a dove shoot. It is common to see three generations of one family take part in a dove shoot. (Tim Rupli)

Dove shooting: A family affair

September is time for football, and dove shooting. And it officially starts hunting season in the Mid-Atlantic and South. It’s a sport that unites farmers and shooters, ecologists, friends and family in local grain fields and at tailgate parties that follow.

Gene Mueller’s Fishing Report

- The Washington Times

Atlantic croakers finally have decided to show up in Southern Maryland waters. The species is a warm-weather favorite for thousands of local saltwater anglers who use two-hook bottom rigs, baited with pieces of (very expensive) bloodworms, peeler crab, or more reasonably priced squid and small, uncooked grocery store shrimp.

Gene Mueller’s Fishing Report

- The Washington Times

Now that the catching of 18-inch striped bass is legal anywhere south of the Hart-Miller dike in the northern Chesapeake Bay, most Maryland boaters are delighted simply because the large trophy stripers that had to measure at least 28 inches have not been the easiest fish to find of late. Incidentally, the 18-inch rockfish also are legal in Virginia’s Bay waters.

Gene Mueller’s Fishing Report

- The Washington Times

If you’re among the hundreds of boaters trying to troll up a 28-inch-or-longer striped bass during Maryland’s current trophy rockfish season, don’t be upset if you come back to port without the fish you’re after.

Gene Mueller’s Fishing Report

- The Washington Times

During the current open season for trophy striped bass in the lower portions of the Potomac River and Maryland’s part of the Chesapeake Bay, conflicting reports are heard from boaters who are out by the hundreds looking for big rockfish.

Gene Mueller’s Fishing Report

- The Washington Times

The rains finally arrived, and even though we prayed for the wet stuff, a lot of anglers feared a lengthy downpour would raise and muddy water levels. It didn’t happen.

Gene Mueller’s Fishing Report

The Washington Times

In some parts of our region fishing could not be better, but biologists are concerned that the shortage of precipitation might affect spawning activities of certain fish, including smallmouth bass in such rivers as Virginia’s Rappahannock and Maryland’s Potomac.

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