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Alex Swoyer

Alex Swoyer

Originally from Texas, Alex Swoyer left the Lone Star State to attend the Missouri School of Journalism where she graduated with a bachelor's degree in journalism with an emphasis in broadcast.

She has experience covering stories in the mid-Missouri, Houston and southwest Florida areas where she worked at local affiliate TV stations and received a First Place Mark of Excellence Award from the Society of Professional Journalists.

After graduating from law school in Florida, she decided to leave the courtroom and return to the newsroom as a legal affairs reporter for The Washington Times. She can be reached by email at aswoyer@washingtontimes.com.

Articles by Alex Swoyer

House Republicans demand Ginsburg's recusal from Trump travel ban case

Dozens of congressional Republicans are demanding that Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg recuse herself from ruling on President Trump's travel ban case before the Supreme Court hears arguments in October, saying she's already shown she can't be an impartial jurist when it comes to Mr. Trump. Published June 28, 2017

Senate Judiciary subcommittee on Crime and Terrorism Chairman Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., questions former acting Attorney General Sally Yates, and former National Intelligence Director James Clapper, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, May 8, 2017, during the subcommittee's on Crime and Terrorism hearing: "Russian Interference in the 2016 United States Election." Committee ranking member Sen.  Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., listens at right. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Sen. Graham demands to know if he was unmasked; intelligence officials demur

Officials from the Justice Department, FBI and National Security Agency refused to tell a GOP senator and former 2016 presidential candidate whether his conversations with a foreign leader abroad had been incidentally collected and unmasked during a hearing Tuesday about the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. Published June 27, 2017

President Donald Trump applauds new Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch during a public swearing-in ceremony for Gorsuch in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, Monday, April 10, 2017. (Associated Press)

Justice Gorsuch immediately asserts himself on right of Supreme Court

Newly minted Supreme Court Justice Neil M. Gorsuch came out of the starting blocks quickly in his first months, firmly planting himself on the court's right along with Justices Clarence Thomas and Samuel A. Alito Jr. as defenders of religious freedom and skeptics of judicial meddling in the other two branches' work. Published June 26, 2017

President Donald Trump applauds new Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch during a public swearing-in ceremony for Gorsuch in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, Monday, April 10, 2017. (Associated Press)

Federalist Society becomes progressives' new bogeyman

President Trump hadn't even had a chance to officially release his new list of judicial nominees this month before a progressive advocacy group issued a statement blasting one of the picks for having ties to The Federalist Society. Published June 18, 2017

Sen. James Lankford, R-Okla., speaks to the new Oklahoma Highway Patrol Officers during their graduation ceremony in Edmond, Okla., in this June 17, 2016, file photo. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File) ** FILE **

Lankford: Comey's memo leak 'not damaging to national security'

A key Republican on the Senate Intelligence Committee said Sunday that former FBI Director James B. Comey's leak of his memos detailing his private meeting with the president was "inappropriate," but "releasing his memos [is] not damaging to national security." Published June 11, 2017

Senate Judiciary Committee member Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., questions Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch during the committee's confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington on March 21, 2017. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Graham says he wants 'to hear from Loretta Lynch'

Sen. Lindsey Graham told CBS' "Face the Nation" on Sunday that he wants to hear from former Attorney General Loretta Lynch following ousted FBI Director James B. Comey's testimony last week that she requested he call the investigation of Hillary Clinton's email a "matter." Published June 11, 2017

Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer of N.Y. reacts to questions from reporters about President Donald Trump reportedly sharing classified information with two Russian diplomats during a meeting in the Oval Office, Tuesday, May 16, 2017, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Schumer invites Trump to turn over tapes or testify before Senate

President Trump faced increasing pressure on Sunday from both sides of the aisle to confirm whether or not he has tapes of his private conversation with ousted FBI Director James B. Comey, and, if so, to turn them over to the special counsel investigating whether or not there was collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia. Published June 11, 2017