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Andrea Noble

Andrea Noble

Andrea Noble is a crime and public safety reporter for The Washington Times. She can be reached at anoble@washingtontimes.com.

Articles by Andrea Noble

FILE - This is a Wednesday, May 27, 2015 file photo of U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch as she announces an indictment against nine FIFA officials and five corporate executives for racketeering, conspiracy and corruption at a news conference in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Federal prosecutors leading investigations of corruption in international football are to hold a joint news conference in FIFA's home city. On Sept. 14 in Zurich, U.S. attorney general Loretta Lynch and her counterpart from Switzerland, Michael Lauber, will give updates on their cases, Lauber's office said Tuesday Sept. 1, 2015.  (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

AG Lynch offers support amid police officers' killings

Attorney General Loretta Lynch on Wednesday offered a message of support to the law enforcement community, condemning the recent brutal killings of police officers in Texas and Illinois. Published September 2, 2015

This photo shows bitcoin tokens in Sandy, Utah. U.S. prosecutors said Jan. 27, 2014, that two men are charged with conspiring to commit money laundering by selling more than $1 million in Bitcoins to users of the black market website Silk Road, which lets users buy illegal drugs anonymously. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Ex-Secret Service agent pleads guilty in Silk Road theft

A former Secret Service agent who was investigating the online drug trafficking website Silk Road has pleaded guilty to charges related to the theft of electronic currency from users of the site. Published September 1, 2015

Black Lives Matter protesters agitate at the front gate of the Minnesota State Fair during a protest Saturday. Some fear the protest movement may be promoting violence against police that contributed to a Houston deputy's slaying by a black man Friday. (Star Tribune via Associated Press)

Police want Obama to cool rhetoric blamed for violence

Law enforcement officials are frustrated by the Obama administration's failure to address the "anti-cop" rhetoric coming from the Black Lives Matter movement, and some fear it's promoting a climate of violence against police officers that may have contributed to Friday's fatal ambush of a Houston sheriff's deputy. Published August 31, 2015

FILE - In this Thursday, June 6, 2013, file photo, a sign stands outside the National Security Administration (NSA) campus in Fort Meade, Md. The National Security Agency tracks the locations of nearly 5 billion cellphones every day overseas, including those belonging to Americans abroad, The Washington Post reported Wednesday, Dec. 4, 2013. Such data means the NSA can track the movements of almost any cellphone around the world, and map the relationships of the cellphone user. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

NSA phone-snooping program approved through November

The National Security Agency's phone-snooping program received federal court approval to continue through November, the last such renewal of the program allowable under legislation approved this year by Congress. Published August 28, 2015

FILE In this June 6, 2013 file photo, a sign stands outside the National Security Agency (NSA) campus in Fort Meade, Md.   The National Security Agency has begun winding down its collection and storage of American phone records this week after the Senate failed to agree on a path forward to change or extend the once-secret program ahead of its expiration at the end of the month.  (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File) **FILE**

Despite setback, lawsuit challenging NSA phone snooping still alive

A federal appeals court dealt a blow last week to a legal challenge of the National Security Agency's phone snooping program, ending a ban on data collection involving the plaintiffs and remanding the lawsuit to a lower court for further proceedings. Published August 28, 2015

FILE In this June 6, 2013 file photo, a sign stands outside the National Security Agency (NSA) campus in Fort Meade, Md.   The National Security Agency has begun winding down its collection and storage of American phone records this week after the Senate failed to agree on a path forward to change or extend the once-secret program ahead of its expiration at the end of the month.  (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File) **FILE**

Appeals court backs NSA phone-snooping, overturns Klayman victory

A federal appeals court backed the National Security Agency's phone-snooping program Friday ruling that Larry Klayman, the plaintiff and frequent court adversary to President Obama, never proved his calls were scooped up in the phone-records dragnet. Published August 28, 2015

In this framegrab from video made by the camera of WDBJ-TV cameraman Adam Ward, Vester Lee Flanagan II stands over Mr. Ward with a gun after fatally shooting him and reporter Alison Parker on Wednesday during a live on-air interview in Moneta, Va. (Twitter via Associated Press)

TV news gunman Vester Lee Flanagan a 'powder keg' of racial discord

Vester Lee Flanagan, a former TV reporter who recorded himself fatally shooting a reporter and videographer during a live broadcast in Virginia on Wednesday morning, was disgruntled over perceived racial discrimination and purportedly said he was pushed to act out because of a mass shooting this summer that targeted black congregants at a church in Charleston, South Carolina. Published August 26, 2015

President Obama speaks in the South Court Auditorium in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex in Washington on Aug. 6, 2015. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Obama's second-chance rhetoric doesn't extend to White House visitors

Although President Obama has embraced the idea of offering second chances to ex-prisoners — like removing the box on employment applications asking if a candidate has committed a felony — his ideals have yet to be implemented at the White House, according to one criminal justice reformer. Published August 26, 2015

Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., answers a question in Union Township, N.J., Monday, July 27, 2015. The corruption indictment against Menendez is only a few months old, but early court filings pull back the curtain on a legal fight that figures to be bitter, personal and contested at every step. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

Justice Department denies claims of wrongdoing made by Menendez lawyers

The Justice Department is defending its corruption investigation of Sen. Robert Menendez against his attorneys' accusations of government misconduct, calling the attacks so "sensational" and "frivolous" that their arguments should be flatly rejected. Published August 24, 2015

D.C. police officers gather at a community outreach tent placed in the Shaw neighborhood on Aug. 21. The tent, meant to foster community interaction, was placed next to a shrine erected for Tamara Gliss, who was fatally shot at a Memorial Day barbecue when someone fired shots into a crowd. (Andrea Noble/The Washington Times)

D.C. homicides spike has residents on edge, officials under fire

The onslaught of fatal shootings in the District of Columbia this summer has pushed the city's homicide tally to 102 this year -- 36 percent higher than last year -- leaving residents angry and on edge as they plead with D.C. officials to get the violence under control. Published August 23, 2015

Police departments across the country are facing a crisis in confidence following high-profile deadly use-of-force cases, starting especially with the fatal shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. (Associated Press)

Names of cops routinely withheld in police shootings amid calls for transparency

For 17 months after an officer responding to a domestic call fatally shot a man standing in the doorway of his home, police in the Northern Virginia suburbs of Washington, only provided family members and the public with a bare-bones account of the shooting, declining to even identify the officer involved. Published August 18, 2015