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Andrea Noble

Andrea Noble

Andrea Noble is a crime and public safety reporter for The Washington Times. She can be reached at anoble@washingtontimes.com.

Articles by Andrea Noble

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser introduced a bill to clarify language in an anti-descrimination law to state that it does not require any specific type of insurance coverage. (Associated Press)

ACLU bristles at Bowser proposal for all-boys high school

With D.C. Public Schools graduating less than half of its black male high school students, Mayor Muriel Bowser’s plan to close the achievement gap by establishing an all-boys high school earned high praise from lawmakers and educators when it was announced last month. Published February 24, 2015

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan greets state lawmakers before delivering his State of the State address Wednesday, Feb. 4, 2015, in Annapolis, Md. Hogan outlined plans for tax relief, charter schools and reforms to the state's legislative redistricting process. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)

Larry Hogan seeks to end property tax on Maryland small businesses

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan on Wednesday outlined a plan to cut taxes on small businesses — the Republican's latest tax-relief proposal that actually may be the most palatable for a Democratic-controlled legislature in a state striving to improve its business climate, analysts say. Published February 18, 2015

A heavy wet snow covers pine trees as public works director Shannon Clem plows snow along 7th Street in Grottoes, Va., Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2014. (AP Photo/The Daily News-Record, Michael Reilly)  ** FILE **

Metropolitan area braces for snow, cold

Snow plows and salt trucks are ready and waiting to treat D.C.-area streets Monday for an approaching winter storm that is expected to bring 4 to 6 inches of snow to the region. Published February 16, 2015

Signs directing to the office of the Firearms Registration Unit at the District's Metropolitan Police Department headquarters in Washington, D.C., are seen here Jan. 2, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times) **FILE**

DOJ wants 60-day stay of judge's ruling on D.C. gun purchases

The Department of Justice has asked for a 60-day stay of a federal judge's ruling that struck down prohibitions on out-of-state handgun purchases — a decision that could make it easier for D.C. residents to acquire firearms. Published February 13, 2015

Smoke fills a Washington Metro system subway car near the L'Enfant Plaza station in Washington, D.C. Monday. (AP Photo/Andrew Litwin)

NTSB: Fans pulled smoke toward passengers trapped in Metro train

Fans used during the Jan. 12 deadly Metro incident to ventilate the L'Enfant Plaza station actually pulled smoke toward a disabled train, where trapped passengers gasped for clean air, according to the National Transportation Safety Board. Published February 11, 2015

Cheh letter asks for ruling on all-boys school, citing sexism concerns

A D.C. Council member has asked the city's Attorney General to review the public school system's plan to open an all-boys school meant to address achievement disparities among black and Hispanic students, citing concerns over possible sex discrimination. Published February 9, 2015

Allowing marijuana legalization in the District leaves the United States vulnerable to charges it is violating international treaties aimed at stemming the drug trade, the nonpartisan research arm of Congress concluded in an analysis that could strengthen the resolve of lawmakers on Capitol Hill to overturn the measure. (Associated Press)

D.C. Council skirts federal threat, holds forum on pot legalization

The D.C. Council on Monday downgraded the scope of a hearing on the legalization of marijuana sales to avoid legal concerns raised by the city's attorney general — a move emblematic of the hurdles congressional oversight has created for the city in its quest to legalize pot. Published February 9, 2015

Washington, D.C. Interim Fire Chief Eugene Jones at Engine 11 in Colombia Heights, Washington, D.C., Friday, August 22, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

D.C. first responders better using cellphones than radios

D.C. Fire and Emergency Medical Services union representatives said Thursday that first responders would be better served using cellphones to communicate in Metro stations due to long-term problems with radio systems within the transit system. Published February 5, 2015