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Andrea Noble

Andrea Noble

Andrea Noble is a crime and public safety reporter for The Washington Times. She can be reached at anoble@washingtontimes.com.

Articles by Andrea Noble

FILE - In this Thursday, Feb. 17, 2011 file photo, hundreds of newly trained al-Shabab fighters perform military exercises in the Lafofe area some 18km south of Mogadishu, in Somalia. A Somali intelligence official says Zakariya Ismail Ahmed Hersi, a leader with the Islamic extremist group al-Shabab who has a $3 million bounty on his head, has surrendered to police in Somalia. (AP Photo/Farah Abdi Warsameh, File)

FBI seeking Virginia cabbie with ties to terrorists

A former Virginia cab driver, suspected of being a recruiter for al-Shabab and traveling to Somalia to aid the militant group, was added to the FBI’s “Most Wanted Terrorists” list Thursday. Published January 29, 2015

Metropolitan Police Chief Cathy L. Lanier said that even before decriminalization took effect, police did not actively pursue many marijuana possession charges. "Officers for the last 20 years have avoided possession of marijuana arrests because they've not been prosecuted for many, many years," Chief Lanier said. (Associated Press)

Up in smoke: Most D.C. marijuana citations go unpaid

D.C. police have written more than 250 tickets for marijuana possession in the roughly six months since the District relaxed its marijuana laws, but the vast majority of citations have simply been ignored, an analysis by The Washington Times has found. Published January 26, 2015

Richard G. Sterne, Jr.

D.C. fire chief demoted in beer case to be reinstated

An arbitrator has ordered the D.C. fire department to reverse former Chief Kenneth B. Ellerbe's demotion of a 33-year veteran employee over his handling of an internal disciplinary matter involving beer found in a fire house. Published January 26, 2015

Jack Requa, Metro's interim general manager, addresses reporters after the transit agency's Jan. 22 safety board meeting in D.C. (Andrea Noble/The Washington Times)

Metro: Radio issues with firefighters slowed communication in fatal train incident

Metro officials said Thursday radio issues that prevented D.C. firefighters from communicating in train tunnels as they evacuated passengers from a smoke-filled train last week have been fixed and officials have laid out a plan of 10 "safety actions" to be taken in the wake of the fatal incident. Published January 22, 2015

Christopher Barry, the son of the late former Washington Mayor Marion Barry, speaks in Washington in this March 19, 2014, file photo. Barry is pledging to continue his campaign for the D.C. Council after he was accused of threatening a bank teller and destroying a security camera. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

Marion Barry's son pleads not guilty in bank dustup

The son of former D.C. Mayor Marion Barry pleaded not guilty to three misdemeanor charges Wednesday that arose from an altercation at a bank in which the 34-year-old is accused of threatening a teller after learning his account was overdrawn. Published January 21, 2015

Metro issued this photo of a man suspected of firing into a packed Metro bus in the District Monday night and a woman who accompanied him on the bus.

Shooting on D.C. Metro bus; two wounded

Police are looking for a man who fired into a packed Metro bus in the District Monday night and a woman who accompanied him on the bus. Published January 20, 2015

Children participate in the annual White House Easter Egg Roll on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Monday, April 9, 2012. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Porta-potty horror at White House

It ended in tears for Monica Ellis, who shattered her foot in a fall outside the portable toilets at the 2012 White House Easter Egg Roll — and now she's suing for $4 million. Published January 19, 2015

D.C. Council Chairman Phil Mendelson said the council should be in the clear to hold public meetings on the proposed legislation which would codify regulations regarding marijuana that were not included in a voter-approved ballot initiative. (Associated Press)

D.C. Council sets up hearings on marijuana regulation

The D.C. Council is pursuing a regulatory scheme for the sale and taxation of marijuana, scheduling hearings on proposed legislation that flies in the face of congressional attempts to prevent the District from loosening its drug laws. Published January 18, 2015

Officer Benjamin Fetting models a wolfcom radio that has a camera built into it as Washington, D.C. MPD Chief Cathy Lanier announces that the police department is testing five different kinds of body-worn cameras during a pilot program, during a press conference at the Wilson Building, Washington, D.C., Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times) ** FILE **

Pro-police rally, 'Sea of Blue' march, set for D.C. on Saturday

A pro-police rally is planned in Washington, D.C., on Saturday to show support for law enforcement at a time when departments nationwide have come under scrutiny for officer-involved shootings and a handful of police killings have left officers feeling increasingly under siege. Published January 16, 2015

The NTSB is investigating the incident of a subway train that spilled smoke near the L'Enfant Metro Station in Washington. One woman was killed and dozens others were sent to the hospital. District of Columbia Mayor Muriel Bowser has promised a full report on the incident with 48 hours. (Associated Press)

Confusion reigned in response to Metro smoke

It took firefighters at least 30 minutes after the first 911 call to reach Metro train commuters stuck in smoke-filled cars, with first responders to the deadly incident sent to three different locations, according to preliminary information released Thursday by D.C. officials. Published January 15, 2015

The NTSB is investigating the incident of a subway train that spilled smoke near the L'Enfant Metro Station in Washington. One woman was killed and dozens others were sent to the hospital. District of Columbia Mayor Muriel Bowser has promised a full report on the incident with 48 hours. (Associated Press)

Muriel Bowser promises full report on D.C. Metro incident

It took firefighters at least 30 minutes after the first 911 call to reach Metro train commuters stuck in smoke-filled cars, with first responders to the deadly incident sent to three different locations, according to preliminary information released Thursday by D.C. officials. Published January 15, 2015

FILE - In this Jan. 12, 2015 file photo, a firefighter attends people on a bus to assess triage needs after people were evacuated from a smoke filled Metro subway tunnel in Washington. Passengers on a smoke-filled subway train in the nation's capital were still asking when help would arrive 27 minutes after the smoke was first reported, District of Columbia officials said Thursday. One woman died and dozens more were sickened when the train filled with smoke Monday afternoon near a busy station in downtown Washington. The cause of the electrical malfunction that led to the smoke remains under investigation.  (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

Rider readies suit in deadly D.C. Metro train incident

A passenger on the Metro train that stopped and filled with smoke at the L’Enfant Plaza station said Thursday he plans to file a lawsuit claiming negligence on the behalf of the transit agency. Published January 15, 2015

The "Death with Dignity Act," introduced by Mary M. Cheh, would establish a process by which a terminally ill patient expected to live no longer than six months could request medication to end his or her life.

 (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)

D.C. council to consider 'Death with Dignity Act'

A D.C. Council member has introduced legislation that would make physician-assisted suicide legal in the nation's capital for individuals with a terminal illness. Published January 14, 2015

Smoke fills a Washington Metro system subway car near the L'Enfant Plaza station in Washington, D.C. Monday. (AP Photo/Andrew Litwin)

Silence on deadly Metro incident riles commuters

Metro commuters are riled up over the lack of information being released about Monday's deadly smoke incident on the subway, and local lawmakers and emergency workers have been told to stay mum. Published January 14, 2015