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Andrea Noble

Andrea Noble

Andrea Noble is a crime and public safety reporter for The Washington Times. She can be reached at anoble@washingtontimes.com.

Articles by Andrea Noble

Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Police Chief Cathy Lanier, left, is on hand as D.C. public officials speak to the media about emergency legislation to amend District laws to conforming to the court's recent Palmer v. District of Columbia ruling on the DistrictÕs gun laws during a press conference at the Wilson Building, Washington, D.C., Wednesday, September 17, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

Federal judge considers holding D.C. in contempt over gun laws

A federal judge is weighing a request to hold the District in contempt of court for enacting new gun laws that are so restrictive as to be out of compliance with his order to allow for concealed carry in the city. Published November 20, 2014

Signs direct to the office of the Firearms Registration Unit at the District's Metropolitan Police Department headquarters, Washington, D.C., Thursday, January 2, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

Federal judge considers contempt charge against D.C. over gun laws

A federal judge is weighing a request to hold the District in contempt of court for enacting new gun laws that are so restrictive as to be out of compliance with his order to allow for firearms to be carried publicly in the city. Published November 20, 2014

Allowing marijuana legalization in the District leaves the United States vulnerable to charges it is violating international treaties aimed at stemming the drug trade, the nonpartisan research arm of Congress concluded in an analysis that could strengthen the resolve of lawmakers on Capitol Hill to overturn the measure. (Associated Press)

D.C. marijuana legalization could put U.S. in violation of anti-drug treaties

Allowing marijuana legalization in the District leaves the United States vulnerable to charges it is violating international treaties aimed at stemming the drug trade, the nonpartisan research arm of Congress concluded in an analysis that could strengthen the resolve of lawmakers on Capitol Hill to overturn the measure. Published November 18, 2014

Mary Cheh, Ward 3 Democrat, authored the bill reforming the District's civil asset forfeiture process. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)

Civil asset forfeiture reform passes D.C. Council

The D.C. Council on Tuesday gave preliminary approval to a bill that would reform the process by which police are able to seize and sell property from people they stop. Published November 18, 2014

D.C. Council Chairman Phil Mendelson. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

D.C. rethinks rules that let police seize, keep suspects' cash, property

D.C. lawmakers are pushing forward with legislation to reform policies allowing police to seize property from people they stop, regardless of whether criminal charges are ever filed — a practice called civil asset forfeiture that is facing increasing scrutiny nationwide. Published November 17, 2014

Work on the first phase of a multiyear effort to bury the District's power lines will begin in the spring, after the D.C. Public Service Commission announced Thursday it had approved the $1 billion plan.. (Andrew S. Geraci/The Washington Times)

$1B project to bury D.C. power lines set to begin

Work on the first phase of a multiyear effort to bury the District's power lines will begin in the spring, after the D.C. Public Service Commission announced Thursday it had approved the $1 billion plan. Published November 13, 2014

Interim D.C. Fire Chief Eugene Jones, before a group of D.C. fire cadets, discusses the purchase of new fire department heavy equipment in a parking lot outside Robert F. Kennedy Stadium in the District. The trucks and ambulances are expected to bolster a fire department fleet that has fallen into disrepair in recent years. (Andrea Noble/The Washington Times)

D.C. interim fire chief hopes to keep job in Bowser administration

Interim D.C. Fire Chief Eugene Jones is making no bones about his desire to keep his job into the next administration. Asked if he would like to continue serving under Muriel Bowser when she takes office next year, Chief Jones unabashedly replied, "Yes." Published November 12, 2014

Bruce Springsteen performs on the National Mall in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014, during the Concert for Valor. The Veterans Day event is hosted by HBO, Starbucks and Chase and is free and open to the public. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The Boss, other big music stars honor vets on Mall

Hundreds of thousands of people gathered Tuesday on the National Mall for a star-studded Veterans Day concert honoring current and former members of the U.S. military. Published November 11, 2014

Musicians perform during sound checks the afternoon before the Concert for Valor on the National Mall, Washington, D.C., Monday, November 10, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

Concert for Valor expected to draw 800,000 to Mall in D.C.

Roads surrounding the National Mall will be closed and Metro's Blue Line shut down Tuesday ahead of the Concert for Valor, a star-studded Veteran's Day event expected to draw up to 800,000 spectators to see performances by musicians including Bruce Springsteen, Carrie Underwood, Metallica and Rihanna. Published November 10, 2014

Prince George's County Executive Rushern L. Baker III has said that "National Harbor is the perfect location for this high-end $1 billion entertainment complex," in speaking of a casino recommended for the site. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)

P.G. voters reject term-limit extension

Prince George's County voters re-elected County Executive Rushern L. Baker III for a second term on Tuesday but decided he won't get a third. Published November 5, 2014

Washington Democratic Mayoral candidate Muriel Bowser speaks to supporters at the Howard Theatre in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2014. Bowser is favored to continue her party's unbeaten streak for the city's top office in Tuesday's election. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Muriel Bowser is elected as D.C. mayor

Democrat Muriel Bowser fended off a challenge from two independents on Tuesday to win election as the seventh mayor in the District’s history. Published November 4, 2014

Jason Wright votes at a polling station at Eastern Market on election day, Washington, D.C., Tuesday, November 4, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

Marijuana legalization measure passes easily in D.C.

Marijuana legalization appeared on its way to passing easily at the polls in the District on Tuesday, putting the city at the vanguard of a nationwide movement that also saw Oregon and Alaska consider pro-pot initiatives on Election Day. Published November 4, 2014

Seen here at a D.C. mayoral candidates debate in September, (from left) D.C. Council members Muriel Bowser, Ward 4 Democrat; and David A. Catania, at-large independent; and Carol Schwartz, a former council member running as an independent, now await the voters' verdict on Tuesday. (Associated Press)

D.C. officials ready for record-high voter turnout

D.C. officials are preparing for the highest general-election turnout for a mayor's race since 1998, with a ballot bolstered by the city's first contest for attorney general and an initiative to legalize marijuana. Published November 3, 2014