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Armstrong Williams

Armstrong Williams

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Articles by Armstrong Williams

Radio host and columnist Armstrong Williams. (Image courtesy of New Chapter Publisher)

Finally, leadership has emerged

I have visited the Holy Land nearly a dozen times, and the speech by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to a joint session of Congress left me with a range of intense emotions. Published March 8, 2015

Radio host and columnist Armstrong Williams. (Image courtesy of New Chapter Publisher)

When it comes to Iran and Israel, Obama is way off target

The unelected mullahs in Iran must be having a hearty laugh, enjoying the spectacle last week of President Obama and his administration falling over itself to drive a wedge between America and our vital Middle East ally Israel. Published March 1, 2015

Serena Williams (right) has returned to Indian Wells, California, where in 2001 she was taunted when she won a semifinal match against sister Venus when and injury forced Venus to withdraw. (Associated Press)

The indomitable Williams sisters

Being an avid tennis fan, I watched with horror and great pain the 2001 tennis matches at Indian Wells, California, where the Williams sisters and their father were treated as unwelcome aliens. Trying to grasp the fact that an adult audience could heckle, boo, and downright cheer Serena's double faults and errors in the championship was a time in sporting history I was hoping to forget happened. Published February 22, 2015

Radio host and columnist Armstrong Williams. (Image courtesy of New Chapter Publisher)

The bullet-pointed pen

Satire such as the pointed scoffing of French cartoon magazine Charlie Hebdo has always been associated with lethality. In fact the very purpose of satire is to slay sacred cows — i.e. authoritarian ideologies that often bring life and liberty into grave peril. We ridiculed communism, we ridiculed fascism, and we continue to ridicule religious fanaticism in all of its forms. And that is justly so, because in a free society one is not bound by the strictures of others' gods. Published February 15, 2015

President Barack Obama at the 2014 National Action Network conference in New York with the group's founder, Rev. Al Sharpton, right. (AP Photo/The Daily News, Julia Xanthos, Pool)

Al Sharpton: The Teflon don of civil rights

The Rev. Al Sharpton seems to have learned this lesson long ago: When you’re a controversial civil rights leader who’s made a career out of harassing the cops and embarrassing the government, never keep any assets in your own name. Published February 11, 2015

Radio host and columnist Armstrong Williams. (Image courtesy of New Chapter Publisher)

The Teflon Don of civil rights

The Rev. Al Sharpton seems to have learned this lesson long ago: When you're a controversial civil rights leader who's made a career out of harassing the cops and embarrassing the government, never keep any assets in your own name. But that has never prevented authorities from vigorously inspecting the good reverend's personal and organizational finances over the years, often coming up with troves of improprieties ranging from misappropriation to delinquency and possible fraud. Published February 8, 2015

Radio host and columnist Armstrong Williams. (Image courtesy of New Chapter Publisher)

Will the teachers unions ever learn?

In November the frustrations of Maryland's voters with their state's failed Democrat leadership finally boiled over and provided Larry Hogan an upset victory over the Democrats' chosen candidate, Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown. Published February 1, 2015

Radio host and columnist Armstrong Williams. (Image courtesy of New Chapter Publisher)

Obama's state of delusion

Most of the discussion after President Obama's recent State of the Union address centered on various programs and goals that have no chance of actually being passed by the Republican-controlled House and Senate. But the most cynical, and probably the most dangerous, collision between reality and rhetoric was when the president spoke about Iran's illicit nuclear weapons program. Published January 25, 2015

To the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., the economic challenges of Black America were equally as important as the social ones. (AP)

Black America's economic decline betrays King's legacy

On this anniversary of the birth of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., his legacy is in sure hands. His youngest daughter, pastor Bernice King, has taken over leadership of The King Center in Atlanta and is already doing great things. Notably, she has spent time working with youths in Ferguson to channel their rage and frustration over the Michael Brown shooting into positive action, just as her father helped channel black rage over social marginalization into a movement that fundamentally transformed America. Published January 18, 2015

Radio host and columnist Armstrong Williams. (Image courtesy of New Chapter Publisher)

Elizabeth Warren and tea party are spot on

The ungainly term "CRomnibus bill" combines two phrases — "Continuing Resolution" and "omnibus" — which makes it unfortunately typical of how business is done in Washington these days. Published January 11, 2015

Radio host and columnist Armstrong Williams. (Image courtesy of New Chapter Publisher)

The modern day miracle of Israel

Close your eyes and imagine for one moment how radically different the entire world would be if Israel were at peace with its neighbors in the Middle East. In fact, consider the multitude of benefits to all of humanity and the thought becomes as exciting as it does overwhelming. Published January 4, 2015

Radio host and columnist Armstrong Williams. (Image courtesy of New Chapter Publisher)

Traveling with Ben Carson to the Holy Land

I don't usually get so personal in these columns, but today I want you to know that I feel particularly blessed. I am in the Holy Land with my friends, Dr. Ben and Candy Carson. Published December 14, 2014

Radio host and columnist Armstrong Williams. (Image courtesy of New Chapter Publisher)

Thy medicine is thy food

In today's society, everyone seems to know that a healthy diet is key to maintaining good health, whether we choose to do it or not. But a connection that seems more difficult for people to make is that food is actually medicine. That is, your food is your medicine if it enhances your health; but it can actually be a poison if we consume things that destroy the healthy functioning of the mind and body. Published December 7, 2014

Radio host and columnist Armstrong Williams. (Image courtesy of New Chapter Publisher)

When the poor cried, Barry wept

By the time Marion Barry died Nov. 23, he had already been buried several times by the mainstream media. But each time a chorus of praise seemed to breathe life into a career that many thought had been irreversibly damaged. For the most part that praise came from the poor and the forgotten. Published November 30, 2014

**FILE** Bishop Eddie Long, pastor of New Birth Missionary Baptist Church near Atlanta, has been accused by four men of luring them into sexual relationships. (Associated Press)

Crisis of materialism in church has left it morally adrift

At least some of the faithful of New Birth Missionary Baptist Church in Atlanta had to feign a sense of surprise when sexual abuse accusations against Bishop Eddie Long first surfaced in 2011. But even those parishioners were shocked when details of the church's secret settlement with over a dozen young men allegedly victimized by Mr. Long leaked, resulting in a reported payout of over $25 million. Published November 23, 2014

Radio host and columnist Armstrong Williams. (Image courtesy of New Chapter Publisher)

A new strain of racism from the newest Americans

Racism in America has often been reduced to white-against-black discrimination, and understandably so. After all, it was white colonists who forcibly removed Africans from their homeland and brought them to America to serve as slaves on plantations. Published November 16, 2014

John Boone of Lexington, Ky., carries sign urging people to vote on Election Day, as people gather for a political rally for Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., in cold weather on the Scott County Courthouse Square in Georgetown Ky., Saturday, Nov. 1, 2014. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The midterm elections: A referendum on the two-party system?

For many voters, the midterms are not as much about the individual candidates being elected to the House and Senate as they are a referendum over how well the president's party has performed in delivering on its promises. This time is not different, except that even the opposition Republican voters seem to be more apathetic than usual, skeptical that something actually will come of their vote. Published November 2, 2014