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Ben Wolfgang

Ben Wolfgang

Ben Wolfgang covers the White House for The Washington Times.

Before joining the Times in March 2011, Ben spent four years as a political reporter at the Republican-Herald in Pottsville, Pa.

He can be reached at bwolfgang@washingtontimes.com.

Articles by Ben Wolfgang

Garfield High School social studies teacher Jesse Hagopian (with his hand raised) and other Seattle teachers are refusing to administer to their students a standardized test they say is flawed. (Seattle Times via Associated Press)

More teachers won't administer standardized tests

The standardized-testing boycott that began with teachers in Chicago last year and reached new heights recently in Seattle may be exploding into a full-blown national movement. Published February 4, 2013

** FILE ** Former D.C. Schools Chancellor Michelle Rhee (The Washington Times)

Rhee wary of stressing on testing

As organized opposition to standardized testing grows, one of the nation's most outspoken and controversial education activists said Sunday that such assessments have a place in public schools but cautioned against an "overemphasis" on them. Published February 3, 2013

Kerry

Greens bank on Kerry to quash Keystone pipeline

As the incoming secretary of state, John F. Kerry, a longtime vocal crusader against climate change in the Senate, is in a position to deliver one of the movement’s biggest victories in decades: drive a stake through the heart of the massive Canada-to-Texas Keystone XL pipeline project. Published January 30, 2013

Obama, Clinton laud one another in interview

As she exits the political world, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton sat down for an interview with President Obama, the man who bested her in the 2008 Democratic primary election en route to the White House. Published January 27, 2013

Sen. Richard J. Durbin (Associated Press)

Durbin: Benghazi hearings one of Clinton's 'finer moments'

A top Senate Democrat believes Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton's duel appearances last week on Capitol Hill, in which she clashed with Republicans over the Obama administration's handling of the Sept. 11 Benghazi terrorist attacks, will go down in history as one of the secretary of state's "finer moments." Published January 27, 2013

Education Secretary Arne Duncan (Associated Press)

White House requires school athletics for disabled

In a sweeping move that will affect all American schools, the Obama administration has told districts they must offer students with disabilities the same sports opportunities as other children. Published January 25, 2013

Piping is removed from a drill used in the "fracking" process to recover natural gas from the massive Marcellus Shale in Washington, Pa. The technology is changing Pennsylvania's economy. (Andrew S. Geraci/The Washington Times)

Fracking’s rise in U.S. inspires the world

The U.S. energy industry clearly still leads the way on fracking, which has upended global energy markets, but the rest of the world is beginning to catch up as nations seek to replicate American success in oil and natural gas development. Published January 24, 2013

**FILE** An irrigation pivot remains along a highway several miles near the proposed new route for the Keystone XL pipeline in Neligh, Neb. (Associated Press)

Obama faces new pressure on Keystone pipeline

President Obama's Inauguration Day vow to fight climate change is facing an unexpectedly early test as a decision on the Keystone XL pipeline now rests solely with his administration. Published January 22, 2013

The departure of Interior Secretary Kenneth L. Salazar and other Cabinet members gives oil and gas leaders optimism that President Obama's energy and environmental policies will be friendlier to the industry during his second term. (Associated Press)

Interior's Salazar helps empty Obama's Cabinet

Interior Secretary Kenneth L. Salazar's resignation doesn't just leave another open spot in President Obama's Cabinet. The departure of the former senator from Colorado could have far-reaching effects on the administration's energy and environmental policies in a second term — particularly oil and gas drilling on federal lands. Published January 16, 2013

Frack attacks and filmmakers who fight back

The intense debate over fracking continues to play out on movie screens and television sets nationwide — and this time the industry's defenders are fighting back. Published January 15, 2013

** FILE ** A freshman Republican state lawmaker from North Dakota plans to introduce a bill that would limit use of drones for law enforcement after the highly publicized case of a Lakota farmer who was arrested after a 16-hour standoff with police on Jan. 6, 2013. (U.S. Customs and Border Protection via Associated Press)

Laws urged to curb snooping by drones

Big Brother and Big Business may soon be able to easily spy on American citizens using surveillance drones, security and civil liberties specialists warned Tuesday. Published January 15, 2013

** FILE ** Vice President Joseph R. Biden salutes after arriving to speak before the 2012 National Educational Association's annual meeting on Tuesday, July 3, 2012, in Washington. (Associated Press)

Teachers don't want to carry guns in the classroom, poll says

As Vice President Joseph Biden's gun violence task force readies its recommendations, a new poll Tuesday shows the nation's teachers aren't interested in carrying guns into the classroom to protect themselves and their students. Published January 15, 2013

** FILE ** In this Thursday, Jan. 3, 2013, file photo, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks during a meeting in the Red Room at the Capitol in Albany, N.Y. (AP Photo/Mike Groll, File)

Gov. Cuomo on the spot as N.Y. considers fracking

With nearby states cashing in but environmentalists and Hollywood stars urging him to back off, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is running out of time to decide whether his state will join the natural-gas fracking boom. Published January 14, 2013

** FILE ** This Dec. 5, 2012, photo shows an oil pump jack in a field adjacent to a sub-division near Fredrick, Colo. Citizen fears about hydraulic fracturing, a drilling procedure used to pry oil and gas from rock deep underground, have made "fracking" the hottest political question in Colorado.

Fracking viewed as good; water worries remain

A majority of Americans support fracking, but even larger majorities remain concerned about the drilling process' potential impacts on drinking water quality and support more research into the practice, new polling data show. Published January 10, 2013