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Ben Wolfgang

Ben Wolfgang

Ben Wolfgang covers the White House for The Washington Times.

Before joining the Times in March 2011, Ben spent four years as a political reporter at the Republican-Herald in Pottsville, Pa.

He can be reached at bwolfgang@washingtontimes.com.

Articles by Ben Wolfgang

Outgoing Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels and his now-ousted superintendent of schools, Tony Bennett, spearheaded controversial changes in the state over the past two years. But the future of their reform work is now very much in doubt. (Associated Press)

Indiana governor warns of foes to education reform

At the forefront of education reform in the U.S., Indiana faces an uncertain future after its trail-blazing schools chief was ousted three weeks ago and replaced by a teachers union official. Published November 28, 2012

** FILE ** Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush addresses the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla., on Thursday, Aug. 30, 2012. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Jeb Bush hammers teachers unions at education summit

In the fight to reform American schools, former Florida Gov. and outspoken education advocate Jeb Bush on Tuesday took direct aim at labor groups and joined a growing chorus who believe real change must start by loosening the grip of teachers unions. Published November 27, 2012

Fracking industry keeps eye on Obama

The drilling process that has brought U.S. energy independence within reach faces renewed scrutiny from the Obama administration and an uncertain future in many states. Published November 22, 2012

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal (Associated Press)

New GOP leaders begin intensive rebranding effort

The Republican party's young leaders on Sunday continued to distance themselves from defeated presidential candidate Mitt Romney and ramped up the effort to paint the GOP in a new light. Published November 18, 2012

Pressure intensifies for GOP to raise taxes on rich

As President Obama and Capitol Hill leaders continue negotiations to avoid the looming "fiscal cliff," top Democrats on Sunday ramped up pressure on their Republican counterparts to accept tax increases on the wealthy as part of a broader agreement. Published November 18, 2012

Workers move a section of well casing into place at a Chesapeake Energy natural gas well site near Burlington, Pa. Fracking uses water mixed with sand and chemicals to break underground rock and release large amounts of gas. (Associated Press)

U.S. poised 
to overtake 
Saudi oil 
production

By about 2020, the United States will overtake Saudi Arabia as the world's largest oil producer and put North America as a whole on track to become a net exporter of oil as soon as 2030, according to a report from the International Energy Agency. Published November 12, 2012

Jack Gerard

Keystone pipeline pushed to forefront

With a second term now in hand, President Obama no longer can delay a decision on the Keystone XL pipeline and must either side with environmentalists within his party or greenlight a major step toward North American energy independence. Published November 7, 2012

People cast their votes, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, at a 1st Ward polling location in South Philadelphia. (AP Photo/ Joseph Kaczmarek)

Some Pennsylvanians snubbed by not-in-effect I.D. law

Pennsylvania's controversial photo identification law isn't yet in effect, but voters told state officials on Election Day that they were turned away from the polls because they didn't comply with it. Published November 6, 2012

** FILE ** Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney shakes hands with a supporter while collecting donations at a storm relief event, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, at James S. Trent Arena in Kettering, Ohio. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)

Auto workers hit Romney on China jobs remark

Mitt Romney is making a late-campaign play to win over Rust Belt voters by trying to dent President Obama's credentials on his federal auto bailout — but the claims he is making about Chrysler creating jobs in China are drawing return fire from Democrats and the auto workers union. Published October 30, 2012

** FILE ** Former Sen. Alan K. Simpson (left) and former White House Chief of Staff Erskine Bowles, co-chairmen of the National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform, take part in a news conference on deficit reduction on Monday, Sept. 12, 2011, at the National Press Club in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Kerrey making a race of it in Nebraska

Once thought to be a lock, Republican Deb Fischer is losing her edge in the race to represent Nebraska in the U.S. Senate. Published October 30, 2012

Rust Belt finding no shining knight in White House joust

Scott Dressel has risked his life savings to help rescue this struggling old steel town that is still plagued by double-digit unemployment and banking on a natural gas boom that has yet to materialize. Published October 29, 2012

** FILE ** President Obama speaks to supporters during an Oct. 24, 2012, campaign event at the Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds in Davenport, Iowa. The president began a two-day campaign blitz through eight states with stops in key battleground states Iowa, Colorado, Nevada, Ohio and Virginia. (Associated Press)

Obama auto-bailout strategy running on fumes in Ohio

The Obama campaign is counting on the auto-industry bailout to carry the president to a victory in Ohio, but it ultimately may hold little sway with voters across the state who are still out of work and struggling to stay solvent. Published October 25, 2012

Democratic incumbent Sen. Sherrod Brown of Ohio talks with supporters after a U.S. Senate debate with his opponent, Ohio Treasurer Josh Mandel, at WCET-TV Studios in Cincinnati on Thursday. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

Rivals let barbs fly during Ohio Senate debate

With the race tightening less than two weeks before Election Day, the candidates for U.S. Senate in the swing state of Ohio squared off Thursday night in their final debate. Published October 25, 2012

Linda Lee (right), the owner of the Lions Den Coffee Bar in Fisherville, Pa., has arranged straw men of President Obama and Gov. Mitt Romney, the Republican presidential nominee, having coffee together on the porch outside the front entrance on Monday as Nancy Jacobson looks on. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

Obama's 'war on coal' puts Pennsylvania in play

If Republican Mitt Romney scores an upset and snatches Pennsylvania's 20 electoral votes away from President Obama, it will largely be because of voters like Norma Fae Morris. Published October 23, 2012