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Ben Wolfgang

Ben Wolfgang

Ben Wolfgang covers the White House for The Washington Times.

Before joining the Times in March 2011, Ben spent four years as a political reporter at the Republican-Herald in Pottsville, Pa.

He can be reached at bwolfgang@washingtontimes.com.

Articles by Ben Wolfgang

For-profit colleges defend their stature

These aren't your parents' colleges. There are typically no sprawling campuses, no fraternities or sororities, no students reading books under trees and no sports teams. Published May 4, 2011

** FILE ** Thomas J. Donohue, president of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

Chamber pushes GOP-backed reforms for nation's schools

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce on Wednesday called on Congress to speed up its efforts to reform federal education policy and released a broad outline of priorities it says are crucial to student success across the country. Published May 4, 2011

ASSOCIATED PRESS
Former Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings, here in 2008, says a loss of bipartisan cooperation is hampering current education reform efforts.

Spellings: Politics, lack of knowledge hurt school reform

Ten years ago, former President George W. Bush's signature education initiative, the No Child Left Behind Act, garnered strong bipartisan support and passed the Senate on an 87-10 vote. As Congress now starts work on a policy overhaul, that "planetary alignment" between the parties is nowhere to be found. Published May 2, 2011

Associated Press
Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels chats with student Cree DeDeaux, 14, during a tour of the Charles A. Tindley Accelerated School in Indianapolis on April 15. Indiana on Wednesday passed the largest school-voucher bill in the nation's history. Mr. Daniels is expected to sign the measure into law.

States leaving feds behind on school reforms

A growing number of states are not waiting for the federal government's lead in overhauling education. This year alone, 36 states have either passed or are considering comprehensive legislation on school vouchers, tax credits and other reform measures. Published April 28, 2011

Report: States' funding for pre-K taking hit

Preschool programs have become the victims of budget shortfalls across the nation, and the Obama administration's education point man said Monday he fears it's only going to get worse for the 1.3 million youngsters who benefit from them. Published April 26, 2011

'Moribund' Senate frustrates members of both parties

A few days after 10 of his colleagues wrapped up a trip to the Asian gambling hub Macau, Sen. Mark Kirk warned that the Senate has become "moribund" and is not doing enough to address the nation's many challenges. Published April 24, 2011

CEOs warn of subpar school standards

A group of top business leaders warned in a new report Thursday that U.S. schools have set a standard for their students that's too low and that subpar expectations put the country in danger of falling even further behind other nations in reading and math proficiency. Published April 21, 2011

Report: For-profit colleges 'defraud' students

For-profit colleges, already the target of Senate Democrats, took another beating in a report released Wednesday by an education trade publication that says such institutions "defraud" young people. Published April 20, 2011

Budget fight clouds science, tech research plans

With Democrats and Republicans still far apart on how to deal with the nation's debt and fiscal woes, a cloud of uncertainty has settled over the nation's scientific and technology research sectors over the size of their own budgets in the years to come. Published April 19, 2011

Walker defends budget decisions

Giving as well as he got, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker on Thursday traveled to Capitol Hill to defend his efforts to balance his state's budget by renegotiating public-worker contracts and eliminating most collective bargaining rights for many state employees. Published April 14, 2011

Students earning more credits; grades stagnate

The nation's high school students are earning more college credits on their path to graduation, but steady improvements in grade-point average have slowed in recent years, according to a major new survey from the National Center for Education Statistics. Published April 13, 2011

Education cuts coming, but fewer than GOP wanted

The final spending deal struck by the White House and congressional leaders spares the Education Department the deeper cuts sought by House Republicans, according to the agreement reached Friday. = Published April 12, 2011

Libyan leader Col. Moammar Gadhafi greets supporters in Tripoli on Sunday as envoys from the African Union, including South African President Jacob Zuma, arrived for two days of talks with Col. Gadhafi and rebel leaders. The African Union repeated its call for a cease-fire. (Associated Press)

Tony Blair: Do not underestimate Gadhafi

Former British Prime Minister Tony Blair cautioned the international community against taking Col. Moammar Gadhafi lightly, as a delegation of African leaders arrived in Tripoli to try to start peace talks between the Libyan dictator and anti-government rebels. Published April 10, 2011

Educators urge reduced federal role in schools

The federal government must reduce its footprint in education and give local school systems more flexibility to craft curricula and measure student performance, school leaders from across the country told a House committee hearing Thursday. Published April 7, 2011

Black

Black bows out abruptly as NYC schools chief

Amid plummeting approval ratings, former publishing executive Cathie Black resigned Thursday as chancellor of New York City schools, one of the most high-profile posts in American education, after fewer than 100 days on the job. Published April 7, 2011

GAO hits programs for making teachers better

Shoddy oversight and a lack of reliable testing methods make it difficult to know which federal programs geared to improve teacher quality are working, U.S. Comptroller General Gene L. Dodaro told a House hearing Wednesday. Published April 6, 2011