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Cal Thomas

Cal Thomas

Cal Thomas is one of the most widely syndicated political columnists in America. Based in Washington, he is a wide-ranging social commentator, not a "beltway insider," who supports traditional conservative values and the American "can-do spirit." He'll take on virtually any topic, from the decline of the family to growing terrorism worldwide.

A columnist for 30 years, his latest book is "What Works: Common Sense Solutions for a Stronger America." Readers may email Mr. Thomas at tcaeditors@tribune.com.

Articles by Cal Thomas

Henry Sanchez, 18, is one of the students charged with rape. (Associated Press)

Maryland's 'safe' environment

A rough translation of Maryland's state motto is "Strong Deeds, Gentle Words." In the case of a 14-year-old girl who was recently raped and sodomized in a restroom at Rockville High School by two males students, both immigrants, one facing a deportation hearing, that motto in practice has been reversed. Published March 22, 2017

Obamacare Stain on the GOP Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Purity and politics

Readers of a certain age may recall ads for Ivory Soap, which claimed to be 99 and forty-four one-hundredths percent pure. If the soap could have reached 100 percent purity, the company would likely have made the claim. Published March 20, 2017

Trump Budget Ax Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Seizing a historic opportunity

President Trump presents his first budget to Congress on Thursday. It is, as The Washington Post points out, "historic" because if adopted, it would be the biggest contraction in the federal government since the end of World War II. Predictably, a Post story focuses on the number of federal workers it estimates could lose their jobs, rather than on whether those jobs and the programs associated with them are necessary. Published March 15, 2017

The Great Pumpkin Rises Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

America's longest war

Gov. Andrew Cuomo wants to spend $1.4 billion of New York's resources to solve the persistent problem of poverty in central Brooklyn. If he wins legislative approval, Mr. Cuomo, a Democrat, intends to spend the money on affordable housing, job training, anti-violence programs, recreational space, even obesity. Some cynics suggest the proposal is targeted at boosting Mr. Cuomo's presidential prospects in 2020, but let's give him the benefit of the doubt and take his proposals seriously. Published March 13, 2017

Illustration on CIA spying by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Wiki-flood

Most Americans, I suspect, have the attitude that if the government is spying on someone there is probably a good reason. In the latest document dump by WikiLeaks, Julian Assange's outfit may cause some to rethink that premise. Published March 8, 2017

Illustration on Trump's economic performance versus claims of Russian scandal by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Trump effect

Here are two scenarios. One: you are a retiree who in recent years has been concerned about the value of your stock portfolio. Suddenly, the value of your stocks and stock-based mutual funds surges, the Dow rising 1,000 points to record highs within weeks. Published March 6, 2017

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with House and Senate leadership, Wednesday, March 1, 2017, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump reinvents himself

For Republicans who have been concerned that President Trump has not been specific about his policies and about where he wants to take the country, Tuesday night's address to Congress and the nation was a welcome relief. For liberals, however, it was a problem precisely because he offered specifics. Published March 1, 2017

Illustration on the inner workings of reporters by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Toward better relations with the press

Before becoming a newspaper columnist I was a broadcast news reporter for local TV stations and occasionally appeared on the NBC radio and television networks. I have some experience at being on the receiving end of hostilities directed at the media. Published February 27, 2017

Milo Yiannopoulos listens during a news conference in New York, Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017. Yiannopoulos has resigned as editor of Breitbart Tech after coming under fire from other conservatives over comments on sexual relationships between boys and older men. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

What happened to conservative optimism?

I had never heard of Milo Yiannopoulos until recently, perhaps because I don't visit some of the websites where his musings are published. Published February 22, 2017

Trump Relationship with the Main Stream Media Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Donald Trump's demolition derby

The traditional media have decided not to take President Trump's insults lying down. After what may be the strongest -- and to his supporters -- most thrilling takedown of journalists by any president, Editor and Publisher magazine featured this headline: "Newspapers Aim to Ride 'Trump Bump' to Reach Readers, Advertisers." Published February 20, 2017

President Donald Trump looks at Education Secretary Betsy DeVos as he speaks during a meeting with parents and teachers, Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2017, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

A new direction on education

American public school students fall well behind students around the world in math and science proficiency. This is not debatable. According to the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study, both cited in The New York Times in 2012, "Fourth- and eighth-grade students in the United States continue to lag behind students in several East Asian countries and some European nations in math and science, although American fourth-graders are closer to the top performers in reading." Published February 15, 2017

Illustration for Cal Thomas' appreciation of his wife, Charlotte Ray Thomas by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A tribute to Charlotte Ray

My wife of 51 years passed away last Saturday after a long battle against multiple health issues. Published February 13, 2017

President Donald Trump speaks in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017. The Associated Press has learned that another nonprofit organization is rejecting federal grant money to fight against violent extremism under President Donald Trump's administration. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Major media remain in denial

Since Donald Trump's election, the major media have been trying to figure out what they did wrong, given their fawning coverage of Hillary Clinton and their anti-Trump stories. Didn't they help twice elect Barack Obama? Why didn't the formula work this time? Published February 8, 2017

President Donald Trump salutes a Marines honor guard as he disembarks from Marine One upon arrival at the White House in Washington, Monday, Feb. 6, 2017 from a trip to Florida. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

'Be careful what you wish for'

At the National Prayer Breakfast last week, President Trump promised to "totally destroy" the so-called Johnson Amendment, a law that prohibits churches from endorsing or opposing political candidates at the risk of losing their tax-exempt status. Published February 6, 2017

Illustration on the current wave of protests by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The left's narrative

Just days into the Trump administration, the left's narrative is clear. First, it was that Donald Trump is an "illegitimate" president because he didn't win the popular vote, claims about "voter fraud" notwithstanding. Published February 1, 2017

Illustration on Trump's active first week in office by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The spectacular week that was

Republican members of Congress met in Philadelphia last weekend for what was called a retreat. It might have been more accurately labeled an advance. Published January 30, 2017

President Donald Trump holds up an executive order for border security and immigration enforcement improvements after signing the order during a visit to the Homeland Security Department headquarters in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Feeling good, so far

President Trump's critics are finding it difficult to stay focused following a flurry of actions taken by the new American CEO. Published January 25, 2017

Passing the Torch Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump's rhetoric and reality

President Trump's inaugural address may not have risen to the rhetorical level of John F. Kennedy ("The torch has been passed to a new generation of Americans" and "Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country"), or Ronald Reagan's critique of government ("Government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem"), or even Barack Obama's in 2009 ("On this day, we gather because we have chosen hope over fear, unity of purpose over conflict and discord"), but the speech set out large goals, many details of which are yet to be revealed. Published January 23, 2017

Education Quality Harmed by the Teachers Union Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trying a different way

Some years ago a friend of mine wrote a book titled "The Seven Last Words of the Church, or, We've Never Tried It That Way Before." It is about what he regarded as the entrenched bureaucracies in his denomination that are reluctant -- even hostile -- to change. Published January 18, 2017