Cal Thomas | Stories - Washington Times
Skip to content

Cal Thomas

Cal Thomas

Cal Thomas is one of the most widely syndicated political columnists in America. Based in Washington, he is a wide-ranging social commentator, not a "beltway insider," who supports traditional conservative values and the American "can-do spirit." He'll take on virtually any topic, from the decline of the family to growing terrorism worldwide.

A columnist for 30 years, his latest book is "What Works: Common Sense Solutions for a Stronger America." Readers may email Mr. Thomas at tcaeditors@tribune.com.

Articles by Cal Thomas

Illustration on changing bad influences on the U.N. by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Finding use for a 'useless' U.N.

While campaigning for the presidency, Donald Trump more than once referred to the United Nations as a "useless" organization and "not a friend of democracy." Published September 20, 2017

One of 35 immigrants from 23 countries awaits the start of the naturalization ceremony that will transform them into American citizens at Northeast Jackson International Baccalaureate World Middle School in Jackson, Miss., Monday, Sept. 18, 2017. The immigrants underwent an extensive security check as well as study and testing on U.S. history, civics and government, as part of the requirements to earning citizenship documentation. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

The ignorant nation and its legacy

At a National Archives ceremony last Friday in Washington, D.C., 30 immigrants became naturalized U.S. citizens. In a video, President Trump encouraged them to embrace the "full rights, and the sacred duties, that come with American citizenship." Published September 18, 2017

Illustration on Trump's recent deal with congressional Democrats by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump's option play

What just happened? President Trump cut a deal with Democrats to pay for hurricane damage relief and raise the debt ceiling without getting anything in return, except the temporary avoidance of a government shutdown. How to describe this? Was it a sellout, or a pragmatic act? Published September 13, 2017

Illustration on corruption in Italy's support of refugees by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Mafia and the migrants

I spotted them on my way to dinner with a friend near Castel Gandolfo. They are migrants from Africa, sitting by the side of the road outside a "temporary" residence that, for many, appears to have become permanent. They all have cellphones. They all seem oblivious to us as we pass by. Published September 11, 2017

In this file photo dated Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017, a Hungarian police officer stands guard at Serbia's border with Hungary near a makeshift camp for migrants in Horgos, Serbia.  The European Court of Justice on Wednesday Sept.6, 2017, rejected efforts by Hungary and Slovakia to stay out of a European Union scheme to relocate refugees. (AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic, FILE)

On taxes and immigration, look to Hungary

Congress has returned to Washington after another unearned vacation and faces at least two immediate challenges, in addition to the familiar ritual of raising the debt ceiling. Published September 6, 2017

Illustration on Tayyip Erdogan's incremental Islamicization of Turkey by Kevin Kreneck/Tribune Content Agency

Turkey's choice: The past or the future?

Coming from the airport into this city of about 15 million people and 5 million cars, as my driver describes it, I pass ancient Roman ruins and blocks of upscale shops; an old hotel where Agatha Christie penned "Murder on the Orient Express," smoke shops and modest restaurants, and luxury car dealers. Published September 4, 2017

Armageddon postponed

North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un appears to have blinked and President Trump can claim a foreign policy victory and justification for his strategy. Published August 30, 2017

Sheriff Joe Arpaio

Pardoning Sheriff Arpaio

President Trump's pardon of Joe Arpaio, the former sheriff of Maricopa County, Ariz., has drawn predictable responses. The left, which long ago exceeded its sell-by date when it comes to ideas that work, denounced the decision as racist (that's all they have) and a perversion of justice. Some moderates, like Sen. John McCain and Sen. Jeff Flake, both Arizona Republicans, Speaker Paul Ryan, Wisconsin Republican, and former Florida Republican Gov. Jeb Bush, joined the critics. Published August 30, 2017

The Bottomless Pit of Afghanistan Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A pit of frustration in Afghanistan

President Trump is not the first U.S. leader to pivot when it comes to foreign policy. His speech Monday night before American military personnel at Fort Myer in Arlington, Va., was in stark contrast to his campaign pledge to put "America first" and his promise to avoid "foreign entanglements," as George Washington put it in his Farewell Address. Published August 23, 2017

Illustration on removing Confederate statues and monuments by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

Historical hysteria

We will learn even less from history if we wipe it clean, as some are trying to do by removing statues of Confederate leaders whose beliefs about slavery and race most, including me, find offensive. Conversation beats censorship. Published August 21, 2017

Illustration on North Korea's backing down by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Armageddon postponed

North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un appears to have blinked and President Trump can claim a foreign policy victory and justification for his strategy. Published August 16, 2017

Illustration on white supremacist groups by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Tragedy in Charlottesville

Rejection of ethnic, national or racial hatred should unite all Americans Published August 15, 2017

Illustration on white supremacist groups by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Tragedy in Charlottesville

In the South during the Jim Crow era, the "one-drop rule," codified into law, asserted that if a person had just one drop of African-American blood, they were considered "black." I wonder what we'd learn if we gave former KKK leader David Duke and the "white nationalists" who caused havoc in Charlottesville last Saturday a DNA test to determine their racial makeup? Published August 14, 2017

Illustration on sanctuary cities as hideouts by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Sanctuary cities vs. hideouts

In biblical times, a sanctuary city was a place where someone who had committed unintentional manslaughter could find refuge from "the avenger of blood." If the offender left the sanctuary city, he could be set upon by a relative of the dead person and killed. No sanctuary was available to anyone who committed murder with malice aforethought. Published August 9, 2017

Illustration on immigration, assimilation and common sense by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Common sense is sighted in Washington

Sometimes what used to be called "common sense" can seem radical in Washington, which is used to practicing senseless policies and funding programs that don't work. Published August 7, 2017

President Trump embraced a Republican-sponsored bill last week that would trim the broad range of family relationships that qualify for immigration and inject a government screen for needed skills and English proficiency into employer immigration. (Associated Press/File)

Wars and rumors of wars

One month after the election, President-elect Donald Trump made a "victory tour" of states that had helped deliver his surprise win. Published August 2, 2017

President Donald Trump hugs retired Army medic James McCloughan after bestowing the nation's highest military honor, the Medal of Honor, to him, during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House, Monday, July 31, 2017, at Washington. McCloughan is credited with saving the lives of members of his platoon nearly 50 years ago in the Battle of Nui Yon Hill in Vietnam. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

When the president is not the enemy

The Establishment, a construct of Democrats and Republicans that rules in Washington no matter which party controls government, appears to be over its fainting spell following Donald Trump's election. It is now throwing everything at him from a daily -- make that hourly, even minute by minute -- onslaught of investigations to big media's equivalent of Molotov cocktails. Published July 31, 2017

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of N.Y., leads fellow Democratic Senators to meet supporters outside the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, July 25, 2017, after the Senate voted to start debating Republican legislation to tear down much of the Obama health care law. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Democrats' 'better deal' is a raw deal

Theodore Roosevelt offered Americans a "Square Deal." His fifth cousin, Franklin D. Roosevelt, gave us "The New Deal." Modern Democrats, who have lost election after election, are now offering the country "A Better Deal." Published July 26, 2017

Righting the Ship of Security Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A plan to save Social Security

It is no secret that what the major media seem to care most about is radically different from what concerns average Americans. While the inside-the-Beltway crowd continues to focus on alleged collusion between President Trump and Russia, real concerns like the future of Social Security are ignored. Published July 24, 2017