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Cal Thomas

Cal Thomas

Cal Thomas is one of the most widely syndicated political columnists in America. Based in Washington, he is a wide-ranging social commentator, not a "beltway insider," who supports traditional conservative values and the American "can-do spirit." He'll take on virtually any topic, from the decline of the family to growing terrorism worldwide.

A columnist for 30 years, his latest book is "What Works: Common Sense Solutions for a Stronger America." Readers may email Mr. Thomas at tcaeditors@tribune.com.

Articles by Cal Thomas

Illustration on France's response to Islamic terrorism by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

Is Paris burning?

The late Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist for the Los Angeles Times, Paul Conrad, frequently used religious symbols to illustrate his point of view. Conrad drew the ire of some readers whenever he used the Star of David or a cross in his drawings. Letters to the editor denounced him, but to my knowledge no one showed up at the newspaper to kill him. Published January 12, 2015

Mario Cuomo Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Mario Cuomo: The rhetoric and the record

How precious in the sight of progressives was one of their saints, Mario Cuomo, the three-term governor of New York who died last week at age 82. He was a model of progressivism and a gifted rhetorician. Published January 5, 2015

FILE - This undated image posted on Aug. 27, 2014 by the Raqqa Media Center of the Islamic State group, a Syrian opposition group, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, shows a fighter of the Islamic State group waving their flag from inside a captured government fighter jet following the battle for the Tabqa air base, in Raqqa, Syria.  The Islamic State group is test flying, with the help of former Iraqi air force pilots, several fighter jets captured earlier from air bases belonging to the Syrian military, a Syrian activist group said Friday, Oct. 17, 2014. The report by the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights could not be independently confirmed, and U.S. official said they had no reports of Islamic State group militants flying jets in support of their forces on the ground.(AP Photo/ Raqqa Media Center of the Islamic State group)

West’s dearth of values emboldens Muslim extremists

The commander of American special operations in the Middle East, Maj. Gen. Michael K. Nagata, is reported to be seeking help in learning why the Islamic State is so dangerous. If he doesn't know, what does that say about the prospect for victory over these radical terrorists who seek to destroy everyone who disagrees with them? Published December 31, 2014

Decadence leads to decline, and America shows the telltale signs

In the film, "Girl Interrupted," Winona Ryder plays an 18-year-old who enters a mental institution for what is diagnosed as borderline personality disorder. The year is 1967, and the country is in turmoil over Vietnam and civil rights. While lying on her bed one night and watching TV, she sees a news report about a demonstration. The narrator says something that might apply to today's turmoil: "We live in a time of doubt. The institutions we once trusted no longer seem reliable." Published December 29, 2014

Illustration on the value of the Christmas story by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

There is everything to gain and nothing to lose in embracing the Christmas story

Suppose what some call the "Christmas story" is true — all of it, from the angels, to the shepherds, to the virgin birth, to God taking on human flesh. By this, I don't mean to suggest it is true only for those who believe it to be true, but what if it is objectively true, no matter what the deniers say? What difference would it make? Should it make any difference? Published December 24, 2014

Illustration on Obama's new policy toward Cuba by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Cuba libre!

Rather than try to block the partial lifting of the embargo, the new Republican Congress should require reciprocity from the Cuban government before lifting additional restrictions. Published December 22, 2014

The Ghost of Flight 93 Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Thwarting U.S. defenses will lead only to more American victims

The attack on a cafe in Sydney, Australia, by a self-described Islamic cleric with a long police record, left two hostages dead, along with the cleric. That incident, which was televised worldwide, was quickly eclipsed by the massacre of 145 people at an army-run school in Peshawar, Pakistan. How is the West responding to these and other atrocities? More important, how is the Muslim world responding? Published December 17, 2014

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence

Mike Pence's Hoosier humility could be in demand for 2016

If success at the state level were enough to recommend someone for president of the United States, Gov. Mike Pence of Indiana would be among the front-runners for the 2016 Republican nomination. Published December 15, 2014

Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin says Republicans need to show up in minority neighborhoods and ask what has voting for Democrats gotten them? It's a good question..  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Rep. Paul Ryan's hope for a Congress that works

Like two predatory animals circling each other, Republicans and Democrats are trying to sort out the meaning of last month's election and plan strategies for the remaining days of the current Congress and the new one in which Republicans will hold majorities in both houses. Published December 8, 2014

Businesses were left in piles of rubble in the aftermath of violence and looting in Ferguson, Missouri, on the night of Nov. 24.    Associated Press photo

Paying a price for their Ferguson mayhem

No matter whose side you are on in the upheaval following the killing of Michael Brown by Police Officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Missouri, everyone should agree on the profound sadness of it all: sadness that an 18-year-old boy-man walked a path that led to his destruction; sadness that a police officer felt the need to defend himself by shooting another human being; sadness over the rioting and looting that followed a grand jury's decision not to indict Officer Wilson; and, for some, sadness that Officer Wilson was not indicted. Published December 1, 2014

Larry Kawa says President Obama's unilateral changes to immigration law exemplify a pattern of executive overreach. (Illustration of effects of illegal alien order on American blacks by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times)

How about putting Americans first?

The framers of the Constitution sought to limit the power of government and expand individual liberty. President Obama sees it the other way. Whether he violated the constitutional limits of his power will be debated and possibly decided in the courts and by the new Republican majority in Congress, but there is another issue surrounding the amnesty order that needs addressing. Published November 24, 2014

Illustration on the real results of Obama's so-called immigration reform by Linas Garsys/The WAshington Times

Unfaithfully executing the law

President Obama is soon expected to issue an executive order that would make it possible for some illegal immigrants to live and work in this country without the threat of deportation, in effect granting amnesty to up to 5 million people. Published November 17, 2014