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Cal Thomas

Cal Thomas

Cal Thomas is one of the most widely syndicated political columnists in America. Based in Washington, he is a wide-ranging social commentator, not a "beltway insider," who supports traditional conservative values and the American "can-do spirit." He'll take on virtually any topic, from the decline of the family to growing terrorism worldwide.

A columnist for 30 years, his latest book is "What Works: Common Sense Solutions for a Stronger America." Readers may email Mr. Thomas at tcaeditors@tribune.com.

Articles by Cal Thomas

Righting the Ship of Security Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A plan to save Social Security

It is no secret that what the major media seem to care most about is radically different from what concerns average Americans. While the inside-the-Beltway crowd continues to focus on alleged collusion between President Trump and Russia, real concerns like the future of Social Security are ignored. Published July 24, 2017

Illustration on government overspending by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Porking out with your money

Citizens Against Government Waste (CAGW), a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization working to eliminate governmental waste and fraud, just released its "2017 Congressional Pig Book," an annual publication highlighting wasteful government spending that should embarrass each and every member of Congress. Published July 19, 2017

Ronald Reagan on the Tonight Show in 1975          The Washington Times

'Here's Ronnie!'

While scanning YouTube videos, I came across an appearance by Ronald Reagan on "The Tonight Show," hosted by Johnny Carson. The year was 1975 and Mr. Reagan was "between jobs," having left office as governor of California, where he served for eight years, but not yet president. He would challenge Gerald Ford for the Republican nomination in 1976, barely losing at the nominating convention, but setting himself up for what would be a successful run in 1980. Published July 17, 2017

This is an undated photo of sick baby Charlie Gard provided by his family, taken at Great Ormond Street Hospital in London. A British court will assess new evidence Monday July 10, 2017, in the case of 11-month-old Charlie Gard as his mother pleaded with judges to allow the terminally ill infant to receive experimental treatment for his rare genetic disease, mitochondrial depletion syndrome. (Family of Charlie Gard via AP)

The state is not God

Anyone looking for another reason not to leave life-and-death issues to the state need look no further than the conflict between the British government and the parents of 11-month-old Charlie Gard. Published July 12, 2017

FILE - In this June 30, 2017 file photo, President Donald Trump speaks in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. Trump pressed Congress on Monday, July 10, 2017, to get health care done before leaving for its long August recess, even as Republican senators say the GOP effort so far to repeal and replace the nation's health law is probably dead.  (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

President Trump's needed vision

In 1987 when he was contemplating a run for president, Vice President George H.W. Bush was criticized for his inability to articulate an agenda for the country. A friend suggested he spend a weekend alone at Camp David to figure out where he would take the nation. Published July 10, 2017

Trump Trouble with Twitter Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why not try the gentle answer?

President Trump once referred to the health care bill passed by the House as "mean." So how should we characterize his remarks about MSNBC "Morning Joe" co-host Mika Brzezinski? The president of the United States, reacting to her criticism of him, claimed Ms. Brzezinski was "bleeding" from a face-lift when he saw her last New Year's Eve at his Florida resort. He further described her as being "dumb as a rock." That's worse than mean. It's cruel. Published July 3, 2017

Illustration on the latest Supreme Court decisions by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Two wins for Trump

The Supreme Court's decision to allow portions of President Trump's travel ban to proceed is a much-needed victory for the administration. The high court ruled that those "who lack any bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States" could be denied entry into the U.S. The ban targets those from six majority-Muslim countries, halting entry until "extreme vetting" can be conducted. Published June 28, 2017

Illustration on duplication in government programs by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Unhealthy acts

Is there anyone who can point to the "Affordable Care Act" (aka Obamacare) and credibly claim it is accomplishing the goals set for it seven years ago? Published June 26, 2017

Illustration on the fiscal plight of Puerto Rico by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A sinking feeling in Puerto Rico

The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico is drowning. The island, so popular with tourists, is $123 billion in debt. That's more debt than the $18 billion bankruptcy filed by the city of Detroit in 2013. In May, San Juan declared a form of bankruptcy after creditors filed lawsuits demanding their money. A federal district judge appointed by Chief Justice John Roberts will handle the case. Published June 21, 2017

Illustration on responding to political rage by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why so much rage?

That didn't take long. Less than 48 hours after the shooting rampage targeting Republican members of Congress and their staff on a baseball field in Alexandria, Va., followed by the picture of Republicans and Democrats kneeling in prayer at Nationals Park before their annual charity game, things returned to normal or abnormal. Published June 19, 2017

Illustrations on the implications of the religious Left's renewed participation in politics by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The religious left's second coming

The religious left feels left out. According to an article in The New York Times, liberal clergy feel excluded from the political arena and blame the religious right for occupying what they once believed was their exclusive territory. They are, according to the story's headline, "seeking to break right's grip on nation's moral agenda." Published June 14, 2017

President Donald Trump steps off Air Force One as he arrives at Newark Liberty International Airport in Newark, N.J., Friday, June 9, 2017. Trump is spending the weekend at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Lying liars

All politicians lie, because they are human and all humans lie. The question before us is this: If President Trump lied to FBI Director James Comey, should that "lie" lead to impeachment? Did he obstruct justice when he allegedly "hoped" that Mr. Comey would not pursue an investigation of former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn? Many Democrats think so. Most Republicans do not. Published June 12, 2017

Red Light Terrorist Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

If it walks like a terrorist

In television it's called a "loop," the replaying of the same scene over and over and over again. Published June 7, 2017

President Donald Trump gestures while speaking about the U.S. role in the Paris climate change accord, Thursday, June 1, 2017, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Hysteria over the Paris pullout

For sheer hilarity and hyperbole it's hard to beat a recent headline on a Washington Post editorial opposing President Trump's decision to remove the United States from the nonbinding and unenforceable Paris Climate Agreement. Published June 5, 2017

Illustration on the sate of the European Union by Daniel Marsula/Tribune Content Agency

What price separation from Europe?

German Chancellor Angela Merkel has had enough of President Trump. Speaking last Sunday in a Munich beer hall, Ms. Merkel suggested that Europe may no longer be able to rely on the United States as a faithful ally and that the continent "really must take our fate into our own hands." Published May 31, 2017

Illustration on Saudia Arabian duplicity by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Saudi Arabia's duplicity

Trusting Saudi Arabia to combat terrorists and extremists and "drive them out," as President Trump called on the kingdom and other Arab and Muslim nations to do in his Riyadh speech, is akin to forging an alliance with the Ku Klux Klan to combat racism and anti-Semitism. Published May 24, 2017

In this May 18, 1971 file photo, political consultant Roger Ailes, who died last week, is shown in his office in New York. From communications guru and TV producer to Chairman-CEO of Fox News Channel, Ailes' used a "fair and balanced" branding approach, targeted at viewers who believed other cable-news networks, and maybe even the media overall, displayed a liberal tilt from which Fox News delivered them with "unvarnished truth." Associated Press photo

The genius of Roger Ailes

Roger Ailes was no genius, not in the league of Stephen Hawking and Albert Einstein. The founding chairman of Fox News Channel, who died last week from complications after suffering a fall, understood and respected Middle America from whence he came. Published May 22, 2017

Scotland's First Minister Nicola Sturgeon talks, during First Minister's Questions at the Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh, Thursday May 11, 2017. Britain will hold a general election on June 8. (Jane Barlow/PA via AP)

The big hack attack and the NHS

The ransomware cyberattack that wormed its way into at least 74 countries recently exposed new vulnerabilities in the United Kingdom's National Health Service (NHS), as if it weren't vulnerable enough. Published May 17, 2017