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Cal Thomas

Cal Thomas

Cal Thomas is one of the most widely syndicated political columnists in America. Based in Washington, he is a wide-ranging social commentator, not a "beltway insider," who supports traditional conservative values and the American "can-do spirit." He'll take on virtually any topic, from the decline of the family to growing terrorism worldwide.

A columnist for 30 years, his latest book is "What Works: Common Sense Solutions for a Stronger America." Readers may email Mr. Thomas at tcaeditors@tribune.com.

Articles by Cal Thomas

Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks to the reporters at United Nations headquarters, Tuesday, March 10, 2015.  Clinton conceded that she should have used a government email to conduct business as secretary of state, saying her decision was simply a matter of "convenience." (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Hillary's matter of convenience

The only way to put this to rest is for Mrs. Clinton to allow the FBI access to her server. Published March 11, 2015

Illustration on African-American progress and challenges by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

A half-century after Selma

I liked the movie "Selma," though it could have done without the rap song during credits that referenced "hands up, don't shoot," a slogan that emerged from the shooting of Michael Brown by a Ferguson, Missouri, police officer whose actions the Justice Department recently determined did not "constitute prosecutable violations" of federal civil rights law. Published March 9, 2015

Failing New York Schools Illustration by Nancy Ohanian

Taylor Swift's poor investment

Pop star Taylor Swift has donated $50,000 to the New York City public school system. Miss Swift, who was named the world's sixth most powerful celebrity by Forbes magazine, has commendably performed numerous acts of charity since moving into her $20 million Tribeca residence last year, including visits with sick children at Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Published March 4, 2015

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks at the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) Policy Conference in Washington, Monday, March 2, 2015. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Bibi at the barricade

Iran cannot be trusted to honor any nuclear agreement. Published March 2, 2015

Illegal immigrants sit in a group after being detained by U.S. Border Patrol agents in McAllen, Texas. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Stop the immigration flood

It's long past time to stop the influx, to seal the border and to cease allowing immigrants from nations where terrorism thrives. Published February 25, 2015

Lawyer and former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani comments on a lawsuit filed against video game giant Activision by former Panamanian dictator Manuel Noriega outside Los Angeles Superior court in Los Angeles Thursday, Oct. 16, 2014. Noriega claims his likeness was used without permission in "Call of Duty: Black Ops II" and he was portrayed as a murderer and enemy of the state. Activision attorneys said allowing the case to proceed would make it difficult to include historical figures in games, books and other creative works. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge William F. Fahey did not signal during an hour long hearing Thursday how he might rule. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

Love, American style

Rudolph W. Giuliani, the former mayor of New York City, is taking some heat — and winning praise in some quarters — for remarks he made at a private dinner last week at which he questioned President Obama's love for America. Published February 23, 2015

Illustration on the value of the U.S. Constitution by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Chris Cuomo: 'Our rights do not come from God'

The framers of the Constitution clearly understood that in order to put certain rights out of the reach of government, those rights had to come from a place government could not reach. Published February 18, 2015

Nerobama Illustration by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Barack Obama, America's Nero

President Theodore Roosevelt said, "Speak softly, and carry a big stick." More than a century later, President Obama speaks loudly (and incessantly) and carries a twig. Published February 16, 2015

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal talks about his plan for national education reform at a policy breakfast on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Feb. 9, 2015. If he runs for president, Jindal is expected to make education a central part of his message with a focus on his opposition to Common Core.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Bobby Jindal for president?

Governor Jindal of Louisiana may be a more formidable force than some people realize. Published February 11, 2015

Illustration on Obama's prayer breakfast failure to criticize militant Islamists by Alexander Hunter/ The Washington Times

Let us prey?

There was a time when the 63-year-old National Prayer Breakfast was a rather mundane affair. It rarely made news. Speakers — evangelist Billy Graham spoke at most of the early ones — talked about Jesus and salvation. Presidents, beginning with Dwight D. Eisenhower, would follow with unremarkable comments mostly ignored or relegated to the religion page by the secular press. Published February 9, 2015

Illustration on government policies causing disuniy in America by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A hyphenated nation

As if we aren't already divided enough by race, class, gender, political party, economic status and sexual orientation, the federal government is reportedly thinking about creating a new category of Americans just in time for the next census. Published February 4, 2015

Illustration on caveats connected with political candidates' professions of faith by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The faith factor, 2016 edition

We are one year away from the Iowa caucuses and already several Republican presidential candidates are trying to secure an advantage by talking about their faith. Published February 2, 2015

A New York City snowplow, loaded with salt, sits parked in midtown Manhattan as light snow falls, Monday, Jan. 26, 2015. Northeast residents are girding for a heavy snowstorm that could bury communities from northern New Jersey to southern Maine in up to 2 feet of snow. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Another snow job

Today, politicians and their ideological fellow travelers in the media use the normal cycles of the seasons to promote "climate change." Published January 28, 2015

Illustration on the effectiveness of sonograms in deterring the choice to abort by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A GOP abortion bill shouldn't resemble a 'war on women'

As thousands descended on Washington last week for the annual March for Life, the Republican House of Representatives was busy watering down an anti-abortion bill that restricted abortions after 20 weeks, except in cases of rape or incest, with exemptions allowed only after a police report had been filed. This after a small group of moderate Republican female lawmakers challenged the bill and lobbied for a less restrictive measure. Published January 26, 2015

Illustration on The State of the Union Address by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama sings the same old song

Here's a suggestion for Joni Ernst, the new Republican senator from Iowa, who will deliver the GOP response to the State of the Union address Tuesday night. Get a chorus together and open with this old Sammy Cahn-Jule Styne number: "It seems to me I've heard that song before; it's from an old familiar score, I know it well, that melody." Published January 19, 2015

Illustration on France's response to Islamic terrorism by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

Is Paris burning?

The late Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist for the Los Angeles Times, Paul Conrad, frequently used religious symbols to illustrate his point of view. Conrad drew the ire of some readers whenever he used the Star of David or a cross in his drawings. Letters to the editor denounced him, but to my knowledge no one showed up at the newspaper to kill him. Published January 12, 2015

Mario Cuomo Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Mario Cuomo: The rhetoric and the record

How precious in the sight of progressives was one of their saints, Mario Cuomo, the three-term governor of New York who died last week at age 82. He was a model of progressivism and a gifted rhetorician. Published January 5, 2015