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Cal Thomas

Cal Thomas

Cal Thomas is one of the most widely syndicated political columnists in America. Based in Washington, he is a wide-ranging social commentator, not a "beltway insider," who supports traditional conservative values and the American "can-do spirit." He'll take on virtually any topic, from the decline of the family to growing terrorism worldwide.

A columnist for 30 years, his latest book is "What Works: Common Sense Solutions for a Stronger America." Readers may email Mr. Thomas at tcaeditors@tribune.com.

Articles by Cal Thomas

Weakness as a shortcut to war

When I was a kid, there was a bully in our neighborhood. He never picked on kids his own size and certainly not on anyone larger. Rather, he punched, pushed and kicked kids smaller and weaker than himself, especially those who refused to respond to his threats. Stirred by his adversaries' impotent responses, the bully felt free to slug anyone he fancied. Published September 22, 2009

Playing the racism card

When Barack Obama was elected president of the United States, some suggested that race played a factor in his success. People "wanted" to elect a black man president because of our history of slavery and the denial of civil rights for so many years to blacks. It is never "racism" to vote for someone because he is black. It is only racism to oppose the policies of a black Democrat. Published September 17, 2009

Liar, Liar

Wouldn't it be nice, as the Beach Boys sang in another context, if there was such a thing as a liar meter? It would detect when a politician wasn't telling the truth and alert the public. In the absence of such an invention, we are left to challenge our political leadership based on an objective look at the facts. Published September 16, 2009

The reason for our discontent

Who wrote the following: "We must learn to welcome and not to fear the voices of dissent. We must dare to think about 'unthinkable things' because when things become unthinkable, thinking stops and action becomes mindless." Published September 10, 2009

No real quid pro quo

HBO showed the film "Schindler's List" last week. The 1993 Steven Spielberg movie never ceases to arouse my deepest emotions. The perennial question put forth in the film remains: How could people wantonly kill so many others as a matter of state policy? Published September 9, 2009

Languishing in liberal land

Despite their control of all three branches of government, this has not been a good summer for liberal Democrats. Their health care "reform" bill, which has yet to be fully written, much less fully funded, has been exposed at town-hall meetings as a power grab over life and death with the strong possibility that "do no harm" will be replaced by a utilitarian approach to treatment. Published September 3, 2009

Judgment vs. judgmentalism

Opinion columnists, like the rest of humanity, walk a fine line between judgment (holding people accountable to a standard we did not create) and judgmentalism (thinking ourselves morally superior because we haven't committed the acts of others). Published September 1, 2009

Opposing suicide 'justice'

After pledging during last year's presidential campaign, and as recently as the spring, not to revisit the past, the Obama administration, in the person of Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr., has named a special prosecutor to go after CIA interrogators who pried information from terrorist suspects, preventing more deadly assaults on the country. Published August 30, 2009

A surprising friendship

Most of my adult life has been intertwined with the Kennedy family. As a freshman at American University in 1960, I stayed up late watching the election returns, as John F. Kennedy barely eked out a victory over Richard Nixon. Published August 27, 2009

National suicide by overspending

Remember when the deficit was so bad that Democrats said we (or, more accurately, the Republicans) were placing a terrible burden on our grandchildren? Published August 25, 2009

Catch a falling star

Seven months after taking office amid a religious-like faith that he was the one (or even The One) we had been waiting for, President Obama is beginning to resemble a shooting star. Published August 20, 2009

National Health vs. USA

For the past month, I have watched British media report and comment on the American health care uproar. American cable networks also are available here. The back-and-forth reporting and commentary resemble a replay of the War of 1812, this time with verbal salvos. Published August 18, 2009

Invasion by immigration

The Daily Telegraph's headline is meant to shock, or at least get the attention of Europeans apathetic about the threat they face: "A Fifth of European Union Will Be Muslim by 2050." Published August 13, 2009

Getting rid of granny

The debate -- OK, the shouting match -- we are having over "health care reform" is about many things, including cost, who gets help and who does not and who, or what, gets to make that determination. Published August 11, 2009

Fame: Not going to live forever

What is it about celebrity that so fascinates us? And it is celebrity, not fame. As the now defunct New Times magazine editorialized 30 years ago, "There are almost no famous people anymore; only celebrities." Published July 2, 2009

Selective meddling

Help me out here. President Obama immediately "meddles" in the affairs of Honduras, denouncing a military coup, the intent of which is to preserve the country's constitution, but when it comes to Iran's fraudulent election and the violent repression of demonstrators who wanted their votes counted, the president initially vacillates and equivocates. Published July 2, 2009

She cheered me on

I used to enjoy discussing with Mary Lou Forbes the heady days of real journalism when there were more than two newspapers in Washington and people spent time reading them. Published June 29, 2009

Obama's shifting stance

There was a noticeable change in the climate during President Obama's Tuesday news conference that had nothing to do with the heat and humidity, the excuse given for moving the event indoors from the Rose Garden. Those Chicago boys (and girls) know all about cold winters, but if they think 80 degrees and partly cloudy is hot, wait until August, when the three H's - hot (95 degrees), humid (95 percent) and hazy - take over. Published June 28, 2009

Should we forgive him?

The first thing that should be acknowledged about South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford's admission to an extramarital affair is that it could happen to any of us. That is not an excuse (and no, it has not happened to me, or to my wife). Every married person has heard the voice; the one that says you deserve something "better." Published June 26, 2009

THOMAS: Bulldozing American cities

There are perhaps dozens of small towns and failing neighborhoods beginning to resemble ghost towns. We've all seen them if we have gotten off the interstate and driven down state or county roads and once-thriving Main Streets or into blighted neighborhoods. Published June 16, 2009