Cheryl K. Chumley | Stories - Washington Times
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Cheryl K. Chumley

Cheryl K. Chumley

Cheryl Chumley is online opinion editor for The Washington Times, the author of “The Devil in DC: Winning Back the Country From the Beast in Washington” and of "Police State USA: How Orwell’s Nightmare is Becoming Our Reality," and a 2008-2009 Robert Novak journalism fellow with The Fund for American Studies. Email her at cchumley@washingtontimes.com. 

Articles by Cheryl K. Chumley

** FILE ** Grover Norquist is president of Americans for Tax Reform. (Associated Press)

Grover Norquist: Sen. Ted Cruz owes GOP an apology

Americans for Tax Reform president Grover Norquist has ratcheted up his criticisms of Sen. Ted Cruz, calling the Texas tea party hero a poor political planner and demanding he apologize to fellow Republicans for his relentless push to defund Obamacare. Published October 9, 2013

A Marine team carries a transfer case containing the remains of Marine Lance Cpl. Joshua H. Birchfield at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware on Sunday. According to the Department of Defense, Cpl. Birchfield, of LaPorte, Ind., died while supporting Operation Enduring Freedom. (Associated Press)

17 grieving families of troops killed in action decry halt of death payment

So far, 17 families have been left in the cold on death benefit payouts of $100,000 for their killed-in-action military loved ones, due to the failure of U.S. authorities to clarify how the payout should proceed during the government shutdown. And they are outraged. Published October 9, 2013

The sun peeks from behind the Capitol dome on Capitol Hill in Washington on Friday, Oct. 4, 2013, as the budget battle continues. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

John Boehner’s order: Keep congressional gym open

Just because the government has gone into shutdown mode doesn’t mean members of Congress have to give up their exercise routines. Per order of House Speaker John A. Boehner’s office: Keep the members-only workout facility open for use. Published October 9, 2013

(The Washington Times )

Shutdown could delay getting new beers to market

If this is the worst pain you feel from the government shutdown, then you must be doing all right – but still. The government agency in charge of approving new breweries, recipes and labels is on furlough, leaving in limbo the ability of suds-makers to get their brews on store shelves. Published October 9, 2013

** FILE ** A Powerball lottery form is filled out, Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2013, in San Antonio. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

Big loser: $1M Powerball winner misses claim deadline

Easy come, easy go. A Powerball winner in Indiana missed out on a $1 million jackpot after the deadline to claim the prize came and went, and the unknown person failed to turn in the ticket. Published October 9, 2013

U.S. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel speaks with U.S. Ambassador to Egypt Anne Patterson, left, and Egyptian Central Military Zone Chief of Staff Maj. Gen. Mohammed Zamaloo upon his arrival in Cairo, on Wednesday, April 24, 2013. (AP Photo/Jim Watson, Pool)

U.S. to scale back aid to Egypt: report

The Obama administration has been quietly preparing to scale back financial aid to Egypt, due to the ongoing violence and ouster of President Mohammed Morsi — which U.S. officials still refuse to label a coup — and will announce the amount of the cut "in the coming days," an unnamed source told CNN. Published October 9, 2013

Kentucky bans postgame handshakes for high school athletes

The Kentucky High School Athletic Association’s commissioner has banned school athletes from competing teams from shaking hands after the competition, putting to halt a decades-long practice in sports. Published October 9, 2013

** FILE ** In this Wednesday, Dec. 8, 2010 photo, soldiers pay their final respects to 13 fallen soldiers during the monthly Eagle Remembrance Ceremony at the Family Resource Center at Fort Campbell, Ky. (AP Photo/The Leaf-Chronicle, Jake Lowary)

Shutdown of military death benefits stirs national action

A nonprofit group dedicated to helping troops and Marines decided to jump in to assist families of killed military members deprived of their $100,000 death benefits after reading a Washington Times report. Published October 8, 2013

An undated photo provided by the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette newspaper is of  reporter Cathy Frye  in Little Rock, Ark. Frye, an award-winning reporter remained in an El Paso, Texas, hospital Monday, Oct. 7, 2013, one day after she was airlifted by helicopter to safety from Big Bend Ranch State Park in Texas. (AP Photo/Arkansas Democrat-Gazette)    ARKANSAS TIMES OUT; ARKANSAS BUSINESS OUT

Shutdown shame: Hiker nearly killed when park route closed

A hiker who had gone missing for five days at a state park in Texas was just found alive — naked, dehydrated and nearly dead, telling rescuers that she got lost when the government shutdown led authorities to close the only route she knew. Published October 8, 2013

Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus (Associated Press)

RNC tries to woo Hispanic voters with 7-state campaign

Republican National Committee operatives have kicked off a seven-state campaign aimed at drawing in Hispanics and showing them the GOP is the best political home to uphold their interests. Published October 8, 2013

World War II veterans take photos of the National World War II Memorial from behind barricades after the National Park Service closed monuments and national parks because of the government shutdown on Tuesday, October 1, 2013, in Washington. (Andrew S. Geraci/The Washington Times)

Veterans to stage storming of memorials, monuments

Angry and outraged military veterans are heading to Washington this weekend to stage a mass storming of the very memorials and monuments that were created in their honor but that they now cannot access because of the government shutdown. Published October 8, 2013

** FILE ** A solitary runner heads along the banks of the Charles River in Cambridge, Mass., in front of the Boston skyline, at dawn on Tuesday, April 16, 2013, after explosions killed three and injured more than 140 at the Boston Marathon the day before. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Boston-area school looks to back off zero tolerance

A Boston-area school with a high-crime neighborhood backdrop is bucking that national trend for zero tolerance and offering student offenders another way to serve their sentences: Talk it out. Published October 8, 2013