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Cheryl Wetzstein

Cheryl Wetzstein

Cheryl Wetzstein covers family and social issues as a national reporter for The Washington Times. She has been a reporter for three decades, working in New York City and Washington, D.C. Since joining The Washington Times in 1985, she has been a features writer, environmental and consumer affairs reporter, and assistant business editor.

Beginning in 1994, Mrs. Wetzstein worked exclusively on welfare and family issues such as child support enforcement, abstinence and sex education, child welfare, sexually transmitted diseases, marriage, divorce, cohabiting and gay marriage.

She has won several newspaper awards, including 1977 Cub Reporter of the Year and 1983 Heart of New York award, both from the New York Press Club.

Articles by Cheryl Wetzstein

George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Teddy Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln are depicted at Mount Rushmore in South Dakota. (AP Photo/File)

U.S. religious freedom to be honored

As a colonial-era Virginia law upholding religious freedom reaches its 230th anniversary this weekend, traditional values groups are urging Americans to stand up for their rights to live out their beliefs in peace. Published January 14, 2016

Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore reads his administrative order discouraging probate judges from issuing same sex marriage licenses, Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2016, at the Alabama Supreme Court building in Montgomery, Ala. The outspoken chief justice, who previously tried to block gay marriage from coming to the Deep South state, issued an administrative order Wednesday saying the Alabama Supreme Court never lifted a March 2015 directive to probate judges to refuse licenses to gay couples.  (Albert Cesare/The Montgomery Advertiser via AP)

Alabama judges ignore gay marriage order; others obey

Alabama's probate courts remained in conflict Thursday, as some judges ignored an order to stop issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples, while other probate judges stopped issuing licenses to anyone. Published January 7, 2016

Attorney David Dinielli delivers the opening statements for the plaintiff in a fraud trial against Jews Offering New Alternatives for Healing, (JONAH) Wednesday, June 3, 2015, in Jersey City, N.J. The nonprofit New Jersey based group that promised to turn gays heterosexual instead offered "junk science" and lies, Dinielli told jurors Wednesday during opening statements in the fraud trial involving so-called gay conversion therapy. (Alex Remnick/The Star-Ledger via AP, Pool)

N.J. 'gay conversion' group closing mid-January

A New Jersey nonprofit group that sought to help people struggling with their same-sex attractions is ceasing operations this month after losing a civil lawsuit, a media report says. Published January 5, 2016