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Cheryl Wetzstein

Cheryl Wetzstein

Cheryl Wetzstein covers family and social issues as a national reporter for The Washington Times. She has been a reporter for three decades, working in New York City and Washington, D.C. Since joining The Washington Times in 1985, she has been a features writer, environmental and consumer affairs reporter, and assistant business editor.

Beginning in 1994, Mrs. Wetzstein worked exclusively on welfare and family issues such as child support enforcement, abstinence and sex education, child welfare, sexually transmitted diseases, marriage, divorce, cohabiting and gay marriage.

She has won several newspaper awards, including 1977 Cub Reporter of the Year and 1983 Heart of New York award, both from the New York Press Club.

Articles by Cheryl Wetzstein

Divorce hinders poorer children

A new study released Wednesday by the Pew Charitable Trusts shows that the damage divorce does to poorer children's future economic mobility is even greater than the impact suffered from having only one parent. Published May 20, 2010

Divorce hinders poorer children

A new study released Wednesday by the Pew Charitable Trusts shows that the damage divorce does to poorer children's future economic mobility is even greater than the impact suffered from having only one parent. Published May 19, 2010

Head Start rife with enrollment fraud

An undercover investigation into the federal government's Head Start program has found enough enrollment abuses to generate a report to President Obama and a major damage-control effort by the agency that runs the program. Published May 19, 2010

Head Start rife with enrollment fraud

An undercover investigation into the federal government's Head Start program has found enough enrollment abuses to generate a report to President Obama and a major damage-control effort by the agency that runs the program. Published May 18, 2010

WETZSTEIN: Family Rewards results fall short

While researching poverty recently, I caught up with the news about an innovative program that New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg implemented a few years ago. Published May 18, 2010

WETZSTEIN: Family Rewards results fall short

While researching poverty recently, I caught up with the news about an innovative program that New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg implemented a few years ago. Published May 18, 2010

Reaction mixed on proposed poverty measure

The Census Bureau's formal release of an alternative way to measure poverty in the United States is 16 months away, but the rumblings of unease can already be heard about the politically sensitive indicator. Published May 14, 2010

Proposed poverty measure gets mixed response

The Census Bureau's formal release of an alternative way to measure poverty in the United States is 16 months away, but the rumblings of unease can already be heard about the politically sensitive indicator. Published May 14, 2010

Same-sex researcher's defamation claim backed

A leading religious legal defense group said it is standing with George A. Rekers, the conservative expert on gay behavior who has seen his career implode amid media reports that he took a young gay travel companion to Europe with him. Published May 13, 2010

Same-sex researcher's defamation claim backed

A leading religious legal defense group said it is standing with George A. Rekers, the conservative expert on gay behavior who has seen his career implode amid media reports that he took a young gay travel companion to Europe with him. Published May 13, 2010

Pill at 50 still gets hot flashes of debate

As the oral contraceptive enters its own middle age, polls show that public approval of birth control is overwhelming, with only 14 percent of those surveyed saying they thought the pill's impact on society was negative. Published May 6, 2010

Study urges curbing young children's TV time

New evidence suggests that pediatricians are justified in their concerns about toddlers getting too much "screen time": The more TV these young children watched, the more likely they were to have problems with math, classroom engagement and staying slim when they reached the fourth grade, a new study says. Published May 4, 2010

WETZSTEIN: When 'the pill' was just an idea

The 50th anniversary of federal approval of the first birth-control pill arrives May 9. The pill certainly changed the world, but time will tell what problems it solved and what problems it gave birth to. Published May 4, 2010

Insurance-plan coverage for infertility urged

Discovering that one is infertile is like joining "a secret underground club," said Melissa Ford, creator of the award-winning Stirrup Queens blog, at a Capitol Hill briefing Wednesday. Published April 29, 2010

Obama pushes 'second-chance' training

With as many as 6 million youth under age 24 having failed to finish high school, the Obama administration wants to see its many "second-chance" work-training programs have a stronger impact on the lives of those youth, officials told a Washington briefing yesterday. Published April 28, 2010

WETZSTEIN: Sounding alarm on gonorrhea

Gonorrhea, once in decline, has thoroughly rebounded, with more than 336,000 cases reported in 2008. It disproportionately affects young people and blacks. Untreated gonorrhea increases risk for HIV infection and can lead to infertility, among other undesirable outcomes. Published April 27, 2010

Russia, U.S. talks set on adoption suspension

Aiming to end the limbo for children awaiting adoption, U.S. and Russian diplomats will meet next week to address Russia's suspension of all adoptions to the U.S. after a mother returned her son to Moscow. Published April 23, 2010

Inhalant abuse remains a danger

Fewer teens are getting high by inhaling common household products, but with 3,400 products available for dangerous "huffing," prevention efforts are still sorely needed, according to a new study released this week. Published April 21, 2010

WETZSTEIN: Greenies warned of birthrate crash

Global fertility rates are falling, and the final outcome of this "peoplequake" will be the "rise of the wrinklies," the age of the old, writes award-winning journalist Fred Pearce. Published April 20, 2010