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Eric Althoff

Eric Althoff

Eric Althoff is the entertainment, lifestyle and travel editor for The Washington Times. A native of New Jersey, Mr. Althoff studied at the University of Southern California, and he has worked in film, television and publishing in Los Angeles and New York. Prior to joining The Times in 2014, he wrote for Brides magazine, Black Belt, Pasadena Magazine, Set Decor, Hustler and elsewhere. He has spoken several times at the annual convention of the American Copy Editors Society.

To contact Mr. Althoff, send email to ealthoff@washingtontimes.com.

Articles by Eric Althoff

A vessel cruises in Glacier Bay National Park in Alaska.  (Eric Althoff/The Washington Times)

Encounters with the rivers of ice in Glacier Bay, Alaska

The Inside Passage is, arguably, Alaska's crown jewel. For in the southeast of the Last Frontier, the evidence of glacial carving and manipulating of the Alaskan landscape is most in evidence, with the 500 miles of waterway between the entrance at Ketchican and its abrupt terminus at Glacier Bay National Park -- a declaration of the slow yet inexorable flow of the forces of nature. Published September 25, 2017

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan said removing the Taney statue was "the right thing to do." (Associated Press/File)

Hogan: Fox 5 relocation to Maryland will boost state's economy

The District's Fox affiliate, WTTG, and WDCA Fox 5 Plus have entered into a letter of intent with Carr Properties to relocate their television facilities and operations from the Friendship Heights section of the capital to 7272 Wisconsin Ave. in Bethesda, Maryland -- a distance of less than 2 miles -- by 2021. Published September 24, 2017

This image released by Fox Searchlight Pictures shows Emma Stone, left, and Steve Carell in a scene from "Battle of the Sexes." (Melinda Sue Gordon/Fox Searchlight Pictures via AP)

'Battle of the Sexes' actors discuss iconic matchup between King and Riggs

Some 90 million people worldwide tuned in May 13, 1973, to watch 29-year-old Billie Jean King accept a challenge from 55-year-old Bobby Riggs, the loudmouth former men's champ who claimed he could beat any woman in a tennis match -- even the best one. The story of that fateful contest is recreated in the new film "Battle of the Sexes," starring Oscar-winner Emma Stone as Ms. King and Steve Carell as the conceited, self-aggrandizing Riggs. Published September 21, 2017

In this Sept. 10, 2017 photo, Jake Gyllenhaal, left, poses for portrait with Boston Marathon bombing survivor Jeff Bauman during the Toronto International Film Festival in Toronto. Gyllenhaal portrays Bauman in the film "Stronger." (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)

Boston stronger: Subject and actor discuss film based on bombing aftermath

"There was a huge responsibility in trying to get his journey right, and by right I mean what he went through emotionally, physically, sort of recalibrating his entire life after the event," the actor Jake Gyllenhaal said of portraying Jeff Bauman in "Stronger," the film adaptation of Mr. Bauman's book that comes out Friday in the capital. Published September 21, 2017

Kelli O'Hara.  (Laura Marie Duncan)

Broadway star O'Hara to headline ARTS by George! fundraiser for arts education in D.C.

To support and encourage students to study the arts, George Mason University's College of Visual and Performing Arts (CVPA) will host its 12th annual ARTS by George! Saturday at the school's Fairfax, Virginia, campus. Broadway star Kelli O'Hara will perform songs from her Great White Way career as part of the event. Published September 20, 2017

(Rit-Carlton)

Putting on the Ritz at Quadrant cocktail bar in Northwest

At Quadrant there's now a cocktail for every president, from the whiskey-producing Virginian George Washington right on up to the notorious teetotaler currently occupying 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Published September 20, 2017

(YouTube)

Lost Distillery produces scotch of impressive complexity

In the southwest Scottish town of Cumnock sits a business that calls itself the Lost Distillery, whose website claims they aim to "rescue" from the dustbin of history even just some of the many, many whisky recipes that have been lost to time as Scotland distilleries inevitably turn over, go out or business or simply stop producing. Published September 20, 2017

Karen Allen in a scene from "Year by the Sea."  (Los Angeles Times)

'Year by the Sea' star Allen recalls starting out in D.C. theaters

The actress Karen Allen is no stranger to the nation's capital. She studied at George Washington and lived in Dupont Circle while trying her hand on the District's numerous professional theaters as an aspiring actor. She found a plum role in "Year by the Sea," a new film based on the writings of Joan Anderson that bows in the District this weekend. Published September 20, 2017

(National Geographic)

National Geographic 'Sharks' exhibit highlights underwater photographer's work

The exhibit "Sharks," at the District's National Geographic Museum through Oct. 1, offers a panoply of Brian Skerry's incredible photos and even underwater video of these most magnificent creatures, who predate even the dinosaurs and have changed little since those prehistoric times. Published September 19, 2017

Spirit guide: Craft-distilled offerings to seek out this autumn

More distillers than ever before are trying their hand at craft whiskeys, vodkas and other spirits, which is great as you too can drink "hyper-locally" thanks to new products being concocted everywhere from Florida to, incredibly, Alaska. When next you're at the liquor store, bypass the big brands in favor of some craft spirits, such as the ones highlighted here. Published September 18, 2017

(Twitter)

New tunes from artists established and on the brink to usher in the fall

Fall is a magical time of year -- to fall in love, to contemplate the accomplishments and mistakes of the summer, to set new goals. The changing of the leaves and the falling temperatures cannot help but make one contemplative this time of year, and self-inquiry always could use a decent soundtrack. Fortunately, we have the goods to fire up as the seasons change, from artists new and up-and-coming, angry and calming, surprising and even more surprising. Published September 14, 2017

Nicholas Hoult portrays J.D. Salinger in a scene from "Rebel in the Rye."  (Fandango)

Mercurial 'Catcher' author explored in new film 'Rebel in the Rye'

We all had to read the book, but almost no one knows the story behind "The Catcher in the Rye." The new film "Rebel in the Rye" begins with Salinger (Nicholas Hoult) carousing about in New York's nightlife by dark and, by day, studying at Columbia under the tutelage of a professor (Kevin Spacey), who encourages his young student to find his writer's voice. Salinger enlists when the U.S. enters World War II, and it is these experiences that will haunt his writing on "Catcher in the Rye" when he returns stateside. Published September 13, 2017

Chuck D (left) and B Real of Prophets of Rage.  (NJ.com)

All the Rage: Prophets member B Real on new CD and keeping people woke in age of Trump

The election didn't go the way Prophets of Rage had hoped, but thereafter, band member B Real says, the work has continued. The Prophets, who are releasing a new self-titled album Friday, will perform at the District's 9:30 Club Thursday evening. Prior to the gig B Real spoke with The Washington Times about keeping people woke. Published September 12, 2017

Jon Taffer, host of "Bar Rescue."  (Vice)

On the rocks: 'Bar Rescue' host Taffer chats upcoming sixth season of reality show

If you're a bar owner and Jon Taffer yells at you, there's a very good chance you're doing something wrong. The host of "Bar Rescue" on Spike has spent decades turning around failing watering holes, a process that not only entails refashioning the interior and exterior of the establishment itself, but typically -- and volubly -- dressing down the establishment's owner and staff with a thorough tongue-lashing. Published September 10, 2017

The Alaska Railroad stretches from Fairbanks in the north all the way to Seward, nearly 500 miles south.  (Eric Althoff/The Washington Times)

Riding Alaska's spine: From Denali to Anchorage via rail

For on the Alaska Railroad, you experience not only a level of comfort with which we are unused to in the U.S., but a luxurious experience that ranks up with the rail travels of Britannia and continental Europe. Published September 9, 2017