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Guy Taylor

Guy Taylor

Guy Taylor is the National Security Team Leader at The Washington Times, overseeing the paper's State Department, Pentagon and intelligence community coverage. He's also a frequent guest on The McLaughlin Group and C-SPAN.

His series on political, economic and security developments in Mexico won a 2012 Virginia Press Association award.

Prior to rejoining The Times in 2011, his work was supported by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting and the Fund For Investigative Journalism, and appeared in a variety publications, from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch to Salon, Reason, Prospect Magazine of London, the Daily Star of Beirut, the Jerusalem Post and the St. Petersburg Times. He's also served as an editor at World Politics Review, written for America's Quarterly and produced news videos and feature stories for Agence France-Presse.

Mr. Taylor is a graduate of Clark University. After a stint at States News Service, he spent five years at The Times from 2001 through 2006, first on the metro desk and later reporting from Iraq, Southeast Asia, Eastern Europe and Guantanamo Bay, in addition to pursuing special assignments throughout the U.S. He was part of a team of Times reporters who won a Society of Professional Journalists award for their coverage of the September 11 terrorist attacks.

He can be reached at gtaylor@washingtontimes.com.

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Articles by Guy Taylor

This May 24, 2012, file photo shows some of about 500 miles worth of coated steel pipe manufactured by Welspun Pipes, Inc., originally for the Keystone oil pipeline, stored in Little Rock, Ark. (AP Photo/Danny Johnston, File)

Council on Foreign Relations report calls for Keystone approval

Rather than pivot to Asia, U.S. policymakers should be focusing on a pivot to North America by deepening economic ties with Canada and Mexico and getting serious about swiftly approving the Keystone XL oil pipeline, according to a report released Thursday by the Council on Foreign Relations. Published October 2, 2014

FILE - In this Sept. 26, 2014 file photo, President Barack Obama speaks in the South Court Auditorium of the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex in Washington. By President Barack Obama’s own admission, the U.S. bombing campaign against militants in Syria could help President Bashar Assad cling to power. Critics say Obama’s strategy does little to address the conditions that have allowed the Islamic State group to thrive and could leave Syria a hotbed for extremism.  (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

U.S. intel disputes Obama claim on Islamic State

U.S. policy leaders, including President Obama, were repeatedly warned for more than a year by the U.S. intelligence community that the Islamic State terror group was gaining significant strength in Syria and was on the verge of seizing territory deep inside Iraq, where the military was struggling to respond. Published September 29, 2014

Despite the Obama administration's  lacking a clear strategy for North Korea, Seoul Mayor Park Won-Soon hopes the U.S. can steer Pyongyang to openness. (Keith Lane/Special to the Washington Times)

Likely next Korean president presses Obama on Pyongyang nukes

Seoul Mayor Park Won-soon, whom polls suggest will someday become South Korea's president, says the Obama administration has been too passive in dealing with North Korea, leaving the region without a clear strategy for steering the pariah nation away from making nuclear weapons. Published September 25, 2014

President Obama, flanked by Secretary of State John Kerry and National Security Adviser Susan Rice, speaks  during his meeting with the representatives of Bahrain, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Jordan, United Arab Emirates and Iraq in New York, Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2014. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Feds name 11 backers of terrorist organizations

Bolstering the growing air and ground assault against Islamic State and al Qaeda operatives in Syria and Iraq, the Obama administration named 11 new global terrorism suspects Wednesday, claiming that each has played a role in helping to finance and provide foreign fighters for the extremist movements in the Middle East. Published September 24, 2014

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, right, shakes hands with United Arab Emirates Foreign Minister Abdullah bin Zayed before a meeting, Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2014, in New York. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)

Fears grow that Obama has 'paper coalition' in Arab world

The coalition of Arab nations that joined the U.S.-led air campaign in Syria signaled a new war on terror phase in which the Sunni Muslim-led states of the region are showing unprecedented willingness to take on Sunni Muslim extremists in their midst. Published September 23, 2014

In this photo released by the U.S. Navy, the guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea launches a Tomahawk cruise missile at Islamic State group positions in Syria as seen from the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush on the Arabian Gulf on Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2014. Syria said Tuesday that Washington informed President Bashar Assad's government of imminent U.S. airstrikes against the Islamic State group, hours before an American-led military coalition pounded the extremists' strongholds across northern and eastern Syria.(AP Photo/Eric Garst, U.S. Navy)

U.S. conducted secret strike in Syria away from Arab allied support

While a coalition of U.S. and Arab military forces struck at Islamic State targets inside Syria on Monday night, the Pentagon also engaged in a U.S.-exclusive action targeting a little-known al Qaeda-aligned group that U.S. officials say is plotting an "imminent attack" against the United States. Published September 23, 2014

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry opens a meeting on Iraq at the U.N. Security Council, Friday, Sept. 19, 2014.  (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

Kerry touts coalition for Islamic State fight, says 'We'll see what happens' with Turkey

Secretary of State John F. Kerry says there is a role for nearly every nation in the world — including Iran — in the fight against Islamic State militants in Syria and Iraq, asserting that so far "more than 50 countries have come forward with critical commitments" to a growing international effort to crush the extremist movement. Published September 19, 2014

FILE - In this Tuesday, July 22, 2014, file photo, a sign is posted at a checkpoint belonging to the Islamic State group, captured from the Iraqi Army, at the main entrance of Rawah, 175 miles (281 kilometers) northwest of Baghdad, Iraq. Arabic reads, "Islamic State, the Emirate of Anbar, City of Rawah." The U.S. and its allies are trying to hammer out a coalition to push back the Islamic State group in Iraq. But any serious attempt to destroy the militants or even seriously degrade their capabilities means targeting their infrastructure in Syria. That, however, is far more complicated. If it launches airstrikes against the group in Syria, the U.S. runs the risk of unintentionally strengthening the hand of President Bashar Assad, whose removal the West has actively sought the past three years. Uprooting the Islamic State, which has seized swaths of territory in both Syria and Iraq, would potentially open the way for the Syrian army to fill the vacuum. (AP Photo, File)

Seeking war powers, Obama now ties Islamic State to al Qaeda

President Obama for years insisted that the new breed of "local" extremists in the Middle East weren't really part of al Qaeda, but now claims the Islamic State group is indeed the same as Osama bin Laden's original network — a rhetorical shift used by the White House to justify its widening war on terrorism without explicit authorization from Congress. Published September 18, 2014

In this Friday, Sept. 12, 2014 photo, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry reacts as he listens to his Turkish counterpart Mevlut Cavusoglu in Ankara, Turkey. Kerry is in Ankara to press Turkey to join an international coalition against the Islamic State. (AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici)

Kerry to Senate: No ground troops against Islamic State

A day after his counterparts at the Pentagon said U.S. ground troops may be needed in the future to defeat Islamic State extremists in Syria and Iraq, Secretary of State John F. Kerry asserted outright Wednesday that "U.S. ground troops will not be sent into combat in this conflict." Published September 17, 2014

** FILE ** U.S. Pacific Command's Adm. Samuel J. Locklear III, talks to the media following a session on "Security Outlook" in the ongoing World Economic Forum on East Asia Friday, May 23, 2014, at the financial district of Makati city east of Manila, Philippines. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

Top U.S. admiral slams China, accuses Beijing of creating instability

The top admiral in charge of U.S. military operations in Asia lambasted China this week, accusing Chinese leaders of actively fomenting instability in the South and East China seas instead of using their expanding economic and military power to create sustainable security in the region. Published August 29, 2014

Hamas supporters gather for a rally in Gaza City, Gaza Strip. Evidence has pointed to Iran continuing to funnel weapons to the Palestinian side of the conflict with Israel. (Associated Press)

Despite sanctions relief, Iran aids Hamas with missile technology

When President Obama announced last year the easing of U.S. sanctions on Iran in return for concessions on its nuclear program, he cautiously hailed the deal as a "real opportunity to achieve a comprehensive, peaceful settlement" with Tehran. But while both countries work overtime on thorny nuclear issues, fresh evidence suggests Iran continues to support the Palestinian terrorist organization Hamas, which went to war anew this summer with Israel. Published August 18, 2014

Displaced Iraqis from the Yazidi community gather at a park near the Turkey-Iraq border at the Ibrahim al-Khalil crossing, as they try to cross to Turkey, in Zakho, 300 miles (475 kilometers) northwest of Baghdad, Iraq, Friday, Aug. 15, 2014. The European Union on Friday forged a unified response to the rapid advance of Islamic militants in Iraq and the resulting refugee crisis, allowing direct arms deliveries to Kurdish fighters battling the Sunni insurgents, while several EU nations pledged more humanitarian aid. (AP Photo/Khalid Mohammed)

Kurdish diplomat debunks Yazidi claims of exploitation

The top Kurdish diplomat in Washington pushed back assertively Friday against comments this week by a group of Yazidi-Americans, who had expressed fears about a growing U.S. and European strategy to channel Western military hardware to Kurdish militias in the fight against Islamic State extremists in northern Iraq. Published August 15, 2014