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Jessica Chasmar

Jessica Chasmar

Jessica Chasmar is a continuous news writer for The Washington Times, covering topics on culture and politics. Originally from Palm Beach Gardens, Fla., Jessica graduated from the University of Florida where she received a bachelor's degree in journalism and a master's degree in mass communication.

During her time at University of Florida, she worked as an associate editor for The Gainesville Sun and interned at Entercom Communications. In 2011, she was part of the start-up team for The Washington Times' digital aggregation product, Times247. She can be reached at jchasmar@washingtontimes.com.

Articles by Jessica Chasmar

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan walks outside his office in Ankara, Turkey, Thursday, April 17, 2014. Turkey's parliament looks set to pass a bill that increases the powers and immunities of the country's spy agency. It is the latest in a string of moves critics say is undermining democracy in the country that is a candidate to join the European Union. The bill, expected to be voted on Thursday, gives the National Intelligence Agency greater eavesdropping and operational powers and increases its immunities and abilities to keep tabs on citizens. Journalists publishing classified documents would face prison terms. (AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici)

Twitter blocks accounts critical of Turkish government

Twitter appears to have blocked two anonymous accounts that were used to release secretly recorded conversations implicating Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan and senior government officials in a damning corruption scandal. Published April 20, 2014

NYT's David Brooks: Obama has 'manhood problem' in Middle East

New York Times columnist David Brooks said Sunday that he believes President Obama's foreign policy isn't "tough enough" and that he has a "manhood problem" when it comes to dealing with leaders such as Russian President Vladimir Putin and Syrian President Bashar Assad. Published April 20, 2014

** FILE ** Sen. Ted Cruz addresses the crowd at the Marine Military Academy in Harlingen, Texas, Thursday, April 17, 2014. (AP Photo/Valley Morning Star/David Pike)

Ted Cruz thanks Obama for denying visas to terrorists

Sen. Ted Cruz wrote President Obama a thank you letter in this week's Politico magazine for the president's support behind S. 2195, which gives him the authority to deny visas to United Nations ambassadors who are known terrorists. Published April 20, 2014

Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk speaks to lawmakers during a session at the Ukrainian parliament in Kiev, Ukraine, Friday, April 18, 2014. Pro-Russian insurgents in Ukraine's east who have been occupying government buildings in more than 10 cities said Friday they will only leave them if the interim government in Kiev resigns. (AP Photo/Sergei Chuzavkov)

Ukraine PM vows to find 'bastards' behind anti-Semitic fliers

Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk said Sunday that he has ordered his forces to find and bring to justice those responsible for handing out leaflets ordering Jews to register in the eastern city of Donetsk. Published April 20, 2014

A Star of David, often yellow-colored, was used by the Nazis during the Holocaust as a method of identifying Jews.

Jews being told to register in Ukraine: John Kerry

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said Thursday that Jews in the Ukrainian city of Donetsk were recently were given notices instructing them to officially identify themselves as Jews. Published April 17, 2014

FILE - In this Jan. 23, 2009 file photo, Henrique de Castro, Google's then Managing Director Media Solutions, speaks during a news conference at the Vatican's press room. Yahoo on Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2014 announced that CEO Marissa Mayer is cutting loose de Castro, Yahoo's chief operating officer, a possible sign that the Internet company's efforts to revive its long-slumping advertising sales aren't paying off.(AP Photo/Riccarco De Luca, File)

Fired Yahoo exec's $60 million golden parachute may be a record

The Yahoo chief operating officer who was ousted this week after only 15 months is taking home an estimated $60 million in severance, one of the largest golden parachutes ever given to an executive who was fired, according to a CNN report. Published April 17, 2014

Stephen Arthuro Solis-Reyes, 19, of London, Ont., has been charged for allegedly using the Heartbleed Internet bug to hack into the country's tax agency, forcing it to delay its tax-filing deadline. (CBC News/2011-12 Mother Teresa Catholic secondary school yearbook)

Canadian teen arrested in Heartbleed hack attack

A 19-year-old Canadian student at Western University has been charged with using the Heartbleed Internet bug to hack into the country's tax agency, forcing it to delay its tax-filing deadline. Published April 17, 2014