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Maggie Ybarra

Maggie Ybarra

Maggie Ybarra is military affairs and Pentagon correspondent for The Washington Times. She can be reached at mybarra@washingtontimes.com.

Articles by Maggie Ybarra

This image provided by the U.S. Defense Department shows pallets of bottled water are loaded aboard a U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III aircraft in preparation for a humanitarian airdrop over Iraq Aug. 8, 2014. Airmen with the 816th Expeditionary Airlift Squadron airdropped 40 bundles of water for displaced citizens in the vicinity of Sinjar, Iraq. American planes conducted a second airdrop of food and water early Saturday for those trapped in the Sinjar mountains, said Pentagon chief spokesman Rear Adm. John Kirby. (AP Photo/U.S. Air Force, Staff Sgt. Vernon Young Jr.)

Pentagon: Rescue mission to Sinjar Mountain 'less likely'

Defense Department officials say a mission to rescue thousands of refugees atop Iraq's Sinjar Mountain is unlikely after a team of U.S. Army Green Berets surveyed the situation in the last day and found fewer refugees and better conditions than had been expected. Published August 13, 2014

FILE - In this Wednesday, June 25, 2014 file photo, Kurdish peshmerga fighters take positions on the front line with militants from the al-Qaida-inspired Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), in Tuz Khormato, 100 kilometers (62 miles) south of the oil rich province of Kirkuk, northern Iraq. The Kurdish forces trying to protect this northern Iraqi town have felt the brunt of Islamic extremist fighters’ attacks and know how ferocious it is. The militants are bristling with American weapons and armored Humvees looted from Iraqi arsenals, giving them a powerful edge. After Washington’s promises to arm them, the Kurds say they badly need heavier weapons from the United States to stem the expansion of the Islamic State group. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla, File)

Pentagon planning for weapons delivery to Kurdish fighters

The Pentagon is looking to join U.S. allies in delivering weapons supplies to Kurdish fighters who are battling back a violent, Islamic militant group persecuting religious minorities in northern Iraq. Published August 13, 2014

Displaced Iraqis from the Yazidi community settle near the holy Lalish temple in the Mountains of Shikhan near Dahuk, 260 miles (430 kilometers) northwest of Baghdad Monday, Aug. 11, 2014. President Barack Obama authorized the airstrikes to protect U.S. interests and personnel in the region, including at facilities in Irbil, as well as Yazidi refugees fleeing militants. (AP Photo/ Khalid Mohammed)

130 advisers sent to northern Iraq to help fight Islamists

The Obama Administration sent about 130 advisers to northern Iraq on Tuesday in preparation for expanding a humanitarian mission to assist the Yazidi, a religious minority fleeing a vicious and war-savvy Islamist militant group. Published August 12, 2014

Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki.  (AP Photo, Hadi Mizban, File)

Al-Maliki accuses Iraq president of 'coup'

Further destabilization rocked Iraq on Sunday as Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki accused President Fouad Massoum of engaging in a "coup" by failing to choose a new prime minister by an Sunday's deadline. Published August 10, 2014

An F/A-18C Hornet takes off for Iraq from the flight deck of the U.S. Navy aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush on Sunday, Aug. 10, 2014 in the Persian Gulf. Aircrafts aboard the George H.W. Bush are flying missions over Iraq after U.S. President Barack Obama authorized airstrikes against Islamic militants and food drops for Iraqis trapped by the fighters. (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali)

U.S. airstrikes help Iraqi Kurds reclaim land from Islamic State militants

Kurdish forces backed by U.S. airstrikes succeeded Sunday in expelling Islamic State fighters from two northern Iraqi towns, but the developments did little to appease Obama administration critics who say the White House lacks a coherent long-term strategy for beating back the growing al Qaeda-inspired militancy in the war-torn nation. Published August 10, 2014

F-15 STRIKE EAGLE. File photo.

Obama authorizes airstrikes in Iraq against Islamic State

President Obama authorized airstrikes against Islamist terrorists in Iraq and approved a humanitarian mission to deliver food and other supplies to tens of thousands of Iraqis trapped on mountaintops, moves that represent the most significant re-engagement in Iraq since formal combat operations ended three years ago. Published August 7, 2014

** FILE **  AC-130A Spectre gunship. (Wikimedia Commons)

U.S. begins airdrops to trapped Iraqis: reports

The U.S. has begun a humanitarian mission to deliver supplies to tens of thousands of Iraqis trapped on a mountaintop by Islamist terrorists, Pentagon officials said Thursday night. Published August 7, 2014

Maj. Gen. Harold Greene       U.S.Army photo

General is U.S. military's highest-ranking fatality in Afghanistan war

A general became the U.S. military's highest-ranking fatality in the war in Afghanistan on Tuesday when an Afghan soldier opened fire at a military training academy west of the capital, Kabul — a bloody reminder of the insider attacks that have been decreasing as international troops prepare to leave the country by the end of the year. Published August 5, 2014

Bergdahl

Bergdahl questioning set for Wednesday

Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl will meet Wednesday with the two-star general who is overseeing an investigation into his disappearance from a combat outpost in 2009, according to his attorney. Published August 4, 2014

A Ukrainian government army soldier rests on his tank at a block-post in the village of Debaltseve, eastern Ukraine Friday, Aug. 1, 2014. With the sound of artillery blasts at a distance, dozens of international investigators arrived Friday at the eastern Ukraine site where Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashed and began a painstaking search for the remains of as many as 80 victims. (AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky)

Pentagon wants extra $19M to equip, train Ukrainian troops

The Pentagon has notified Congress of a plan to increase the amount of money that it is spending on bolstering the defense capabilities of the Ukrainian military, with the majority of that funding going toward equipping and training national guard troops to conduct various missions. Published August 1, 2014

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, accompanied by Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Martin Dempsey, briefs reporters at the Pentagon, Monday, Feb. 24, 2014, where he recommended shrinking the Army to its smallest size since the buildup to U.S. involvement in World War II in an effort to balance postwar defense needs with budget realities. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Additional Army cuts rattle Pentagon

The Army plans to notify about 500 majors over the next month that they must leave the military service as part of a eye-popping Pentagon plan to shrink number of active-duty soldiers from about 513,000 to 490,000 by 2015. Published August 1, 2014

Obama: 'Not a new Cold War,' but new Russia sanctions announced

President Obama announced a new round of U.S. sanctions against Russian banks and a shipbuilding company Tuesday, saying Russia must pay an increasingly high price for its military aggression in Ukraine and the downing of a passenger jet. Published July 29, 2014

Afghan special forces hold their weapons after a gunbattle with insurgents near the Afghan parliament in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Monday, April 16, 2012. (AP Photo/Ahmad Jamshid)

Report: 40% of weapons sent to Afghanistan are unaccounted for

A government oversight agency says the Pentagon has lost track of more than 40 percent of the firearms it has provided to Afghanistan's security forces, prompting officials to contemplate a "carrot and stick" approach to arming the fledgling military. Published July 27, 2014