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Patrice Hill

Patrice Hill

Patrice Hill has been chief economics correspondent at The Washington Times since 1994. She previously was a Washington correspondent for the Daily Bond Buyer and worked for Securities Week and Inside E.P.A. She started her career writing a consumer action column carried by the Riverside Press-Enterprise, Baltimore Sun, Chicago Tribune and other newspapers.

Her feature stories showing how the average guy is affected by significant economic trends have earned more than a dozen awards from the Maryland-D.C. Press Association, the Chesapeake-AP Press Association, the Virginia Press Association and the Society for Professional Journalists. She is a graduate of Oberlin College.

She can be reached at phill@washingtontimes.com.

Articles by Patrice Hill

Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a meeting with local officials in Voronezh, Russia, Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014. Putin says he has ordered the government to develop measures in response to Western sanctions. In a meeting with state officials in the city of Voronezh on Tuesday, did not specify what the measures might be but said: "I have given the order today to formulate them," Russian news agencies reported. (AP Photo/RIA-Novosti,  Alexei Druzhinin, Presidential Press Service)

Oil giants sidestep sanctions, keep drilling with Russia

The West's major oil companies have been seamlessly sidestepping sanctions imposed on Russia by the U.S. and European Union, for the most part pressing full speed ahead on joint ventures to drill for oil and gas with sanctioned Russian companies and executives. Published August 11, 2014

Pros and cons: "Mainland China is our largest land of opportunities, but they are the largest single, potential source of threat for us," says Shen Lyu-shun, Taiwan's top representative to the U.S. (Lloyd Villas/The Washington Times)

Taiwan's top diplomat seeks U.S. help in emerging from China's shadow

NEWSMAKER INTERVIEW: The top Taiwanese diplomat in Washington made a passionate plea Monday for U.S. leaders to more vocally support Taiwan's inclusion in key Western-backed institutions on the world stage — especially as the tiny island democracy engages in increasingly complex economic ties with China. Published August 11, 2014

Leaders of the BRICS nations pose for a group photo during the summit in Fortaleza, Brazil, in July. From left: Russian President Vladimir Putin, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff, Chinese President Xi Jinping and South African President Jacob Zuma. The leaders of the BRICS nations are expected to officially create a bailout and development fund worth $100 billion. (Associated Press)

Emerging economic powers to challenge U.S., IMF with own aid bank

With Congress balking at reform legislation giving large, emerging economic powers a greater say in the International Monetary Fund, some of the world's top rising economies have decided to establish their own aid bank to compete with the Western-led IMF for clients in the developing world. Published August 5, 2014

An unexpectedly strong report on manufacturing activity Monday bolstered confidence that the nation's factories will help sustain an economic recovery.

Economy springs back in nearly every sector

The U.S. economy snapped back this spring from a winter down spell, growing at a robust 4 percent annual rate in the second quarter, the Commerce Department reported Wednesday. Published July 30, 2014

New Jersey state troopers kept order as motorists and pedestrians waited in long lines to purchase gasoline in the paucity following Superstorm Sandy. The storm's fallout highlighted the need for increased domestic oil reserves. (associated press)

Energy Department eyes regional gas reserves for emergency use

In another presidential foray into territory once reserved for Congress, President Obama's Department of Energy is exploring setting up sites to store reserves of gasoline in various places around the country to provide backup when major storms and other emergencies cut off access to local fuel supplies. Published July 27, 2014

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen speaks at the International Monetary Fund in Washington, Wednesday, July 2, 2014.  Yellen said she doesn't see a need for the Fed to start raising interest rates to address the risk that extremely low rates could destabilize the financial system.  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Economists see signs of another market bubble

Could the Federal Reserve's loose-money policies be fueling another financial market bubble like the one whose abrupt and painful end ushered in the last recession? Published July 13, 2014

Signs like this one in Bradshaw, Nebraska, express local resistance to the Keystone XL pipeline from Canada to the U.S. Gulf Coast, which would run through Bradshaw. (associated press)

Crude oil will head north of the border to Canada

While Congress and the White House have been fighting over whether to build the Keystone XL pipeline so the U.S. can import more oil from Canada, U.S. energy companies have quietly turned that debate on its head and are now exporting growing amounts of oil to Canada. Published July 9, 2014

The future of the Ex-Im Bank, which many conservatives condemn as "corporate welfare" to well-heeled U.S. exporters, was put in doubt when Rep. Kevin McCarthy, the California Republican and the incoming majority leader for the House GOP caucus, said Sunday he opposes a reauthorization vote. The White House has expressed strong support for reauthorization, with press secretary Josh Earnest going so far as to invoke former President Ronald Reagan's support of the bank in an effort to sway Mr. McCarthy. (Associated Press)

S&P: Boeing to suffer if Ex-Im Bank killed

A campaign by congressional Republicans to eliminate the U.S. Export-Import Bank clouds the outlook for America's premier exporter, Boeing Co., Standard & Poor's Corp. warned on Tuesday. Published July 8, 2014

FILE - In this Friday, March 21, 2014, file photo, snow partially covers the ground where a single family housing construction is underway in North Andover, Mass. Craig Alexander, chief economist at TD Bank, estimates that the brutal winter slowed economic activity by about 1.5 percentage points on an annual basis. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)

Winter wipeout: Economy shrank 2.9 percent in first quarter

The latest report from the Commerce Department revealed a shocking 2.9 percent drop in economic output during the winter quarter that amounted to the biggest loss of economic traction since the first quarter of 2009, when the economy and financial markets were in free fall. Published June 25, 2014

A column of smoke rises from an oil refinery in Baiji, 155 miles north of Baghdad, on Thursday. Sunni Muslim extremists who have taken over large portions of northern Iraq have shown their willingness to use oil supplies as a weapon. (Associated Press)

U.S. oil flow helps keep prices in check as threats rise overseas

America's growing energy independence is paying major dividends this spring, helping to keep a lid on fuel prices despite sudden threats to major global oil supplies in Iraq and Russia that in the past would have sent prices soaring. Published June 19, 2014

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen speaks during a news conference at the Federal Reserve in Washington, Wednesday, June 18, 2014. The Federal Reserve has sharply cut its forecast for U.S. growth this year, reflecting a shrinking economy last quarter caused mostly by harsh weather. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Federal Reserve sees stronger growth in second half

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen was upbeat Wednesday about the prospects for stronger growth in the 3 percent range in the second half of the year after the economy took a rare dip in the first quarter. Published June 18, 2014

One of the email addresses of EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy apparently has been scrubbed. (Associated Press)

Coal-mining jobs 'in free-fall' after EPA regs

The nation's coal mines are closing down so rapidly in the wake of a raft of federal environmental regulations targeting coal that mining employment is now in a "free fall," according to a new report from a leading industry research firm. Published June 12, 2014

The Plant Vogtle nuclear power plant is shown under construction in Augusta, Georgia in 2012. One of the existing reactors is shown in the background. (Associated Press)

Nuclear industry sees revival with carbon goals

The Obama administration's proposed regulations for power plants would give a big boost to nuclear power as the industry faces an uncertain future with increasing retirements and declining prospects for dozens of aging reactors. Published June 8, 2014

FILE - In this Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013, file photo, Luis Mendez, 23, left, and Maurice Mike, 23, wait in line at a job fair held by the Miami Marlins, at Marlins Park in Miami. Employers added a scant 74,000 jobs in December after averaging 214,000 in the previous four months. The Labor Department said Friday, Jan. 10, 2014, that the unemployment rate fell from 7 percent in November to 6.7 percent, its lowest level since October 2008. But the drop occurred mostly because many Americans stopped looking for jobs. Once people without jobs stop looking for one, the government no longer counts them as unemployed. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)

May job gains put U.S. over peak set in January 2008

A gain of 217,000 jobs last month sent U.S. total employment past its previous peak of 138.4 million, set in January 2008 just after the Great Recession began, the Labor Department reported Friday. Published June 8, 2014

A job hunter fills out an employment application at the Fort Lauderdale Career Fair in Dania Beach, Fla., on Friday, Nov. 30, 2012. The U.S. economy added a solid 146,000 jobs in November, and the unemployment rate fell to 7.7 percent, the lowest since December 2008, the Labor Department announced. (AP Photo/J Pat Carter)

U.S. surpassed pre-recession peak in jobs in May

A gain of 217,000 jobs last month sent U.S. total employment past its previous peak of 138.4 million, set in January 2008 just after the Great Recession began, the Labor Department reported Friday. Published June 6, 2014