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R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr.

R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr.

R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr. is the founder and editor in chief of The American Spectator and a New York Times best-selling author. He makes frequent appearances on national television and is a nationally syndicated columnist, whose articles have appeared in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Baltimore Sun, The Washington Times, National Review, Harper's, Commentary, The (London) Spectator, Le Figaro (Paris) and elsewhere.

Articles by R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr.

Illustration on Hillary's newest book by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

'Hillary, here is what happened'

What did I tell you? Late in November of last year, after the presidential election that finally ended the Clintons' 24-year pursuit of power in Washington and their diminishment of the Democratic Party, I wrote that the Clintons were finished. I had consulted my sources. What is more, I reported that on election night Hillary had a "meltdown." That is why she never showed up to thank her supporters who were milling around New York City's Javits Center all night. Few others in the media reported it. Yet now I have still more evidence, provided by Hillary herself. Published September 19, 2017

Illustration on the politicization of Hurricane Irma by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The anger of the hurricane media

Here we sit in the comfort of Washington and we read of the discomfort in Florida. There a massive storm moved from the Caribbean north through South Florida, displacing as many as 5 million people. Published September 12, 2017

Illustration on thoughts about FDR over Labor Day weekend by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

With Roosevelt on Labor Day

Labor Day weekend passed with soggy weather in Washington. It was not as soggy as in other parts of the United States, but it kept me indoors most of the time, and so I decided to give some thought to the one American president whom I associate with Labor Day, Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Actually to be historically correct, I should associate President Grover Cleveland -- a conservative Democrat -- with Labor Day, for he was the first to make it a national holiday. Yet for some reason it is associated with FDR, at least in my mind. Published September 5, 2017

Trump's Baloney Detector Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Donald Trump's baloney detector annoys his critics

President Trump is in trouble again with his moral superiors. His problem, of course, is that he cannot throttle his baloney detector. Mr. Trump, it seems, at some point in life acquired a baloney detector that has usually served him well. It certainly served him well during his long years in business and during his brief time in politics. Now, however, it is problematic. Published August 22, 2017

Illustration on CNN and "the moron vote" by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Controversy at a pious cable news outlet

Last week CNN fired Jeffrey Lord, its famously pro-Trump contributor, for mocking an activist whom The Daily Caller has reported as a racist and an anti-Semite. Mr. Lord addressed him with the salutation, "Sieg Heil!" What is wrong with that? Is CNN covering for racists and anti-Semites? Published August 15, 2017

Illustration on Hillary and the resist movement      The Washington Times

Fifty years of 'resistance'

I have experienced defeat in presidential politics many times. Actually, I expect most Americans have. You win some and you lose some. Published August 8, 2017

In this July 21, 2017 photo, incoming White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci, right, blowing a kiss after answering questions during the press briefing in the Brady Press Briefing room of the White House in Washington. Scaramucci is out as White House communications director after just 11 days on the job.  A person close to Scaramucci confirmed the staffing change just hours after President Donald Trumps new chief of staff, John Kelly, was sworn into office. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Removing the 'Scar'

Luigi Barzini, my old pal and the author of so many fine books all written from his aerie above Rome -- and his finest, "The Italians," he wrote in English -- once jolted me by saying, "You Americans talk too much." Of course, he said it with affection. Back in the days of the Cold War, he was one of the few European intellectuals who really understood and admired America. What provoked him, however, was the famous euphemism of American politicians. Published August 1, 2017

Rob Goldstone About to Get Busted Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Who is colluding with whom?

In the Russia-Trump imbroglio let us be clear. We are now months into it. A dozen or so culprits have been fingered, some being actually quite amusing. You will be seeing more of the fat British music promoter, Rob Goldstone, who has been photographed wearing a baseball hat emblazoned with a word denoting a type of female anatomy on it. Published July 25, 2017

Left Wing University Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When institutions drift left

I have recently been reminded of one of my earliest conclusions about the American left. I arrived at that conclusion when what we now call the left was relatively civilized. We called it, in those days, American liberalism, but even then it was fla fla. Published July 18, 2017

Illustration on the new "Resistance" by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The American left's downward spiral

I have returned. From Europe, that is, and I hope I met with no Russian undercover agents while there. The soi-disant liberals are in a snit about the Russians. Supposedly, Donald Trump Jr. and the mysterious Jared Kushner met with an undercover agent of the Kremlin in June of last year, and they did not report their meeting to The Powers That Be. Published July 11, 2017

Illustration on dealing with the rise of violent Shariaists in the U.S. after the demise of the ISIS caliphate by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Fending off ISIS and Shariah

Do I detect a note of desperation in how some of my fellow Americans discuss how to treat terrorism, specifically the Islamic State, or ISIS? ISIS has grown from a small group of brutes back in President Obama's time committing various heinous crimes into a small army consisting of a few thousand, perhaps tens of thousands committing heinous crimes. Published June 27, 2017

Square Peg in a Round Hole Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Just another well-intentioned progressive

Have you followed the drift of the Mainstream Media (MSM) as to what provoked James T. Hodgkinson to attempt the massacre of the Republican baseball team as it practiced in Alexandria, Va., last week? Published June 20, 2017

Illustration of James Comey by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

James Comey, the crack-up

I shall not beat around the bush. As readers of this column perhaps suspect, I have admired former FBI Director James Comey for most of his public career, beginning in 2013. That he is a friend of former FBI Director Robert Mueller makes me admire him even more. Mr. Mueller is a man of integrity and discretion. Mr. Mueller would not befriend a man of dubious character. Published June 13, 2017

Illustration on the passing relevancy of the Clintons by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Meyer Lansky's advice to the Clintons

I shall be honest with you. Let me be frank. I am worried about the Clintons. They are that magical couple about whom most of Washington's commentariat have been in agreement ever since John F. Harris wrote his definitive book, "The Survivor." Published June 6, 2017

Memorial Day Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

What words cannot convey on Memorial Day

Last weekend I heard, while visiting the New Jersey shore, an astonishing number of vacationing Americans -- all well-intentioned, to be sure -- greet their fellow vacationers with a cheerful: "Have a Happy Memorial Day." Published May 30, 2017

Illustration of Roger Ailes    The Washington Times

Roger Ailes' exit, stage right

A major threat to the predominance of the Kultursmog in these United States passed away last week, but he had succeeded in what he set out to do, namely: to damage the left in America beyond any hope of recovery. Not many people recognize this, but it is nonetheless true. Published May 23, 2017

Illustration on the state of leftist humor by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Chaos and the commentariat

It is probably too early in our 45th president's tenure to evaluate how his critics are appraising him, both those on the left and those on the right. Among his critics on the right, such as Bill Kristol and George F. Will, their criticisms have calmed down a bit, and of course their criticisms are relatively chaste. Published May 9, 2017

Illustration on campus radical chic by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Ann Coulter and campus outrage

Well, she did not show up. I am talking about Ann Coulter, the svelte, conservative firebrand who was invited to the University of California at Berkeley, to speak and inadvertently to show the assembled coeds how a stylish blonde dresses. But then she was disinvited. Published May 2, 2017

Illustration on the new book on Hillary's failed presidential campaign by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hillary as seen by official Washington

We call it Kultursmog, it being that collection of attitudes, ideas, tastes and personages that are polluted by the politics of the left and that predominate on both coasts. And who are we? Published April 25, 2017