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R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr.

R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr.

R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr. is the founder and editor in chief of The American Spectator and a New York Times best-selling author. He makes frequent appearances on national television and is a nationally syndicated columnist, whose articles have appeared in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Baltimore Sun, The Washington Times, National Review, Harper's, Commentary, The (London) Spectator, Le Figaro (Paris) and elsewhere.

Articles by R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr.

Obama and Palin gaffes

What would the mainstream media's response be if former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin described China's economic growth to an audience of students in Shanghai as "an accomplishment unparalleled in human history"? That is what the most inexperienced president in modern American history said in Shanghai this week. Published November 20, 2009

Anita Dunn is done

Well, that did not take long! Just weeks after initiating a war of words with Fox News and being exposed as an admirer of Chairman Mao Zedong, Anita Dunn, the White House communications director, is stepping down. I intimated as much a couple of weeks back, when I lumped her in with two other Obama administration zanies who were forced to resign: environmental czar Van Jones and National Endowment for the Arts spokesman Yosi Sergant. Published November 13, 2009

The politics of the obvious

What strikes me about politics over the last couple of years is how obvious it all has been. In 2008, as the junior senator from Illinois campaigned across the country demonstrating his gifts as a motivational speaker and community organizer, all one had to do was review his recent life to know that he was about to bring down on the country - ever so incompetently - the most left-wing government in American history. And so he has - with the utmost incompetence. Think of the paucity of swine flu vaccine, in large part the consequence of his government's meddling with production. Published November 6, 2009

Where the girls are not

These are vexed times. The country is at war on two fronts. Rogue states are edging toward acquiring strategic nuclear weaponry. We have been through a very serious recession from which we may not emerge into the bright morn of economic health for years. The dollar is frail. The future of national health care, finance and corporate governance is in doubt. Yet that is not all. Published October 30, 2009

Dangerous zanies

We are at that delicious moment in a modern Democratic presidential administration when the bizarre fantasticos who decorate each chaotic regime make their painful appearance - though this administration is bringing a whiff of the ominous. Let me explain. Published October 23, 2009

Another Clinton scandal

I have been defamed by Taylor Branch, and he will not reply to my repeated calls for clarification. The defamation takes place in his new book, "The Clinton Tapes: Wrestling History With the President." The defamation he printed comes from the Boy President himself, so perhaps my reputation will emerge immaculate. By now I think it is pretty clear to all Americans that Bill Clinton tells the truth only when he misspeaks. Published October 16, 2009

White-collar hero

If you happen to be in Manhattan on Monday, do not miss the Columbus Day Parade gliding up Fifth Avenue. It will be a gaudy, joyful affair as always, but it will feature something especially timely. Published October 9, 2009

Freedom from foreign oil

Boone Pickens likes to call it a "game changer," and the game he has in mind is a big one, the game for our global energy security. Boone is the billionaire Texas oilman who years ago warned that the price of oil will continue to go up, price plateau by price plateau - each plateau being higher and more expensive for the American consumer. Published October 2, 2009

The next advent

Was I wrong about him? I have voiced a low opinion of Newt Gingrich since the mid-1990s. It was then that I concluded that Newt was the Republican equivalent of Boy Clinton. That is to say, Newt was a 1960s narcissist of the student government variety. Published September 25, 2009

Absurdity meter overload

My absurdity meter has blown up. The current news has been simply too much for this frail device, which I attach to my television set to give me a daily reading of the news' absurdity content. Published September 18, 2009

Buchanan refights World War II

Sept. 1 was the 70th anniversary of Adolf Hitler's blitzkrieg into Poland and the beginning of World War II. Fifty million people died. Western Europe was devastated. Eastern Europe was more thoroughly devastated and subjected to communist tyranny that for decades seemed invincible and a threat to the Free World, which remained armed and vigilant. Published September 11, 2009

A carousel of incompetence

According to the Gallup Poll, the Prophet Obama's job approval is at its lowest since his coronation. It began at 70 percent. Now it is 51 percent. Equally glum, his disapproval rating has climbed from 11 percent to 42 percent. Published August 28, 2009

A prince of a fellow

It took cancer more than a year to kill Bob Novak, and actually this was the fifth cancer that tried to kill him. Let that stand as a testimonial to how tough this guy was. Published August 19, 2009

From the grisly to the frivolous

Allow me a word of encouragement to our president, Barack Obama. Mr. Obama, you are doing just fine. You wanted to set a new tone in Washington, and you have. You wanted an open debate on health care, and you have it. Admittedly, the tone is astoundingly rancorous, and not incidentally, your approval ratings continue to decline. Published August 14, 2009

The Al Franken shtick

The Minnesota Supreme Court has now ended months of vote fraud and other assorted acts of skullduggery to pronounce Al Franken winner of the state's 2008 senatorial race over Republican Norm Coleman. The process was unseemly, and it is conceivable that the court's justices merely acted out of civic pride. They did not want Minnesota's U.S. Senate races to attain the sort of notoriety attached to aldermanic elections in Chicago or presidential elections in Iran. Published July 3, 2009

TYRRELL: ACLU talks too much

It was my old friend and mentor, Luigi Barzini, who asseverated, "Americans talk too much." He was sitting in the elegant library of his home in Rome. Published May 29, 2009

TYRRELL: Evolution and fuel efficiency

This week, a 47-million-year-old fossil was put on display at New York's American Museum of Natural History. Scientists accorded the event enormous attention, as did the press. Published May 22, 2009

TYRRELL: McAuliffe's mischief

I see that my chum Terry McAuliffe will be in Virginia's June 9 Democratic primary competing for his party's gubernatorial nomination. Published May 15, 2009

TYRRELL: The snickering of liberals

Is it possible that Justice David H. Souter has sensed what I have sensed in reading the liberals' dutiful adieus to him, their judicial Benedict Arnold? They are all snickering behind their hands. Published May 8, 2009