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Oscar statue (Associated Press)

EDITORIAL: A bad night for Oscar

That's quite a hangover Oscar is still nursing, two days later. The motion picture academy tried to give him away to the wrong winners, and the academy posted a tribute to a Hollywood icon no longer with us with a photograph of someone else who is still very much with us. One of the performers was hit on the head by a prop. One thing followed another. Published February 27, 2017

Tom Perez (Associated Press)

Democrats lunge left

Keep turning left and you'll always come back to the place where you started, or a dead end. Neither result seems to bother the Democrats. The party of Jefferson chose its leader over the weekend, Tom Perez, who prescribes more of what brought the party low. Striking out toward the dead end, Democrats will need more than a wing and a prayer to survive and prosper. Published February 27, 2017

McMaster not fit for security role

The president's new national security adviser, Army Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, does not believe that radical Islam is the root cause of Islamic terrorism. Because of this I urge President Trump to discharge his latest selection to the position and replace him with former ambassador John Bolton. Published February 27, 2017

Illegals not solely to blame

While it is refreshing to see that President Trump is seeking to take the enforcement of our immigration laws seriously, it should be noted that the just and equitable enforcement of those laws requires the recognition of an important fact. Many of those who have furtively entered our nation have been encouraged to do so by the sporadic or lax enforcement of our immigration laws by previous administrations. Published February 27, 2017

Morris Dees of the Southern Poverty Law Center (Associated Press)

Selling an epidemic

Some of the shills on the left lament "an epidemic of hate out there, and it's about to drown the republic." The contagion has spread like wildfire, which stretches cliche to a breaking point, and according to the usual jeremiahs on the left it all started with Donald Trump. Published February 26, 2017

Enforcing laws not racist

In President Bill Clinton's 1995 State of the Union address he said all Americans were disturbed by the number of illegal immigrants in the country. He noted the burdens that illegals put on taxpayers and vowed to crack down aggressively. Mr. Clinton received a standing ovation for his remarks. There were few protests, if any. The media, Hollywood and Democrats were not outraged. Meryl Streep did not say the brown shirts were coming. Madonna didn't threaten to burn the White House down. The Washington Post and other reporters did not write articles every day calling Mr. Clinton a racist or saying that he wanted to break up families. Published February 26, 2017

Disliked for keeping promises

The media and others complain about our new president because he doesn't do things the way previous presidents did things. Well, that's a good thing. Published February 26, 2017

Former U.S. President Barack Obama (Associated Press)

Mon Dieu! President Obama of France

A month out of the White House, and Barack Obama is still looking for work. Fortunately, there may be a France in his future. A group of merry pranksters in Paris is circulating a petition to get him on the ballot as a candidate for president in the round of elections beginning in April. Published February 26, 2017

Keep promises of repeal

We were well-informed in 2009 of the disastrous impact Obamacare would have on the American public. Now, with the Republicans in control of the House, Senate and White House (and a more positive influence in the Supreme Court), we have a chance to fix this situation. Published February 23, 2017

What about Clintons' anti-Semitism?

There is a certain hypocrisy in Rep. Jerry Nadler and other Democrats calling upon President Trump to condemn anti-Semitism. Many of these same people failed to condemn the Rev. Jesse Jackson for his infamous remarks about Jews in 1984, as well as comments that have been made by other Democrats. These of course include Hillary Clinton, who was seen and heard screaming an anti-Semitic epithet at her husband's campaign manager following Bill Clinton's 1974 lost congressional-seat bid in Arkansas. Published February 23, 2017

Protesters hold signs during a rally in support of transgender youth, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017, at the Stonewall National Monument in New York. They were demonstrating against President Donald Trump's decision to roll back a federal rule saying public schools had to allow transgender students to use the bathrooms and locker rooms of their chosen gender identity. The rule had already been blocked from enforcement, but transgender advocates view the Trump administration action as a step back for transgender rights. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

Free-for-all at the urinal

A visitor from Mars or Pluto could reasonably conclude that Earth is a weird planet indeed. "It's a heavenly body of great beauty," he might report back to headquarters, "where everyone is trying to change his and her sex but is so squeamish about talking about sex that they must coin euphemisms, such as 'gender identity,' to describe it." Published February 23, 2017

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting on domestic and international human trafficking, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017,in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

The comeback of coal

President Trump's boisterous press conferences sometimes cast a shadow over one of his most important achievements so far: his executive order suspending runaway Environmental Protection Agency rules that all but bankrupted the American coal industry. Three of America's largest coal companies declared Chapter 11 in recent years largely as a result of rules like the Clean Power Plant Act, a gift of Barack Obama. Published February 23, 2017

Climate change, not tax, real burden

Thank you for reporting on the carbon dividends plan released by Republican elder statesmen and the Climate Leadership Council. According to the article, "Republican leaders on Capitol Hill and their anti-tax allies are moving quickly to crush conservative proposals for a carbon tax before they even have time to breathe" ("Republicans move to block conservative proposals for carbon tax," Web, Feb. 19). Published February 22, 2017

Media trying to toss Trump

The media in South Africa did the same thing to President F.W. DeKlerk that the U.S. media is doing to Donald Trump today. It was done to remove Mr. DeKlerk from power and establish the communist Nelson Mandela. Under Mr. DeKlerk, a world-renowned capitalist, the people were prosperous and happy. Under Mr. Mandela they suffered in dire poverty and despair. Published February 22, 2017

Protesters of President Donald Trump's immigration policies chant across the street from the U.S. Customs and Border Protection station Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017, in McAllen, Texas. (Joel Martinez/The Monitor via AP)

Immigration Order No. 2

The fight over who controls U.S. immigration policy is about to enter Round Two. President Trump pledges to come out swinging with a reformulated restriction on prospective immigrants. He seems deadly serious about defending the nation's borders, and those who want to throw open the borders to everyone seem just as determined to stop him. The outcome will determine nothing less than who defines America. Published February 22, 2017

FILE - In this Feb. 15, 2017 file photo, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington before the House Financial Services Committee for the Fed's semi-annual Monetary Policy Report to Congress.  Federal Reserve officials earlier this month discussed the need to raise a key interest rate again "fairly soon," especially if the economy remains strong. Minutes of the discussions in minutes released Wednesday, Feb. 22  showed that while Fed officials decided to keep a key rate unchanged at their Jan. 31-Feb. 1 meeting, there was growing concern about what could happen to inflation if the economy out-performed expectations. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The regulator cometh, and maybe goeth

There's a lot to be said about government regulation -- and much of it not good. Some regulation, given that human nature is what it is, is necessary. But sometimes it seems there's little difference between the government telling you how to spend your money and the government just taking it. Regulations are a lot like taxes. Published February 22, 2017

Maple tree sap drips from a tap into a bucket, Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017, in Brookline, N.H. Sen. Maggie Hassan, D-NH, led a discussion with maple syrup producers in New Hampshire about how climate change is impacting their industry. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

Carbonated politics

Every problem in Washington finally finds a solution, and it's usually called a tax. A group of policy mavens, eager to do something for everybody, proposes to tax carbon, the substance found in all forms of fossil fuels. It's the fourth-most abundant element in the universe. The idea is that if there's a levy on the carbon content of oil, coal and natural gas, consumers will use less of it. Presto! No more human-caused global warming. But it still smells like a tax. Published February 21, 2017

Stranded vehicles stand loaded with goods after the Jammu-Srinagar highway remained closed, at Jammu, India, Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017. The Jammu-Srinagar national highway remained closed for vehicular traffic for the second day Tuesday following landslides triggered by rains, officials said. (AP Photo/Channi Anand)

Unhappy motoring ahead

After years of slow but steady decline, traffic fatalities on the nation's highways and byways are increasing again. If the death and injury toll continues to rise in the years ahead, it's likely the fault of government supervision gone awry. Published February 21, 2017

Professor should apologize

A college student who recorded a professor making anti-Trump comments allegedly violated a policy that "prohibits the recording of someone on district property without that person's knowledge or consent" ("Caleb O'Neil, Orange Coast College student, suspended for recording professor's anti-Trump rant," Web, Feb. 15). What is the college's policy on a professor teaching hatred and vitriol about the president of the United States to students whose parents probably pay an enormous amount for their offspring to learn something of value, not to hear disparaging words about the leader of the free world? Published February 21, 2017

Stop 'death by decree'

Congress can stop the "death by decree" simply by writing regulation into statute ("Congress must stop death by decree," Web, Feb. 19). Members and staff who draft legislation can concurrently envision how they want the law carried out and put those ideas (including a cost cap) into the proposed statute, thus leaving no ambiguity or discretion to the executive branch. Published February 21, 2017