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THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Articles by THE WASHINGTON TIMES

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser speaks Jan. 2, 2015, after taking the oath of office at the District of Columbia Mayoral Inauguration ceremony at the Convention Center in Washington. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Mayor Bowser's all-inclusive budget

Knockoffs of the State of the Union addresses are all the rage now — we're waiting for someone to make a State of the Precinct Address. Mayor Muriel Bowser delivered her first State of the District Address this week, and, following script, there was a recitation of the accolades bestowed on the nation's capital. We're cool with foodies, the tech community, the entrepreneurs and the city is in the top five cities in new construction. Published April 1, 2015

U.S. skilled labor in short supply

Manufacturing has declined in the United States because the nature of manufacturing has changed. Hand labor can be and has been largely replaced by machines, and skilled labor has become even more important as a result. Published April 1, 2015

Obama's gift to Iran

President Obama and his crooked-shooting sidekick, Secretary of State John Kerry, are desperate for an agreement with Iran, placing some meaningless restrictions on Tehran's nuclear-weapons ambitions. At the outset of his "reign," Mr. Obama was also anxious to reduce our nuclear weapon stockpile to a state of nonexistence, and that is no doubt to be accomplished in some future executive order. Published April 1, 2015

More acts like Indiana's needed

I am tired of the Tim Cooks and Marc Benioffs of the world pushing their self-righteous and sanctimonious versions of "civil rights" and morality onto the rest of society ("Tim Cook, Apple CEO, calls 'religious objection' laws dangerous," Web, March 30). Published April 1, 2015

Vote out establishment politicians

Every nation's history has its share of turning points, events that change its course. The great ones are remembered in history. America's best-known recent turning point occurred on Aug. 6, 1945, when the United States cemented its place as the most powerful nation in the history of mankind. Published March 31, 2015

Not all discrimination is bad

It seems to me there is a false underlying assumption about the criticism of Indiana's religious freedom law ("Obama now hits religious freedom in Indiana," Page I, March 30). We are being conditioned to think of all discrimination as bad. I remember when a discriminating shopper was thought of as one who had standards of quality and would only buy products that came up to those standards. Is that type of discrimination bad? Published March 31, 2015

The U.S. Capitol building is seen through the columns on the steps of the Supreme Court in Washington, May 5, 2014. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

A challenge to Congress

When Richard Nixon signed the legislation establishing the Environmental Protection Agency in 1970, he was praised for his vision and commitment to conservation "going forward," though that cliche had yet to be coined. A few critics -- "outliers," in another cliche waiting to be born -- warned that the EPA could grow into a nightmare of a bureaucracy, but no one paid attention. Jeremiahs are rarely popular at the picnic. Published March 31, 2015

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence speaks question during a news conference, Tuesday, March 31, 2015, in Indianapolis. Pence said that he wants legislation on his desk by the end of the week to clarify that the state's new religious-freedom law does not allow discrimination against gays and lesbians. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

Bad faith in Indiana

The row over Indiana's religious liberty law breaks new ground in the war between religious liberty and the liberal political agenda. If there's no conflict, you have to make one up. This contretemps blew up out of nowhere, and inquiring minds want to know how and why it happened. Published March 31, 2015

Say no to convention switch

I am tired of conservatives being blamed for the actions of libertarians who wish to shift to a nominating convention. This contingent says a convention would be to the benefit of conservative candidates, but the only Republican that would benefit from such a switch would be Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul. Published March 30, 2015

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu chairs the weekly cabinet meeting in Jerusalem on Sunday, March 29, 2015. Netanyahu said he has "deep concern" over a pending nuclear deal the West appears close to signing with Israel's arch-enemy Iran. (AP Photo/Dan Balilty, Pool)

Virginia’s lawyers scratch Israel

This is the season for despising Israel and the Jews. The terrorists of Hamas dispatch agents of evil into the country bent on mayhem and sabotage. Palestinians fire rockets at Israeli children from launchers stationed at schools, hospitals and other places where they can find protection among the children, the lame, the halt and the helpless. President Obama contributes tone and tint to the campaign, determined to reward Iran with a sweetheart deal to protect its nuclear-weapons program, which it has promised to use to wipe Israel and the Jews "off the face of the earth." Mr. Obama, bent on revenge for censure and criticism, merely wants to wipe the Israeli prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, off the face of Israel. Published March 30, 2015

President Barack Obama speaks at the dedication of the Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate in Boston, Monday, March 30, 2015. The $79 million Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate dedication is a politically star-studded event attended by President Barack Obama, Vice President Joe Biden and past and present senators of both parties. It sits next to the presidential library of Kennedy’s brother, John F. Kennedy. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

The nuclear mirage in Iran

Many a lost traveler in the desert has spied an oasis in the sand and sun only to discover that it was only a mirage. In similar desperation, President Obama sees a good deal with Iran on the horizon, where he would put an end to the strife in the Middle East and finally earn the Nobel Peace Prize his admirers in Sweden gave him in a similar fit of euphoria as he took his first oath of office. Published March 30, 2015

Abortion as dangerous as ever

John M. Thorp Jr. and Clarke D. Forsythe clearly and correctly make the point that no one can truthfully say abortions are safe because there is no accurate data reported on abortion injuries and deaths ("The unhealthy state of abortion statistics," Web, March 26). Mr. Thorp and Mr. Forsythe suggest a federal law requiring the collection of abortion statistics so this data can be analyzed and the risks to women's health and safety can be accurately determined. Published March 30, 2015

Carson not candidate — yet

On March 27 I was advised that a guest op-ed I wrote for The Washington Times on March 25 was raising questions about whether I was describing myself as a candidate for president of the United States ("The learning curve of a candidate," Web, March 24). First, I have enjoyed my time writing for The Times and thank all of the readers who have given me feedback. While my words may not have been precise, be assured I have not declared my candidacy for president in any shape or form. Published March 30, 2015

Penalty for straying from ‘tribe’?

The Washington Times has risen one notch in my estimation by publishing Eric Althoff's article on former Rep. Bob Inglis, South Carolina Republican ("Bob Inglis breaks from Republican Party, advocates action to fight climate change," Web, March 24). While a climate change denier such as Willy Soon is being called a hero (rather than a rogue for accepting $1 million to shill for the fossil-fuel industry), a real hero such as Mr. Inglis gets booted out of the "tribe" for having the temerity to take a principled position not endorsed by Rush Limbaugh or Fox News. Published March 29, 2015

Some of the parents of the kidnapped school girls sit outside a compound during a meeting in Chibok, Nigeria. At least 11 parents of the more than 200 kidnapped Nigerian schoolgirls will never see their daughters again. Since the mass abduction of the schoolgirls by Islamic extremists three months ago, at least 11 of their parents have died and their hometown, Chibok, is under siege from the militants, residents report. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba, File)

The missing girls of Nigeria

Almost a year has gone by since Boko Haram, a radical and violent subsect of Islam, kidnapped 276 Nigerian schoolgirls from the Nigerian village of Chibok. Hopes of a rescue were raised when the Nigerian army called a truce between government forces and the militant Islamist group in October, but few believed a swift or good outcome was likely. So far there hasn't been one. Good faith, alas, rarely survives in Africa. Published March 29, 2015

Hypocrite Obama has armed guards

Now that the Islamic State has declared war on our stateside personnel ("U.S. sees 'more sophistication' in Islamic State cyber capabilities," Web, March 21) it is time President Obama rescinded his inappropriate executive order denying officers and staff noncommissioned officers the ability to be armed while on base or when traveling to and from their homes and quarters. Published March 29, 2015

FILE  In this March 25, 2015 file photo, Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid of Nev. waits on the floor of the House Capitol Hill in Washington for the arrival of Afghanistan's President Ashraf Ghani, who was to speak before  a joint meeting of Congress. Reid is announcing he will not seek re-election to another term. The 75-year-old Reid says in a statement issued by his office Friday that he wants to make sure Democrats regain control of the Senate next year and that it would be "inappropriate" for him to soak up campaign resources when he could be focusing on putting the Democrats back in power. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

The end of a Senate era

Harry Reid still has one good eye, and it's enough to read the handwriting on the wall. Announcing that he won't run for a sixth term, he said Friday that he wants to "go out at the top of my game." That's a face-saving way of saying he doesn't want to go out feet first. Published March 29, 2015

Islamic State won't stay in Middle East

Last summer I wrote several letters urging U.S. forces to take out the Islamic State before the terrorist group strikes America. I argued that the Islamic State might have its sights set on Capitol Hill or Hollywood. Given the terrorists' twisted logic, they believe these two iconic landmarks are the symbols of American hedonism and must be destroyed. Published March 29, 2015

FILE - In this Jan. 28, 2015 file photo, Attorney General nominee Loretta Lynch testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says the Senate will begin consideration of Lynch's nomination to be attorney general next week. Democrats have been pressing for the Senate to act on President Barack Obama's selection of Lynch, who is the U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of New York.  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

The Lynch nomination

The longer the United States Senate puts off the vote on her confirmation the less likely Loretta Lynch will become the attorney general. Some Democrats, in particular Sen. Dick Durbin of Illinois, have played the usual race card but so far none of the groups that specialize in expressions of outrage have said much, if anything. Published March 26, 2015

Celebrate global warmth

Just 13,000 years ago Earth was in the grip of a deathly ice age. Sea levels were indeed much lower than they are now, but much of the land surface was covered by thick sheets of ice. Life struggled to survive and many species were extinguished by the sterile, suffocating ice. Published March 26, 2015