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Storms not result of global warming

Recent catastrophic weather events raise two questions: Are tropical cyclones getting more frequent? And are they getting fiercer? Published September 12, 2017

Let Taiwan into Interpol

Interpol is the world's largest international police organization, with the role to enable police around the world to work together to make the world a safer place. The 86th Interpol General Assembly will be held Sept. 26-29, 2017, in Beijing. Published September 12, 2017

Vice President Mike Pence greets tourists at the Capitol in Washington as he arrives for a meeting with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, and President Donald Trump's top economic adviser Gary Cohn, to work on a tax code overhaul, Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017. The as-yet-undrafted bill to overhaul the tax code is the top priority for Trump and Republicans after the collapse of their effort to dismantle Barack Obama's health care law. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Republicans and the Senate filibuster

Certain Republican candidates for the U.S. Senate, and even a few incumbents, are so frustrated by the reflexive Democratic obstruction of President Trump's legislative agenda they want to abolish the filibuster. Published September 12, 2017

Destroyed trailers are seen at the Seabreeze trailer park along the Overseas Highway in the Florida Keys on Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017. Florida is cleaning up and embarking on rebuilding from Hurricane Irma, one of the most destructive hurricanes in its history. (Al Diaz/Miami Herald via AP)

Lessons from the storm

The lasting effect of two hurricanes, Harvey and Irma, may be settling the fundamental argument about climate change, although neither side in that bitter and costly dispute recognizes it just yet. Published September 12, 2017

Addy Valdez, 12, holds her cousin, Jasmine, while her family starts to clean up the damage from Hurricane Irma in Everglades City, Fla., Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. (Katie Klann/Naples Daily News via AP)

Disasters and dopes

Disaster comes in a variety of heartbreaking shapes and sizes, all of them unwelcome. Some, like global warming, are the work of nature; others are man-made. A little bit of rationality is all it takes to figure out which is which. But recent events suggest that the day they were handing out common sense some people stepped up to the nonsense window instead. Published September 11, 2017

Police and fire vehicles shield the view of a trailer home where five children died in a house fire in The Butte, Alaska, on Thursday, Sept. 7, 2017. Officials believes the victims were five girls, all between the ages of 3 and 12. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)

Racing to the self-driving car

The freedom of the open road holds a magnetic appeal for Americans, quickening like the flood when Henry Ford unleashed his Model T, but exhilaration can't be traded for the convenience of the "safety" of a car that drives itself. Such a car is a measure of progress only if it works. Published September 11, 2017

Give Lee credit for contributions

The pell-mell rush to remove any public reference to Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee is as thoughtless as it is short-sighted. There were reasons other than romanticizing slavery that led to honoring Lee. The post-war Lee is a figure that all Americans should appreciate. Published September 11, 2017

Bolster Japan to weaken N. Korea

As a counterweight to China and North Korea we should encourage Japan to build up its military capabilities. Japan should increase its front-line military personnel from 250,000 to 350,000 and increase the number of tanks from 700 to 1,000 and armored vehicles from 3,000 to 4,000. Published September 11, 2017

Terrorists use families as shields

Hezbollah is a large Shiite military/terrorist organization with headquarters in Lebanon and funding by Iran. It is the major power broker in Lebanon and has supported Iran's efforts in Syria to stabilize the Assad government by fighting against the democratic forces and the Islamic State there. Published September 10, 2017

Democracy for Rohingya, too

Let us recall when Western parliamentarians eulogized 'democracy' advocate and Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi. This was, after all, the lady who when asked about Myanmar's treatment of the Rohingya people, claimed they were interlopers. Published September 10, 2017

Supporters of the Former Georgian President and former Ukraine official Mikheil Saakashvili clash with border guards at Shegini check point on Ukrainian-Polish border, Ukraine, Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017. Saakashvili and a crowd of supporters are proceeding into Ukraine on foot after breaking through a line of guards on the Polish-Ukrainian border. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)

Debating correct usage

Words have been abused and, like, cheapened in our present day, but they're still, like, important. He who controls the language, as Orwell reminded us, controls the debate. One of the satellite arguments in the debate over immigration is what to call those who break the law by crossing the border illegally. Published September 10, 2017

In this Sept. 6, 2017, photo, Anthony Pham, talks in his Monroe, Ga., barber shop. He became a U.S citizen in 1987, five years after he immigrated from Vietnam.   Now a business owner and proud Republican in Georgias staunchly conservative 10th Congressional District, Pham says he supports maintaining legal status for immigrants who arrived in the country illegally as children, the so-called Dreamers brought by adult family members.  (AP Photo/Bill Barrow)

Doing the right thing about DACA

Once upon a time the Constitution meant something to everybody. Every American took pride in a Constitution that was written in plain language that anyone, even a lawyer, could understand. Ours was "a nation of laws," not of judicial fiat or bureaucratic whim. That was the strength of the exceptional nation. Published September 10, 2017

Navy War College better than ever

Although I enjoyed reading Col. Anderson's op-ed on the U.S. Naval War College, I do wish it was based on fact and not ignorance ("The Naval University for Conflict Avoidance," Web, Sept. 5). The Naval War College of course studies and prepares for war. In fact, we have greatly expanded the war-fighting component of our curriculum in the past year, and had Col. Anderson researched his topic rather than seeking mere sensationalism he would have known better. Published September 7, 2017

Learn from the past

Ed Rendell and Judd Gregg give an excellent bipartisan list of solutions to the national economic-security threat we face from Congress failing to raise the debt ceiling ("Playing politics with the nation's financial future," Web, Sept. 5). But they miss at least one solution that could solve many other problems: early investments in prevention. Published September 7, 2017

The unlikely romance on Capitol Hill

The Republican Congress of 2017 bears a remarkable resemblance to the New York Mets of 1962, their first year in baseball. The Mets couldn't hit the ball and they couldn't catch the ball and succeeded only in showing up for supper. Their manager, Casey Stengel, "the old perfessor," finally cried out in desperation: "Can't anybody here play this game?" Published September 7, 2017

President Donald Trump pauses during a news conference with the Emir of Kuwait Sheikh Sabah Al Ahmad Al Sabah in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday Sept. 7, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Thrown off the gravy train

The Environmental Protection Agency's gravy train just ain't what she used to be. Green groups are awestruck, agog and maybe even aghast at the news that the Trump administration has put a political operative to work vetting applications for EPA grants worth hundreds of millions of dollars. Published September 7, 2017

Good riddance to DACA

Once again President Trump has made rule of law paramount in determining his administration's policies, this time with respect to the blatantly unconstitutional and unlawful actions taken unilaterally by former President Obama to shield illegal aliens from immigration laws passed by Congress ("Mexico says it will embrace Dreamers 'with open arms,'" Web, Sept. 5). Published September 6, 2017

Pro-illegals stance often selfish

Stories citing the strong, promised southern-border stance of President Trump reveal that many business owners, unable to fill their employment needs with illegal immigrants, are hiring American workers and paying them more. Who could object to this development? A few, as it happens. Published September 6, 2017

Washington State University College Republicans President Amir Rezamand, right, and his predecessor, James Allsup, second from right, who resigned after attending the Confederate monuments protest in Charlottesville, Va., talk with unidentified students during a small rally for Free Speech organized by the Washington State University chapter of Young Americans For Liberty on Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017 in Pullman, Wash. (Geoff Crimmins/The Moscow-Pullman Daily News via AP)

Regulating free speech

"Everybody talkin' 'bout heaven ain't goin' there," as the ancient spiritual of the black church in America warns, and that goes double about free speech. "Free speech" sounds good to just about everybody, but actual free speech is a brew too strong for everybody. Many meddlesome do-gooders applaud government-regulated speech and call it free speech. Everybody's free to say what the government says is OK to say. What's not free about that? Published September 6, 2017

Vautrot's Cajun Cuisine shows the severe damage caused inside and out following heavy flooding, Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017 in Bevil Oaks, Texas. (Kim Brent/The Beaumont Enterprise via AP)

Fixing flood insurance in Harvey's wake

Hurricane Harvey took the most devastating flooding in the city's history to Houston, and the cost of repairing the damage will be astronomical. Sadly, the federal flood insurance program is already underwater and Harvey will only add to the flood of red ink. It's clear that Congress must reform the program so the premiums property owners pay more closely reflect the flood risk. Until that happens, nature's frequent fury will continue to undermine the finances of everyone. Published September 6, 2017