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Trumpcare would hurt many

I have a rare brain disorder called idiopathic intracranial hypertension. It affects one in 100,000. My brain thinks it has a tumor but it doesn't and for some reason it increases production of cerebral-spinal fluid, causing intense spikes in pressure in my head. It has been so bad that the fluid has twice leaked out my ear and I have had to undergo brain surgery to repair the leaks. Doctors tried installing a shunt to direct the extra fluid into my stomach, but that shunt has now failed and I'm awaiting a surgery date to have it removed. Published March 21, 2017

Making America great the first time

For decades George Melloan has been the insightful pater families of The Wall Street Journal's editorial pages. Recently he retired as deputy editor and columnist, although he continues still to contribute commentary to the paper. Yet, he also has taken time to research, report and create this charming and penetrating memoir of his life during the Great Depression and its parallels to Washington's continuing irresistible impulse to shape America to the liking of our political elites, left or right. Published March 21, 2017

'Someone else's babies' Americans

When quotes like Rep. Steve King's show up in the news, it threatens the very diversity of the generations of immigrants who expanded this country into what it is today ("White House dismisses Rep. King's comments about 'someone else's babies,'" Web, March 14). When these statements are offered by an elected official charged with making decisions about modern families, it concerns child welfare advocates because it harms kids. It is critical for those in power to remember that the people of this country aren't always a mirror image of those who lead. Published March 21, 2017

Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch talks about playing basketball with former Supreme Court Justice Byron White as he testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 21, 2017, during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

No time to go wobbly

Washington has a bad case of whiplash. Barack Obama spent eight years pushing the nation toward the radical transformation that he couldn't openly talk about. Now President Trump is attempting to stop that train in its tracks. Published March 21, 2017

President Donald Trump pauses while speaking at the National Republican Congressional Committee March Dinner at the National Building Museum, Tuesday, March 21, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

The Trump legacy

Donald Trump's greatest legacy (it's not too soon to speculate) is likely to be the end of the dependency of the rest of the world on the United States. This peculiar relationship was itself a legacy of World War II. Europe had been decimated by an earlier world war inflicted on an earlier generation, and the moral bankruptcy that followed enabled the ascendancy of the Nazis and the destruction of the Jews in Europe. Published March 21, 2017

Wiretap claim's good timing

A lot of folks are calling for "evidence" of the Trump Tower wiretaps. You don't start an investigation with evidence. That's what the investigation develops. You start with indications and develop the evidence or lack thereof. However, regardless of what the investigation unearths, President Trump's tactic and timing were brilliant. Published March 20, 2017

This image released by Sesame Workshop shows Julia, a new autistic muppet character debuting on the 47th Season of "Sesame Street" on April 10, 2017, on both PBS and HBO. (Zach Hyman/Sesame Workshop via AP)

Curing addiction to government art

Big Bird doesn't live at the Public Broadcasting System anymore, but some people have not got the word. Big Bird has moved uptown to new digs at Home Box Office, a subsidiary of Time Warner. They've even moved the street where Big Bird and Oscar the Grouch live. Sesame Street runs off Columbus Circle in Manhattan now. Published March 20, 2017

Vacation tips for Obama

It was interesting to read that former President Obama is vacationing in Tahiti ("Obama in Paradise: He's in Tahiti for a month," Web, March 16). This son of a World War II Pacific veteran (my late father was at the Battle of Midway) would suggest to Mr. Obama that he expand his travels to Guadalcanal, Saipan, Iwo Jima, the Coral Sea, Midway and Pearl Harbor so that he might appreciate the sacrifices made by the "Greatest Generation." Published March 20, 2017

Hospital workers walk by a journalist on a stakeout checking his mobile phone outside the forensic department of Kuala Lumpur Hospital, where the body of Kim Jong Nam, exiled half brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong Nam, has been kept, in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Monday, March 20, 2017. Malaysian police said Sunday that they are hunting for more North Korean suspects over the killing of Kim Jong Nam who was poisoned to death at Kuala Lumpur's airport on Feb. 13. (AP Photo/Daniel Chan)

Taming North Korea

If demography is destiny, in North Korea the guiding force is ancestry. Like his grandfather and father before him, Kim Jong-un suffers delusions of grandeur, surrounded only by frightened sycophants, coveting a place among the world's important nations. As Pyongyang edges closer to building a working nuclear missile capable of reaching the United States, Mr. Kim must get the right response to his vow to annihilate his enemies. Tough talk from the United States and its allies is only a stopgap. The solution, short of war, lies with China. Published March 20, 2017

Recourse for victims of 'sanctuaries'

The rule of law is under serious assault by the mainstream media and liberals. The fact that more than 500 municipalities throughout the United States are now declared "sanctuary cities" is outrageous. Published March 19, 2017

"Trumpcare" needs fixing

Republicans in support of "Trumpcare" are walking on thin ice. Democrats despise the bill (no surprise there) but even Republicans, the party of the bill's origin, differ in opinion. As a member of the latter group, I say, Back to the drawing board. Published March 19, 2017

President Donald Trump talks to the press corps inside Air Force One at the Palm Beach International Airport, Sunday, March 19, 2017, in West Palm Beach, Fla. Trump is returning to Washington. Standing next to Trump  is New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft.  (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

President Trump's left hand

Some of the Democrats trying to come to terms with their new home in the wilderness have chosen Ivanka, the president's accomplished daughter, as their "lifeline" to the past. They see her as the only vestige of light in an otherwise dark, alt-right Trump administration. The London Guardian says she's a "moral compass" for her father, who "might be able to rein in some of the more extreme policies of the administration." Published March 19, 2017

The Pentagon pushed back against reports that an aggressive string of recent U.S. military sorties have killed hundreds of civilians in Iraq and Syria. Defense Secretary James Mattis reportedly has been weighing a loosening of restrictions on U.S. airstrikes that the Obama administration kept in place in war against the Islamic State in Iraq, current and former U.S. officials have said. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

A job for the mad dog

When James Mattis, the retired Marine general once called "Mad Dog Mattis" by his troops for his no-nonsense combat leadership, was named secretary of Defense many senior officers were encouraged to think that at last someone would put his foot down, hard, on the use of the military as a petri dish for the social experiments so beloved by Barack Obama and Ashton Carter. Published March 19, 2017

Health insurance needs competition

We will never bring competition into the health-insurance market until we end the unhealthy relationship between insurance companies, healthcare providers and the IRS. Published March 16, 2017

President Donald Trump arrives for a St. Patrick's Day reception in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, March 16, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Mr. Trump's travel ban

President Trump and the lower federal courts are playing a dangerous game of ping-pong, and the nation's security is paying for it. The president, who is responsible for the nation's safety, proposes and certain federal judges, who have no such responsibility dispose. The president proposes again, and again a judge or two dispose. Published March 16, 2017

Sugar tax won't make us healthier

It looks like a food fight in Philadelphia ("When a sugar tax goes sour," Web, March 7). The way to deal with sugar is for the federal government to come clean, and there is no way that is going to happen. Sugar consumption is just the inevitable result of decades of vilifying healthy fats and creating, subsidizing and selling a food supply that is based on three grains plus sugar deep-fried in vegetable oil. And if you ask your doctor about this and how it relates to your health, be prepared for a shock. Your doctor is trained not to have a clue. Published March 16, 2017

Issa Hayatou, right, speaks to FIFA President Gianni Infantino, left, at the opening of the general assembly of the Confederation of African Football (CAF) in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Thursday, March 16, 2017. Issa Hayatou was voted out as president of the African soccer confederation on Thursday after 29 years in charge, losing to challenger Ahmad of Madagascar in a major shakeup for the sport on the continent. (AP Photo)

The hateful idea of hate crime

Three men were indicted this month in Washington for the fatal shooting of a 22-year-old transgendered woman, the robbing of a second transgendered woman and the assault on a third. A "hate crime" charge was added to the charges of conspiracy, robbery and first-degree murder, which could mean that the defendants, if convicted, could serve sentences half again as long as for "mere" murder. Published March 16, 2017

FILE - This Feb. 13, 2017, aerial file photo, shows a site where the final phase of the Dakota Access pipeline is taking place with boring equipment routing the pipeline underground and across Lake Oahe to connect with the existing pipeline in Emmons County near Cannon Ball, N.D. Federal Judge James Boasberg on Tuesday, March 14 denied a request by the Standing Rock and Cheyenne River Sioux to stop oil from flowing while they appeal his earlier decision allowing pipeline construction to finish. (Tom Stromme/The Bismarck Tribune via AP, File)

Tubes, tunnels, pipelines and progress

The Dakota Access Pipeline that triggered the resistance of the Indians, or Native Americans as some of them want to be called, is nearly complete and ready to take oil to the refineries. The Keystone XL Pipeline project, which endured an on-again, off-again status during the Obama years, is on again. It's a new day for energy in America. Published March 15, 2017

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam, right, waits for Air Force One with President Donald Trump aboard, to arrive Wednesday, March 15, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. Trump is scheduled to visit the home of President Andrew Jackson and later in the day speak about health care at a rally. (AP Photo/Mark Zaleski)

Health care in the balance

Lost in the partisan bluster and shouting about the future of Obamacare, and the Republican "repeal and replace" reform, is the stark reality that the nation has arrived, finally, at the point where it must decide what kind of health care it wants, and how to pay for it. Published March 15, 2017

Remove state-line limitation

To the majority in Congress: Please explain why you have not already produced a one-page bill to remove the federal limitations on selling health insurance across state lines. It remains a mystery why this is not a part of the current Republican health-care proposal, and even more why it has not already been done as a separate item. With not even an attempt to tell us why we are still waiting for it, the current majority in Congress appears to once again be the gang that can't (or is it won't?) shoot straight. You've got a lot of explaining to do. Published March 15, 2017