THE WASHINGTON TIMES | Stories - Washington Times
Skip to content

THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Articles by THE WASHINGTON TIMES

EDITORIAL: Burnout in the HOT lane

The Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) is eager to hand a significant chunk of Interstate 95/395 over to an Australian company for the next 80 years. That firm, Transurban, would charge solo drivers a fee for using the same lanes that currently may be used without charge during off-peak hours. Despite the lavish promises and hype, high-occupancy-toll (HOT) lane schemes have fizzled more often than they have succeeded. Published May 14, 2010

Memories surface through Rambler

"My dad had one of these," Gary Himelfarb says while seated behind the steering wheel of his 1961 Rambler. Published May 14, 2010

Kia Soul named one of "Best Family Cars for 2010" by Edmunds.com and Parents Magazine

Proven consumer and media favorite, the 2010 Kia Soul urban passenger vehicle recently was named to the "Best Family Cars for 2010" list in the "budget" category by leading automotive research site Edmunds.com and family-favorite Parents magazine, adding to an already extensive list of prestigious honors and recognitions for the funky hatchback. Published May 14, 2010

EDITORIAL: Black Panthers but no white rights

Let's avoid all the mealy-mouthed euphemisms: In the now-infamous New Black Panther Party voter intimidation case, Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr.'s Justice Department stands accused of being dishonest, racist, political hacks. The department's responses to those charges have been so weak that they may as well have pleaded nolo contendere. A hearing today by the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights provides the department one more chance to adequately explain itself. Right now, no adequate explanation seems to exist. Published May 14, 2010

EDITORIAL: The siren song of a would-be judge

Cheap ambulance chasers are bad enough, but far worse are those high-powered plaintiffs attorneys who chase big bucks by manufacturing the impression that a catastrophe has occurred. Today, the Senate Judiciary Committee will consider the judicial nomination of one of those sleazy profiteers. John J. "Jack" McConnell Jr. has no business getting within hailing distance of a federal judgeship, and the committee should dismiss him. Published May 13, 2010

EDITORIAL: Senate secrecy breeds corruption

Secrecy that hides public business from the public itself should be anathema in a constitutional republic. This is true whether the secrecy is a ploy to speed things up unnaturally or to slow things down unfairly. In different ways, Republican Sens. Tom Coburn of Oklahoma and Charles E. Grassley of Iowa and Democratic Sens. Claire McCaskill of Missouri and Ron Wyden of Oregon are working to end the secrecy that abets corruption and fiscal incontinence. Their proposed amendments, perhaps with a tweak or two, ought to be approved. Published May 12, 2010

EDITORIAL: One million votes against Obamacare

Congressional Democrats and the Obama administration are still feeling the euphoria after establishing a federal role in dictating health care coverage. Enacting an unpopular new law in the face of solid Republican opposition may have demonstrated broad legislative power, but the administration's deafness to public opinion may prove to be Obamacare's undoing. Published May 12, 2010

EDITORIAL: Concerns about Kagan

When President George H.W. Bush nominated New Hampshire Judge David Souter for the U.S. Supreme Court, columnist George F. Will famously quipped that the nominee's thin, inscrutable record made him "an empty Souter." President Obama's high-court nominee, Elena Kagan, boasts an equally meager paper trail, but there are enough signs of extreme ideological leftism to suggest that the Senate should move cautiously in considering her confirmation. Published May 11, 2010

EDITORIAL: Iran hangs a little fish

A year ago, The Washington Times helped bring the world's attention to the plight of Farzad Kamangar, a Kurdish school-teacher wrongly accused of being a terrorist by the Islamic regime in Tehran. He spent almost four years of physical and mental torture in Iran's prison system. Mr. Kamangar's suffering ceased Sunday at the end of a hangman's noose. He was 34 years old. Published May 11, 2010

EDITORIAL: In bed with Fannie and Freddie

America's greatest economic liability is also the greatest political liability for the Democratic congressional leadership. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have exposed taxpayers to $5.4 trillion in risk from loan guarantees, with taxpayers already having covered $126 billion in losses. So far, Democrats have been reluctant to include tough reforms on the profligate government-sponsored enterprises in the financial regulation package currently making its way through the legislative process. Published May 10, 2010

EDITORIAL: My big fat Greek deficit

The titanic 772-point drop in the Dow Jones Industrial Average since Tuesday should serve as a wake-up call to Washington's big spenders. The domestic unease facing Greece sent economic shock waves felt around the globe, and, unless we change our current ways, what happened there will happen here. Published May 10, 2010

EDITORIAL: Obama's good luck terrorism strategy

Responding to Republican charges that Times Square bomber Faisal Shahzad's plot failed only because of luck, Rep. Ike Skelton, Missouri Democrat, said, "What's wrong with being lucky?" Published May 10, 2010

EDITORIAL: Stinko de Mayo

On May 5, five students at Live Oak High School in Morgan Hill, Calif., were sent home for wearing clothing featuring the American flag. Their offense: trespassing on Mexican heritage during Cinco de Mayo. Administrators called the flag-wearing "incendiary" and likely to cause violence. The school district overrode the decision, and the boys were allowed to return to school. In response yesterday, about 200 students staged a walkout carrying Mexican flags. The question is: Who taught these kids to hate America so much? Published May 7, 2010

World Briefs

RUSSIA: Special forces storm oil tanker Published May 7, 2010

Briefly

THAILAND: Abhisit offers to dissolve parliament Published May 7, 2010

EDITORIAL: A bailout by any other name

The financial-reform package making its way through the Senate continues to get worse. Sen. Christopher J. Dodd, Connecticut Democrat, and Sen. Richard C. Shelby, Alabama Republican, struck a compromise Wednesday on an amendment that they hope will end the "too big to fail" debate by dropping the controversial $50 billion bailout fund proposal. Unfortunately, what's left in its place represents a massive expansion of government control over the economy. Published May 7, 2010