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Illustration: Guns and the 14th Amendment by A. HUNTER for The Washington Times.

EDITORIAL: No hope for gun grabbers

The left has permanently lost the argument on gun control. Despite their best efforts to take advantage of the tragic shooting in Arizona to promote pointless restrictions on things like the size of handgun magazines, the propaganda campaign is unlikely to go anywhere. Instead, the right to keep and bear arms continues to gain steam as state lawmakers around the country are enacting measures that would have been unthinkable not so long ago. Published March 1, 2011

EDITORIAL: Leash law for lawyers

The Republican-led House of Representatives is fighting back against big-money plaintiffs' attorneys who use campaign cash to control congressional Democrats. Published March 1, 2011

President Barack Obama, left, is followed by Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi before a group photo at the G-8 Summit in L'Aquila, Italy, Friday, July 10, 2009. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

EDITORIAL: Obama's Gadhafi waffle

Libya is engaged in a civil war. New protests have broken out in Oman, Bahrain and Yemen. The uprising in Tunisia, the pioneer state of the so-called "Arab Spring," is entering a second phase. As usual, the amateurish Obama administration has no idea what to do about any of this. Published March 1, 2011

** FILE ** Frank Buckles receives an American flag during Memorial Day activities at the National World War I Museum in Kansas City, Mo., in 2008. Mr. Buckles, the last U.S. doughboy from the Great War, died on Sunday, Feb. 27, 2011, of natural causes at his home in Charles Town, W.Va. (Associated Press)

EDITORIAL: The end of the American age

Frank Buckles, the last surviving American veteran of World War I, lived through the rise of the United States as a major world power and survived long enough to see the beginning of its decline. He died Sunday, aged 110, and much of America's greatness passed along with him. Published February 28, 2011

Illustration: Obamacare by Alexander Hunter for The Washington Times

EDITORIAL: Medicare case could nix Obamacare

Otherwise free people suffer "direct, tangible harm" when forced into a government medical system. That's the argument in a Feb. 11 brief in a court case with direct ramifications for Obamacare. The plaintiffs protest that citizens must enroll in Medicare to collect Social Security benefits for which they paid a lifetime of taxes. The tangible harm is caused because Medicare hampers their ability to secure - with their own resources - the best health care available. Published February 28, 2011

LIBERALS' FOE: "I'm on dartboards all over the country," Virginia Attorney General Kenneth T. Cuccinelli II says. (Associated Press)

EDITORIAL: Stopping the government land grab

The Virginia General Assembly last week gave its first approval to a constitutional amendment restoring the sanctity of private property in the commonwealth. The measure was made necessary by the reckless 2005 Supreme Court decision Kelo v. New London, which gave towns and cities free rein to grab land for the use and benefit of well-connected developers. Published February 28, 2011

House Speaker John A. Boehner, Ohio Republican, had "no comment" when asked by reporters over the weekend if he would seek to get the Senate to restore funding for a defense contract in his congressional district that was cut in the House. (Associated Press)

EDITORIAL: Shutdown showdown week

By week's end, we should know whether the House majority has what it takes to stand up for fiscal responsibility against President Obama and Senate Democrats. As the stopgap measure currently funding the federal government runs out Friday, the House is proposing to vote Tuesday on a two-week extension that includes $4 billion in cuts, but Democrats appear insistent on maintaining the current inflated spending levels. Failure to reach a settlement by the weekend would result in a shutdown of the non-essential functions of the federal government. That wouldn't be a bad thing. Published February 25, 2011

ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rolling Stone magazine's last issue in its larger format (left) has a cover on Sen. John McCain. The smaller new issue features Sen. Barack Obama.

EDITORIAL: Rolling Stone's war on our troops

"Rolling Stone magazine is engaging in a psychological operation trying to brainwash the American public," says an expert in military information operations. The magazine's Feb. 23 article, "Another runaway general: Army deploys psy-ops on U.S. senators," by Michael Hastings, is a confused attempt to create an issue where no issue exists, and a potentially libelous smear on the record of a senior military officer. This is what passes for reporting among the anti-war left. Published February 25, 2011

ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rolling Stone magazine's last issue in its larger format (left) has a cover on Sen. John McCain. The smaller new issue features Sen. Barack Obama.

EDITORIAL: Rolling Stone's war on our troops

Anything smacking of government mind control will be picked up by the anti-war blogosphere and spread like lightning, being further decontextualized and sensationalized along the way. When the fog of the media war lifts, however, one thing is clear: If any organization is involved in brainwashing, it is Rolling Stone magazine. Published February 25, 2011

Icy trees line Pennsylvania Avenue with plowed snow banked at its sides near the U.S. Capitol in Washington Sunday, Feb.  7, 2010, after the nation's capital was hit by a blizzard. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

EDITORIAL: D.C. needs a crackdown

A Washington city leader wants to rename one of America's most famous streets to suit his personal political agenda. In an online poll, Councilman Michael A. Brown is asking participants to choose to rename Pennsylvania Ave. "Give DC Full Democracy & Statehood Way," "51st State Way" or "Give DC Full Democracy Way," among other obnoxious options. Published February 24, 2011

The Islamic Center of America in Dearborn, Mich., is one of the largest mosques in the nation. Roger Stockham was wearing a ski mask and had fireworks in his car nearby on Jan. 24 when he was arrested, police say. (Associated Press)

EDITORIAL: Mosque surveillance a must

If the authorities want to locate Islamic extremists, they should keep looking at mosques. Just get the right person for the job. Published February 24, 2011

Assistant Attorney General Thomas E. Perez (AP Photo/Harry Hamburg)

EDITORIAL: Protecting the troop vote

The Obama administration isn't doing enough to protect voting rights of soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines serving America overseas. That's the news that emerged from a hearing by the House Administration Committee last week investigating complaints that a military voting statute enacted in 2009 is, in some cases, being ignored. Published February 24, 2011

Illustration: Oil by Alexander Hunter for The Washington Times

EDITORIAL: The left's drive toward $8 gas

With oil prices surging above $100 a barrel yesterday, consumers are realizing they will be paying a heavy price at the pump for the unrest in the Middle East. A perfect storm of foreign and domestic policy choices by the Obama administration has paved the way for European-style energy prices to arrive on these shores. Far from being alarmed, President Obama sees the prospect of $8 a gallon gas as an opportunity. Published February 23, 2011

US President Barack Obama leaves after speaking at the Human Rights Campaign National Dinner at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington on October 10, 2009. Obama vowed to repeal the "don't ask, don't tell" policy which prevents US servicemen from revealing their homosexuality. AFP PHOTO/Jewel SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)

EDITORIAL: President abandons marriage

The Obama administration announced yesterday that it will not defend the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA). This is the next step of President Obama's strategy to force the radical homosexual agenda on America against the will of the people and Congress. Published February 23, 2011

A chicken hangs out under the playset in the backyard of the Silver Spring, Md., home that she shares with two other hens and a human family of five.

EDITORIAL: Democrats: Cowards of the Country

Democrats have fled state legislatures rather than face up to doing the people’s business. They should change the symbol of their party from the grey donkey to the yellow chicken. Published February 23, 2011

ROTC battalion commander Alex Woody (back right) ranks No. 8 out of 4,702 cadets. He is one of America's top 10 Army ROTC recruits.

EDITORIAL: Blind hatred of the ROTC ban

Former U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Anthony Maschek last week received an unfitting welcome at a town-hall meeting at Columbia University. The Iraq-War-veteran-turned-college-freshman was heckled, mocked and inexplicably called a "racist" during a forum convened to discuss reinstatement of ROTC on campus 43 years after the program's expulsion. The university gave Iran's Islamic strongman Mahmoud Ahmadinejad a warmer welcome than this young man who shed his blood to serve his country. Published February 22, 2011

Illustration: Obama windmills by A. HUNTER for The Washington Times.

EDITORIAL: Obama's deprivation nation

As President Obama hurries to catch up to Europe in the conversion to so-called green energy, our trans-Atlantic neighbors are finding that they can no longer afford to support their "sustainable" power schemes. Mr. Obama's fiscal 2012 budget, released Feb. 14, takes a page from the global-warming believer's hymn book. It calls for a 4.2 percent boost in the Department of Energy's budget to $29.5 billion. It also pours $8 billion into solar panels, windmills and batteries, blowing the country in the wrong direction. Published February 22, 2011

Illustration: Obamacare by Alexander Hunter for The Washington Times

EDITORIAL: Obamacare's race against the cures

Misguided health care policy has serious side effects. As regulators refuse to approve new medical devices and medicines, venture capital for health care has dried up, and hospitals are running out of some important drugs. It has caused what one analyst has called a serious medicine crash. Published February 22, 2011

Ginny Fleck attends a rally at the Brown County Courthouse in downtown Green Bay, Wis., on Wednesday, Feb. 16, 2011, to protest Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's budget repair bill. (AP Photo/Green Bay Press-Gazette,  H. Marc Larson)

EDITORIAL: Big Labor's theater of the absurd

Wisconsin's labor protests have been likened to the Middle East uprisings, but they have more the flavor of a spoiled brat's temper tantrum. It is as if labor activists have adopted the motto, "Greed, for lack of a better word, is good." Published February 21, 2011

A D.C.-based photo-radar camera (BARBARA L. SALISBURY/THE WASHINGTON TIMES)

EDITORIAL: Science for hire

Making creative use of scientific reports to promote a political or commercial agenda is nothing new. The famous hockey-stick graph found in the United Nations report on global warming turned out to be based on manipulated data, as exposed in the Climategate e-mails. Just last month, the British Medical Journal published "How the vaccine crisis was meant to make money," a report ripping apart the supposedly definitive 1998 study linking autism to vaccine use. Published February 21, 2011