THE WASHINGTON TIMES | Stories - Washington Times
Skip to content

THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Articles by THE WASHINGTON TIMES

National Security Adviser Susan Rice (Associated Press) **FILE**

Susan Rice strikes again

Susan Rice, the most notorious liar in the employ of Barack Obama, is revealed as the queen of the unmasked ball. She abused her position as the national security adviser to the president to obtain the "masked" name of at least one member of the Trump transition team in the weeks between the election and the inauguration. What she did with the information is anybody's guess, and anybody could make a pretty good one. Published April 4, 2017

Left's Gorsuch treatment abhorrent

Few things are more frustrating than discovering that you are not negotiating in good faith. For that reason alone the Trump administration is completely justified in its frustration, if not anger, toward Senate Democrats. Judge Gorsuch is about as strong a Supreme Court pick as has come along in quite some time. He's a man of impeccable character and thoughtful jurisprudence, and he has demonstrated a healthy respect for the laws of the United States. He is exactly the kind of Supreme Court justice that President Trump promised the American people he would nominate. Published April 3, 2017

Not 'enlightened' enough

So Sen. Chuck Schumer, New York Democrat, wants to filibuster Neil Gorsuch out of being nominated to the Supreme Court. It's a good thing Mr. Gorsuch isn't Jesus, or Mr. Schumer would probably have the cross and nails out by now. He wants someone more mainstream and abortion-friendly — like Ruth Bader Ginsburg (or Karl Marx). Mr. Gorsuch's main problem when it gets right down to it is that he simply isn't Mao enough, lacks the proper insight into the leftist agenda and doesn't goose-step to the apparatchik ideology. In other words, he simply isn't one of the "enlightened ones," and is thus seen as a renegade and loose cannon. In short Mr. Gorsuch just doesn't get it. He is therefore deemed bad for America. Published April 3, 2017

Senate Minority Leader Sen. Charles Schumer of N.Y., speaks during an interview in his office on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, March 30, 2017. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Sen. Schumer's chutzpah

Chuck Schumer is a New Yorker, so he knows about chutzpah. He schmears it liberally on his breakfast bagel. Chutzpah is the useful Yiddish for "shameless audacity," once defined by the young man who murdered his parents and begged the judge and jury to show "mercy for a poor orphan boy." Published April 3, 2017

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, left, walks with Secretary of State Rex Tillerson to a lunch with President Donald Trump and Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi at the White House in Washington, Monday, April 3, 2017. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

No playing Russian roulette

On paper, NATO is an imposing institution --one of the world's oldest and largest collective defense alliances. On the ground, its strength hinges on a single question: Will its 28 signatory nations actually spend blood and treasure to honor their pledge of collective defense in time of war? No one will know until the dread moment of truth arrives. With Russia more menacing than ever, it's gut-check time for NATO. Published April 3, 2017

Key illegals stats missing

"Rape at Maryland high school stirs up debate on sanctuary cities" (Web, March 22) cites statistics from a "study" applying enigmatic references to different statistical populations, and it misses key information. Using the 2015 Census Bureau number for the U.S. population (318,881,992) and the Justice Department number for the prison population (6,741,400), one gets a total of 2.11 percent of the total population as incarcerated that year. From the article's "5.6 percent" reference one derives that 377,518 illegals are incarcerated. According to Voice of America News in December 2015 there were an estimated 11 million illegals in the United States at that time. That would mean 3.43 percent of them were incarcerated. Published April 2, 2017

Hillary wrongs swept under rug

With all these attacks against and investigations into President Trump, I wonder about the status of the 'quid-pro-quo' assertions against the Clinton Foundation. Has anything ever come of it? Or has that news been swept under the carpet? If it's the latter, the uranium deal that Bill Clinton coordinated with Kazakhstan doesn't get any scrutiny, even though it had some significant security implications. Published April 2, 2017

In this Feb. 27, 2017 file photo, National Governors Association (NGA) Chairman, Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe holds a briefing on Capitol Hill in Washington. Four former sailors who became known as the "Norfolk Four" as they fought rape and murder convictions, saying police intimidated them into falsely confessing to the crimes two decades ago have been pardoned by Gov. McAuliffe on Tuesday, March 21, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File) **FILE**

More bluster from the bag man

If Hillary Clinton had won, Gov. Terry McAuliffe of Virginia might now be in President Clinton's Cabinet. But there is no President Clinton, and there is no Secretary McAuliffe, and the nation's gain is Virginia's loss. His days in Richmond are numbered, but the Old Dominion must endure 10 more months of bluster from Bill and Hillary's longtime bag man. Published April 2, 2017

A modest suggestion to move Congress

Donald Trump, like a lot of Republicans, is mightily disappointed with the Freedom Caucus for blocking repeal of Obamacare, so he has gone to war with the caucus and thinks he can persuade some Democrats to help him repeal Barack Obama's signature "accomplishment." He will learn to his sorrow that this is a recipe for more disappointment. Democrats don't do compromise. Published April 2, 2017

Taming the federal behemoth

President Trump, with his budget proposals and executive orders, has taken the first necessary steps toward arresting the invasive bureaucratic kudzu that is the administrative state. Americans face no greater threat, domestic or foreign, than that posed by the liberty and wealth stealing apparatchik of our horrid and confiscatory governing class, abetted at every turn by a malignant media and political establishment. If we are to remain sovereign and prosperous, we will need to support the Trump administration as it hacks and rips and burns the roots and sinew of the federal behemoth. The defenders of the status quo will try to misdirect our attention and undermine Mr. Trump's legitimacy; we must see them for the self-perpetuating shape shifters they are and reject their lies and fakery. Published March 30, 2017

Liberal blacklists nothing new

Unfortunately the events described in "How liberal professors are blackballing studies confirming Trump's claim of voter fraud" (Web, March 30) are nothing new in today's America. The article says that liberals are blacklisting the professors at Old Dominion University because they don't agree with the professors' studies into illegal voting. What they don't agree with are the scientific conclusions. But blacklisting professors based on their studies has been happening for a long time. Published March 30, 2017

Coverage should be a choice

Your editorial "Collapse and replace" (Web, March 28) does not contest the Congressional Budget Office's estimate of 24 million Americans losing medical-insurance coverage if Obamacare were to repealed. The CBO has grossly overestimated this figure by not taking into account the number of people who don't want coverage through Obamacare and signed up only because they didn't want to pay the fine (it is not a tax). Allowing people to choose not to be insured is hardly tantamount to throwing them off their health-insurance plans. Published March 30, 2017

President Donald Trump greets Danish Prime Minister Lars Lokke Rasmussen at the White House in Washington, Thursday, March 30, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Snubbing the White House

It's hard to be friends with someone who doesn't want to be your friend. A clenched fist is a poor return of a hand offered in friendship. Donald Trump, who knows what the Democrats in Congress think of him, nevertheless tried to reach out to the opposition with an invitation to a Senate-only reception in the East Room of the White House. Published March 30, 2017

Eric as Evas Nelson, from Sandwich, Mass., and parents of a transgender child, wait for Boston Mayor Marty Walsh to arrive to raise a flag supporting the transgender community at City Hall, Thursday, March 30, 2017, in Boston. The flag-raising event was organized after the "Free Speech Bus," painted with the words "boys are boys" and "girls are girls," parked outside City Hall earlier in the day. (AP Photo/Bill Sikes)

Queering the numbers

The 2020 census won't ask questions about sexual orientation and gender identity, and the homosexual lobby is infuriated. The National Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) Task Force accuses the Trump administration of nothing short of genocide. "We've been erased!" the task force cried. Published March 30, 2017

Health insurance made simple

Washington either does not understand or refuses to acknowledge that keeping costs down and protecting the interests of the consumer are best achieved by assuring good competition among private enterprise in a market characterized by a balance of supply and demand. The primary health-plan objectives of both major parties can be achieved pretty simply, and here's how: Published March 29, 2017

Debt bubble near bursting

The liberals in Congress and across the country have bought into the false notion that a top-heavy bureaucracy and a massive group of people can efficiently serve the needs of a country that now has a population of more than 330 million. In all candor, our system of government has actually done pretty well when one considers the other countries and their various forms of government. However, there comes a point at which a government may no longer be able to pay its huge debt and risks being abandoned by the private citizens and foreign countries who own that debt. We are now at the $20-trillion-in-debt level, and the interest alone is becoming extremely problematic. Published March 29, 2017

Republican leaders Rep. Tim Moore, left, and Sen. Phil Berger, hold a news conference Tuesday, March 28, 2017, in Raleigh, N.C., where they announced they thought they had reached a compromise with Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper on a replacement for HB2. Berger holds papers that he said were the Governor's proposal. The law limits LGBT nondiscrimination protections and requires transgender people to use public restrooms corresponding to the sex on their birth certificate.  (Chris Seward/The News & Observer via AP)

March Madness in the restroom

The National Collegiate Athletic Association, or NCAA, has been overcome by a form of March Madness that has nothing to do with basketball or brackets. It has everything to do with restrooms and political correctness on steroids. Published March 29, 2017

Unleashing American energy

President Trump has nullified many of Barack Obama's climate change fantasies and the sky is still up there. But judging by the uproar from voices in the climate change industry, only an unexpected miracle is keeping the firmament in place. As cooler heads keep an eye on the thermometer in the months and years to come, America can balance legitimate concerns about pollution against the necessity of exploiting affordable energy. Published March 29, 2017

Renewables may already be working

Are we hopping from the fossil-fuel frying pan into the "fracking" fire ("Carbon dioxide emissions stayed flat in 2016, global economy expanded," Web, March 21)? And are we being a little myopic while doing it? First, the reduction of carbon-dioxide emissions could be attributable to the rise of alternative energy sources. The International Energy Agency website displays an informative graph illustrating the growing utilization of solar- and wind-energy sources. Alternative sources don't emit carbon dioxide. (Nor do they emit methane or cause earthquakes in Oklahoma.) Published March 28, 2017

Stop trying to replace Obamacare

I voted for Donald Trump because I thought he was serious about getting rid of Obamacare. Instead it turns out he was willing to go along with "Ryancare," which is just Obamacare 'lite.' Published March 28, 2017