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Cops who shoot innocents must pay

Does anyone remember the case of the Minneapolis police officer killing an unarmed Australian woman a few months ago? In case you have forgotten, Justine Damond called 911 because she thought someone was being sexually assaulted outside her home. After the police showed up, she walked out to their car. Officer Mohamed Noor killed her. Published September 20, 2017

Screwy Wedding Cake Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Cakewalk to the Constitution

The U.S. Supreme Court takes up a free-speech case in the October term, and making the right decision should be a piece of cake. The justices will be asked to decide whether the government can require someone to say something he doesn't want to say. Published September 19, 2017

Government manipulating CPI?

I have been saying for 10 years that the federal government has been adjusting the consumer price index basket of goods by including more low-cost items and reducing higher-cost items. It has done this manipulation in order to minimize its obligations for payment increases by the Social Security Administration and the federal-employee retirement system. Published September 19, 2017

Trump predicted own presidency

This year, Sept. 2 came and went like most days of the weekend news cycle. But I believe the entire media missed the anniversary of a significant event in American history: the 30th anniversary of the genesis of the Trump presidency. Published September 19, 2017

U.S. President Donald Trump addresses the 72nd session of the United Nations General Assembly, at U.N. headquarters, Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

Fair warning at the U.N.

No more globaloney. That was the enduring message President Trump had Tuesday for the United Nations. He gave it to the delegates with the bark on, but tempered with just enough of the butter they're accustomed to hearing from their indulgent betters. Published September 19, 2017

President Donald Trump speaks during a dinner with Latin American leaders at the Palace Hotel during the United Nations General Assembly, Monday, Sept. 18, 2017, in New York. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

The worth of a president

"The chief business of the American people," Calvin Coolidge said, "is business." The 30th president didn't say much, but he often said memorable things. But we never had a businessman president until Donald Trump. Published September 18, 2017

In this Feb. 3, 2017, file photo, Jemele Hill attends ESPN: The Party 2017 in Houston, Texas. Hill tweeted recently that the president is "a white supremacist who has largely surrounded himself (with) other white supremacists." The White House spokeswoman called that comment "a fireable offense." (Photo by John Salangsang/Invision/AP, File)

Apology, apology, who's got an apology?

The art of the apology has become junk science, particularly in the entertainment business. Calibrating an apology is hard work, figuring out to whom the apology is aimed, and how much of it is sincere. A rule of thumb is that apologies are spoken to the wind, and none of them are sincere. Published September 18, 2017

Human eye best first line

I suggest an additional probable factor in the recent U.S. Navy ship collisions: over-reliance on electronic aids (rather than the human eye) for navigation. Published September 18, 2017

Stop supporting U.N.

President Trump's upcoming speech at the United Nations is an opportunity to redress the international body for its failure to promote and defend world peace. Decades of meaningless resolutions have led to thousands of innocent deaths. Allowing Russia and China to prevent meaningful sanctions or actions to curtail North Korea's ability to launch long-range nuclear missiles is indefensible. Neither Russia nor China would tolerate having missiles fly over their countries, so why do they not support actions against North Korea for its missile launches over Japan? Published September 18, 2017

FILE- In this Thursday, Sept. 7, 2017 file photo, President Donald Trump, center, gestures as he greets the Amir of Kuwait Sheikh Sabah Al Ahmad Al Sabah as he arrives at the White House in Washington. Kuwait says it will expel North Korea's ambassador and four other diplomats from its embassy in Kuwait City. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

The art of no deal

Someone should lend Marc Short, the White House director of legislative affairs, a copy of President Trump's book, "The Art of the Deal." The president rightly rebuked his predecessor's negotiators and promised better ones in his own administration, but Mr. Short could use some tips. His suggestion last week that funding for the Mexican border wall doesn't necessarily have to be included in a compromise with Democrats over DACA is giving away the president's store. Published September 17, 2017

Religious bigotry in the Senate

Dianne Feinstein is one of the few independent Democratic voices left in the U.S. Senate. She's a former mayor of San Francisco, and knows a nut when she sees one, and as the senior Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee she has learned things there that would sober anyone but the most dedicated peacenik. Published September 17, 2017

Say thank-you to local eateries

Today, why not participate in National Cheeseburger Day? Ignore all health-food-police rants about how unhealthy hamburgers are and treat yourself by going to your favorite fast-food place, diner, restaurant or steak house and order a cheeseburger. Published September 17, 2017

Obama still working from the shadows

Many leftists are still calling for President Trump's tax returns. This, of course, is just another ploy, like the Russian-collusion story, to try to get something on Mr. Trump that can be magnified and distorted. Published September 17, 2017

Democratic leaders fraudulent

Tammy Bruce's recent piece, "Why Democrats fear voter fraud investigations" (Web, Sept. 13), illuminates the real motive behind Democratic resistance to investigations into voter fraud. Vowing to do this or that ad nauseam, Democrats now have the Presidential Advisory Commission in their crosshairs. Knowing full well that voter fraud exists and that it demonstrably benefits vote tabulations for Democratic candidates essentially makes the party leadership accessories to fraud. Published September 14, 2017

Status quo good for politicians

In simple terms, here is the reason nothing ever gets done with politicians: Every politician runs for office on a platform of fixing all that's wrong, but if they fix those problems, what will they have to run on the next time? Published September 14, 2017

New Seattle Mayor Bruce Harrell, center, gets up after signing paperwork moments after taking the oath of office for mayor Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2017, in Seattle. Harrell, who was City Council president, assumed the temporary position following the resignation of Mayor Ed Murray. Murray resigned after it was reported that a fifth man, one of his cousins, had accused Murray of molesting him decades ago. Murray has vehemently denied all of the accusations against him and had already decided not to seek re-election. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

EDITORIAL: Racial injustice in Seattle

We can't ever be too sensitive about racial insensitivity, and kudos today to Larry Gossett, a member of the city council of Seattle, which is one of the most sensitive cities anywhere. Mr. Gossett is not necessarily a fan of the stinky stuff you collect on the bottom of your shoe when you step in something a dog has left on the sidewalk, but he urges caution -- and sensitivity -- about how it's cleaned up. Published September 14, 2017

FILE - In this Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017, file photo, demonstrators clash during a free speech rally, in Berkeley, Calif. Police in the city of Berkeley can use pepper spray on violent demonstrators after the City Council voted Tuesday, Sept. 12, to allow police to use pepper spray to repel attacks on officers and others during the kind of violent protests that have rocked the city this year. (AP Photo/Josh Edelson)

The inconvenience of free speech

Free speech can be so inconvenient. A growing number of Democrats like the First Amendment's guarantee of the right to free speech and assembly, but only for themselves and for those who agree with them. This is a fundamental misunderstanding of the First Amendment, which does not guarantee pleasing, nice, or even responsible speech, but free speech -- even odious speech. Published September 14, 2017

Visitors walk by the map of two Koreas at the Imjingak Pavilion in Paju, South Korea, Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2017. South Korea said Wednesday it conducted its first live-fire drill for an advanced air-launched cruise missile it says will strengthen its pre-emptive strike capability against North Korea in the event of crisis. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

Kicking the carrot down the road

Somewhere over the rainbow, the United Nations has squeezed out another resolution ordering North Korea to be nice, to abandon its nuclear weapons, or else. Off in the great somewhere, where colors meet the clouds, there's faith that sanctions resolution No. 8 will succeed where the previous seven didn't. On the ground where reality unfolds, it's clear that only stronger medicine can cure the rogue regime of its practiced evil. Published September 13, 2017

Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., chairman of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, and Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, a key member of the group, walk through Statuary Hall at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2017. With President Donald Trump wanting a legislative solution to replace the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, Meadows has said he will put together a working group to craft a conservative immigration plan. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Why the debt ceiling is important

When Jack Kent Cooke fired George Allen the elder as the coach of the Washington Redskins, he remarked that "I gave George an unlimited budget and he exceeded it." George should have been a congressman. Published September 13, 2017

Serbia entitled to resolution 'carrot'

David Phillips ("Why Serbia must recognize Kosovo's independence," Web, Sept. 4) presents a very distorted and immature view of Kosovo's "independence." As is common with pro-Kosovo, Albanian Western "experts" and commentators, Mr. Phillips' piece presents no carrots to Serbia and offers no long-term solutions to the conflicted region other than Serbia giving up the spiritual Jerusalem of its Orthodox-Christian Serbs, who have resided there for over 1,300 years. Published September 13, 2017