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A large crowd gathers for the rally outside the Lackawanna County Courthouse in Scranton Pa., Sunday Feb. 19, 2017, to focus on protecting the Affordable Care Act, Medicare and Medicaid. (Jason Farmer/The Times & Tribune via AP)

The rose by another name

The courts continue to wrestle with homosexual nuptials and the meaning of "participation." The Washington state Supreme Court last week held that a florist in Richland, Wash., had no right in the law to refuse to provide flowers to two men for their same-sex wedding because to participate in such a rite would violate her deeply held religious beliefs. Published February 19, 2017

Focus on jobs, not feelings

During his campaign, President Trump talked a lot about infrastructure. He was going to build new schools, new roads, new bridges, etc. He was going to put 100,000 people to work, and that was just for starters. So far, all I've heard for three weeks is 'Everyone is picking on me.' Mr. Trump doesn't like what this person said; he doesn't like what that person said. He is constantly sending out angry tweets. Published February 16, 2017

Media did due diligence on nominees

Now that Michael Flynn has been forced out as national security adviser, Andrew Puzder has had to withdraw his name from nomination for labor secretary and Betsy DeVos was so unpopular as to have needed the vice president to break a tie vote on her confirmation as education secretary, one wonders whether the Trump administration will learn anything from these debacles. Published February 16, 2017

About 50 fast food workers protest the nomination of former Hardees CEO Andrew Puzder to lead the U.S. Department of Labor on Thursday, Jan. 12, 2017, outside the current headquarters of the fast food chain in downtown St. Louis. Fast food workers claim Puzder is unfit for the position because of his policies toward employees as Hardees boss. (Christian Gooden/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)

Trump's missing free market warriors

Andy Puzder's withdrawal for consideration as Donald Trump's secretary of Labor might have been premature but for the easy surrender of the Republicans in the Senate to a left-wing slander campaign. Mr. Puzder's replacement, R. Alexander Acosta, is a labor lawyer without any real-life experience in hiring workers, but he looks confirmable. However, this leaves the new administration with almost no sound voices for free-market ideas. Published February 16, 2017

Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., ranking member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, left, and Rep. Eliot Engel, D-N.Y., ranking member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, join other Democrats to say they want an investigation into President Donald Trump's relationship with Russia, including when Trump learned that his national security adviser, Michael Flynn, had discussed U.S. sanctions with a Russian diplomat, during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Learning the wrong lesson

In politics as in medicine, getting the diagnosis wrong can be fatal. The wrong medicine won't cure what ails you and it's likely to make things worse. Published February 16, 2017

Needed: Fearless leaders

The Republican Party is beset by leaders who fear the press. Former House Speaker John Boehner displayed enormous trepidation when speaking to media members, and current Speaker Paul Ryan shows the same weakness. For the past four years Ryan has encouraged his members to vote with the Democrats. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell doesn't even possess confidence in conservatism, much less confidence in espousing it, in public. Published February 15, 2017

Grow Republican base organically

The GOP, under President Trump and Vice President Pence, has the ability to rewrite many new U.S. strategy playbooks. The primary Republican strategy must be to expand and broaden the party's successes and capitalize on the Trump-delivered majorities. Published February 15, 2017

"I think it's very, very unfair what's happened to Gen. Flynn, the way he was treated, and documents and papers that were illegally, I stress that, illegally leaked," President Trump told reporters on Wednesday. (Associated Press)

The swamp strikes back

Hercules cleaned the Augean Stables by diverting the course of two rivers through the gates to carry off the grunge and dreck. Donald Trump will need more than a river to collect the dreck as he drains the swamp that is Washington. Published February 15, 2017

Then-President-elect Donald Trump walks Labor Secretary-designate Andy Puzder from Trump National Golf Club Bedminster clubhouse in Bedminster, N.J., in this Nov. 19, 2016, file photo. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Democrats finally get a scalp

If at first you don't succeed, try, try again. And then try some more. The Democrats finally got a Cabinet scalp Wednesday, when Andrew Puzder withdrew his name from consideration as secretary of Labor. Democrats had earlier unsuccessfully targeted Attorney General Jeff Sessions, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos for honorary termination with extreme prejudice, and missed. Published February 15, 2017

Voters must pay attention again

Thomas Jefferson and the Founding Fathers held a unique view of the branches of government, their powers and how these powers related to one another. Maybe it's time we revisited this view. The Constitution is at stake and the way in which our country resolves the internal conflicts it is experiencing today could determine our fate for many years to come. Published February 14, 2017

Schumer an embarrassment

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer is becoming a laughing matter in politics. It is amazing how he has changed. Published February 14, 2017

Before the missiles whistle

The rogues are restless. The mischief of the bullies doesn't flag from one administration to the next. Projectiles light up the sky from remote launch pads in far-off places, and where there are missiles, there must be a reliable, extensive shield against them. Published February 14, 2017

National Security Adviser Michael Flynn, arrives for the President Donald Trump, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe joint new conference in the East Room of the White House, in Washington, Friday, Feb. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) ** FILE **

Flynn's out, but the moles are not

Michael Flynn is gone as the president's official national security adviser, and now the important back story moves to the front. What is this curious episode really all about? Nothing is ever as it seems in Washington. Published February 14, 2017

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer wants more specifics about the philosophy of Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch. (Associated Press)

Searching for departed Democrats

Democrats have been meeting over the past few days at "retreats" near Washington to figure out what happened to them last November. They're trying to plot a strategy to destroy the president they despise and to overcome a ballot-box disaster that has left them with fewer officeholders, from top to bottom and across the 50 states, than they've had in a century. Published February 13, 2017

Disgraceful Democrats

The Senate is referred to as "the greatest deliberative body in the world," which is one of those big lies that are believed if repeated often enough. During the recent confirmation hearings, I haven't seen any deliberating. Published February 13, 2017

Vice President Mike Pence administers the oath of office to Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price, accompanied by his wife Betty, Friday, Feb. 10, 2017,  in the in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

No retreat from Obamacare repeal

He's not an obstetrician, but Dr. Tom Price better know how to deliver. The Atlanta physician and member of Congress survived a bruising confirmation battle en route to a 52-47 party-line Senate confirmation to become the new secretary of Health and Human Services. He's the point man for the repeal and replacement of Obamacare, which was President Trump's most important domestic pledge to voters. Success or failure will determine soon whether the doctor -- and his boss in the Oval Office -- are heroes or goats. The clock is ticking. Published February 13, 2017

Robart politically motivated

President Trump has the right to be incensed about the conduct of 'left coast' courts. Although the president's tweet about Seattle Federal District Court Judge James Robart was misinterpreted, Mr. Trump was correct that the judgment against his immigration suspension is not the act of a judge, but is instead a political act. Published February 13, 2017

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: NFL talent still getting snubbed

I was disappointed that longtime Washington Redskins tackle Joe Jacoby was again overlooked by the Pro Football Hall of Fame ("Redskins great Joe Jacoby does not make Hall of Fame," Web, Feb. 4). The legendary "Hog," a four-time Pro Bowler (1983-1986) and three-time Super Bowl champion (XVII, XXII, XXVI), deserves the honor. Published February 12, 2017

Repeal costly Obamacare now

For eight long years we Americans have waited for Obamacare to be repealed. Republicans have used the promise of repeal to get reelected. It appears this was a false promise, a betrayal. Published February 12, 2017

President Donald Trump salutes back to a Marines honor guard member as he disembarks Marine One upon arrival at the White House in Washington, Sunday, Feb. 12, 2017, from a trip to Florida. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

No sanctuary for the money

Some of our big-city mayors are having a high old time on a play date, with demonstrations of piety and righteous indignation in a game of "you show me yours and I'll show you mine." They get to needle President Trump from a distance for his attempt to impose order on the rush of illegal immigrants into the United States. Published February 12, 2017