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President Trump embraced a Republican-sponsored bill last week that would trim the broad range of family relationships that qualify for immigration and inject a government screen for needed skills and English proficiency into employer immigration. (Associated Press/File)

A good start on immigration reform

Why enact a law or write an executive order to reform a broken immigration system when a poem will do? President Trump endorsed new immigration legislation Wednesday, moving to a merit-based system, and it was greeted with predictable cries and squeals from advocates of open borders. Published August 2, 2017

A health care fit for everyone?

The best solution to Obamacare is to repeal it and not replace it. Get government out of health care and let the free market take care of things. But we all know that will never happen, because once you give someone something for nothing, you have a problem taking it away. Published August 2, 2017

Make students employable again

There has been much talk about the student-loan crisis. There is indeed a crisis, with nearly $1.5 trillion owed. Many of the students who have taken out these loans are not able to repay because they have 'gifted' themselves with degrees in various fashionable fields of so-called 'studies,' fields with no hope of leading to employment in the students' chosen (counselor-suggested) avocation. The solution to this problem is obvious but not easy. Published August 2, 2017

Trump's on-track

Draining the swamp takes time, even if the swamp is in your own backyard. Look how many years the slime had been accumulating. Now we have someone who really cares about America and is doing his best to find the most trustworthy people with whom to surround himself. Gen. John Kelly is the latest such individual, as President Trump fine-tunes his staff, cabinet and administration. Published August 1, 2017

Let market call insurance's future

After just seven years it appears we have a health care crisis because the federal government tried to manipulate and take over the health- insurance industry -- and failed. Now that the Republicans are at the helm of government, it is clear they squandered the past seven years by not having an alternative plan. Published August 1, 2017

FILE - In this Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016, file photo, a miniature reproduction of Arturo Di Modica's "Charging Bull" sculpture sits on display at a street vendor's table outside the New York Stock Exchange, in lower Manhattan. U.S. Stocks are rising Tuesday, Aug. 1, 2017, as payment processors and banks trade higher. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

The abuse of Freddie and Fannie Mae

Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae almost took down the U.S. economy by transforming bad mortgages into something that looked valuable, but were anything but. The extraordinary bailouts that followed put everyone, for one good reason and another, shaking in their boots. Published August 1, 2017

How Republicans can still win on Obamacare

When Nancy Pelosi, the former speaker who famously said "we will read [the details of Obamacare] after we vote on it," was once asked by Chris Wallace of Fox News just what the Democrats were willing to offer Republicans as part of a grand new spirit of bipartisanship, she replied nothing. Nada. Zilch. Published August 1, 2017

Congress, learn from Parliament

As a naturalized American with a strong British heritage, I have watched with increasing amazement the total incompetence of congressional members to avoid what will now become the collapse of the American health-care system. Published July 31, 2017

Trump right on military move

There is something to be said of President Trump's tweet to keep transgender people out of the military ("Trump issues edict: Transgender troops will not serve in U.S. military," Web, July 26). As a combat-wounded Marine Vietnam veteran and former law-enforcement officer I have dealt with just about every type of human being on the face of the planet. When it comes to people who are different from most (in this case, meaning heterosexuals) we must understand they are wired differently. Published July 31, 2017

Security forces leave after a suicide attack followed by a clash between Afghan forces and Islamic State fighters during an attack on the Iraqi embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan, Monday, July 31, 2017. (AP Photos/Rahmat Gul)

The threats of war

America's longest war has cost more than 2,300 lives and 20,000 wounded, and $1.07 trillion. The value of the lives cannot be measured. Now President Trump has authorized sending 3,000 to 5,000 more troops to strengthen training and support efforts there, adding to the 9,800 Americans who are part of an international force of 13,000. Published July 31, 2017

Electric cars and gas pains

Moral preening isn't pretty, and "greener than thou" is all the rage in Europe. Volvo says that starting in 2019 it will no longer manufacture gasoline-only cars, only electrics or gas-electric hybrids. Published July 31, 2017

It's still the economy, Stupid

Donald Trump has shown a remarkable ability to survive snubs, slights and spirited assaults almost from the day he threw his hat in the ring, more than a year ago, and he seems to relish testing the depths of the loyalty of conservatives. His remarkable twitter campaign against Attorney General Jeff Sessions, a particular favorite of nearly every conservative, might be the greatest test so far. Published July 30, 2017

In this Saturday, July 15, 2017 file photo, a rosary hangs over the portrait of the late Chinese Nobel Peace laureate Liu Xiaobo is displayed outside the Chinese liaison office in Hong Kong. China cremated the body of imprisoned Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo, who died this week after a battle with liver cancer amid international criticism of Beijing for not letting him travel abroad as he had wished. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu, File)

The world ignores an outrage

The death of Nobel laureate Liu Xiaobo from late-stage liver cancer last month is further evidence that China's suppression of human rights is growing more severe. Worse still, foreign reaction to outrage in China is growing weaker, and cynical besides. Published July 30, 2017

Use modern 'fireside chats' with caution

After reading Daniel Gallington's insightful op-ed ("President Trumps tweets," Web, July 17) I am struck by another unique aspect of the tweeting experience: the intimacy of it. Although intimacy has its dangerous side, we are inescapably drawn to it like moths to a flame. Published July 30, 2017

Taking offense at history backfires

Last week in Fairfax people voted to erase the name of Confederate Army Gen. J.E.B. "Jeb" Stuart from a high school. Assisting in this, from a great distance, was celebrity Julianne Moore, who is apparently still offended and bothered by the name of her former high school from some 30-plus years ago. Most people leave high school behind when they leave to pursue other things in life, but evidently not Ms. Moore. Published July 30, 2017

Massive downsizing needed

In this era of "fake news," remorseless facts remain. The Medicare trustees have warned for more than a decade now of a coming negative cash flow and a "trust fund" depleted in 2029. Its report released earlier this month has been misleadingly characterized as positive. Only in Washington doublespeak can long-term shortfalls of $49 trillion be considered welcome. Medicare's chasm can barely be comprehended (it is nearly triple the U.S. GDP). While America has made peace with chronic deficits for several generations now, the bill is quickly coming due. Published July 30, 2017

A Palestinian living in Lebanon chants slogans as she holds a placard with Arabic read ing, "turn toward Palestine," during a sit-in in support of Palestinians and the Jerusalem holy site of Al Aqsa Mosque, in front of the United Nations Headquarters in Beirut, Lebanon, Thursday, July 20, 2017. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)

When a murderer is called a martyr

Ethics now get short shrift nearly everywhere, and what was once normal behavior is regulated only by moral ambiguity. But murder, whether by an angry spouse, street hoodlum or terrorist driven by religious fanaticism, still has no sanction. There's no justification for outbursts of butchery, and cash doled out to Palestinian terrorists and to their families is blood money, and it's to the shame of the U.S. government that some of that blood money is lifted from the pockets of Americans. Published July 27, 2017

A Romanian army tank maneuvers on a pontoon bridge on Borcea tributary to the Danube river during the Saber Guardian 17 joint military exercise with US troops, in Bordusani, Ialomita, Romania, Sunday, July 16, 2017. The Saber Guardian 17 exercises led by U.S. Army Europe began this week in Eastern Europe involving 25,000 military personnel from more than 20 allied and partner countries. (AP Photo/Andreea Alexandru)

God returns to Eastern Europe

Only a quarter of a century after the Iron Curtain rang down on the repression and official atheism of the evil empire -- "godless communism" some called it -- there's a resurgence of religious faith and identification in what was once the Soviet Union and its satraps in eastern Europe. Published July 27, 2017

Politicians, not talk radio, to blame

This week Sen. John McCain returned to the Senate to chastise his fellow senators for, among other things, listening to the loud, bombastic voices of talk radio. In so doing, Mr. McCain made clear that our problem isn't talk radio, but is instead the swamp that is Washington. Published July 27, 2017

Kudos to Trump on military move

President Trump deserves a lot of credit for making the difficult decision to ban transgender people from serving in the military. It is an important first step toward restoring American military might. Published July 27, 2017