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FILE - In this Sept. 10, 2017, file photo, San Francisco 49ers safety Eric Reid (35) kneels in front of teammates during the national anthem before an NFL football game against the Carolina Panthers in Santa Clara, Calif., Sunday. Reid was an early protester during the national anthem, joining former San Francisco teammate Colin Kaepernick last season.  (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)

Uniformed, but uninformed

Retaliation isn't always out of bounds. With their pre-game kneeling ritual, National Football League players have put a big hurt on their teams — and the fans — who pay their enormous salaries. Fans from coast to coast have responded with a forearm to the league's all-important TV ratings, leaving the muscled men flat on their backs, looking at the sky and wondering what hit them. The NFL is the king of sports entertainment, for now, but it's reassuring that when their favorite stars sneer at their country, Americans will still show where their hearts are. Published October 16, 2017

In this Sept. 29, 2017, file photo, California Gov. Jerry Brown gestures while speaking in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, file)

Cracking down on pronouns

There's something about the Left Coast. Maybe there's something in the salt water besides the makings of taffy. California was once derided as "the land of fruit and nuts," and the nuttiness has spread northward along the coast. Just when Gov. Jerry Brown of California had outgrown his reputation as Gov. Moonbeam, he does something to reclaim it. Published October 16, 2017

Medication 'motive' for shootings?

"The making of the Las Vegas murderer" (Web, Oct. 12) examines the possibility that the shooter was "radicalized." Yet earlier, the FBI, lacking any perceived motive, was asking citizens for tips that might help them find a motive. I say anyone whose mind is deranged by certain drugs doesn't need a motive. The shooter allegedly had a doctor who prescribed him Valium. Published October 16, 2017

Most crushing D.C. sports loss

In his column "Meltdown all-too-familiar for Washington fans" (Web, Oct. 13) Thom Loverro ponders where the Washington Nationals' playoff loss last Thursday to the Chicago Cubs will rank "among the D.C. Sports Hall of Failures. It's hard to judge one over the other." Published October 16, 2017

FILE - In this Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017, file photo, former President Barack Obama speaks during the Goalkeepers Conference in New York. Obama is set to return to the campaign trail for the first time since he left office with a rally to help Democrat Ralph Northam in Virginia's closely watched race for governor. The Northam campaign announced Wednesday, Oct. 11, that the lieutenant governor and Obama will appear together at an event in Richmond on Oct. 19. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)

The Iran nuclear agreement finally gets a skeptical eye

Maximum hot air, minimum bottom line. That's the prospect for the world over the next few weeks in the wake of President Trump's Friday declaration that he won't certify that the Islamic mullahs in Iran are living up to their end of the deal they made with Barack Obama. This was the one-sided agreement by which the mullahs would give up their quest for nuclear weapons. Published October 15, 2017

In this Nov. 14, 2013, file photo, producer Harvey Weinstein attends the New York premiere of "Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom" in New York. Weinstein faces multiple allegations of sexual abuse and harassment from some of the biggest names in Hollywood. (Photo by Andy Kropa/Invision/AP, File)

Democratic politicians look for ways to express high dudgeon on the cheap

Nearly a week went by before Hillary Clinton pulled together a statement about Harvey Weinstein's abuse of women. Hillary's against abusing women and it turns out that she took so long to say so because she was trying to find the words to describe how deep her outrage runs. Abuse of women, and even credible accusations of forcible rape, are not unknown in Hillaryworld. Perhaps she hoped to draft Bubba's help to describe her outrage. Bubba's good with words. Or perhaps she was so busy tabulating good ol' Harvey's contributions to various Clinton "charities" that she just didn't get around to it sooner. Published October 15, 2017

Stop ignoring founding principles

Fred Eckert's review of Charles J. Sykes' book, "How The Right Lost Its Mind" ("Conservatism betrayed," web, Oct. 9), stresses that Republicans abandoned their conservative "principles" and "truth" for "a new tribalism that valued neither." I'd say the Democrats did the same. And both parties have ignored the fundamental principles that our Declaration of Independence highlighted as "self-evident" truths 240 years ago. Published October 15, 2017

Buy your own contraception

As it rejiggers Obamacare, the Trump administration has visited anew the idea that employers opposed to contraception for recreational sex as a matter of religious belief should not be forced to pay for it. Until Obamacare was forced upon an unwelcoming public by a strict party-line vote, men and the women we dated took it upon ourselves to provide the prerequisites for such recreation, including contraception. Published October 15, 2017

Taking a knee no hero's move

I enjoyed reading Judge Andrew P. Napolitano's recent op-ed on the NFL and protected speech ("Taking a knee and protected speech," Web, Oct. 11). I agree with the old Beatrice Evelyn Hall quote, "I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it." However, I feel that the taking of a knee is really just egotistical grandstanding by players who make far more money than the average citizen of any skin color. Published October 15, 2017

Efrain Diaz Figueroa talks to volunteers from "Caritas" at the remains of the house of his sister destroyed by Hurricane Maria in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Monday, Oct. 9, 2017. Figueroa, who was visiting for a month at her sister Eneida's house when the Hurricane Maria hit the area, also lost her home in the Arroyo community. He waits for a relative to come from Boston and take him to Boston. He says that he is 70 years old and all his life working can't continue in these conditions in Puerto Rico. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

Exploiting aid to Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico is a mess. But it was a mess before Hurricane Maria swept through with new misery three weeks ago. Electricity is still at a premium. By one estimate, electric power has been restored to only 10 percent of the island's customers. Published October 12, 2017

Gubernatorial candidate Ralph Northam is part of the new trend for Virginia Democrats, who have found that their path to victory runs through the growing suburbs of Washington and Richmond, and the Tidewater area. (Associated Press/File)

The Democratic dilemma in Virginia

The race for governor of Virginia looked like a slam dunk for the Democrats only a fortnight or so ago, and now it doesn't. Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam, the Democrat, is still the betting favorite (for people who do that sort of thing), but his double-digit lead in the public-opinion polls has been cut in half. Published October 12, 2017

Millions of dollars in 'oppression'

What does "systemic oppression" look like in 2017? Apparently, a lot like $14.2 million, or the approximate worth of 49ers' safety Eric Reid's contract over the past five years. Where do I line up for such hardship? Published October 12, 2017

Let Taiwan into UNFCCC

The 23rd session of the Conference of Parties (COP23) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), which will take place next month in Bonn, Germany, is capturing worldwide attention. COP23 is the latest in the series of Conference of Parties meetings that are signatory to the Kyoto Protocol, an international treaty through which member states commit to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions. Published October 12, 2017

The honor Jerry Lewis deserved

Legendary entertainer and philanthropist Jerry Lewis has died, after receiving awards from Paris, France, and all over the world, but not from the president of the United States. Why did we deny this icon the opportunity to smell the roses of his success while he lived? Published October 11, 2017

'Mockingbird' offensive

As a full-time sixth-grade substitute teacher, I have discovered that the Pulitzer-Prize-winning book "To Kill a Mockingbird" has multiple usages of the N-word. Published October 11, 2017

President Donald Trump gives thumbs up as he boards Air Force One as he departs Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2017, at Andrews Air Force Base, Md., as he travels to Harrisburg, Pa. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Unplugging the Obama power scheme

New ideas sell better than old, and the trendy idea at the moment, the equivalent of that aroma that comes with new cars, is climate change. Or more precisely, global warming. (New labels are prescribed for fads getting soggy around the edges.) Then along came Donald Trump, who was unafraid to ask the simple question that Al Gore and his anvil chorus dreaded someone asking: Is the current view of how climate works actually accurate? The next generation deserves an honest answer. Published October 11, 2017

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., questions Wells Fargo Chief Executive Officer and President Timothy Sloan as he testifies before the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Where disaster lurks online

The Democrats pretend to be the party that knows all about high tech. But some of them would get lost on a leisurely Sunday-afternoon drive through Silicon Valley. Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, whom the Great Mentioner has suggested for consideration as the Democratic nominee for president, circa 2020, has inserted a couple of provisions into the National Defense Authorization Act which, if enacted, would put in jeopardy just about every Pentagon computer system and leave the country less safe, but — and here's why the Warren mischief is so attractive to Democrats — make the bureaucracy much bigger. Published October 11, 2017

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau participates in a keynote conversation at the 2017 Fortune Most Powerful Women Summit at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Sait Serkan Gurbuz)

Hell on the (Canadian) border

Canada is experiencing a sharp surge of illegal aliens, and they're not just a few angry Hillary voters making good on their bluster about moving north if Donald Trump won the election. Published October 10, 2017

A man is detained by Border Patrol officials after breaching border fencing separating San Diego from Tijuana, Mexico, Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2017, in San Diego. The man, who said he was from Chiapas, Mexico, was detained by agents as they prepared for a news conference to announce that contractors have begun building eight prototypes of President Donald Trump's proposed border wall with Mexico. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

Stalling the wall

There's something that doesn't love a wall, wrote the poet Robert Frost, and that something for the moment is comprised of Democrats. President Trump's long-promised wall along the U.S. border with Mexico is slowly rising from the desert floor and his noisy political opponents are mounting a campaign to bring it down. Published October 10, 2017

Pull the plug on the NFL

One thing black folks have in common with the NFL is the billions of dollars we represent in sports marketing. We must learn to use our collective influences to affect change where there is racial injustice and disparity in our communities. Published October 10, 2017