Wesley Pruden | Stories - Washington Times
Skip to content

Wesley Pruden

Wesley Pruden

American journalist legend and Vietnam War author James Wesley Pruden Jr. is Editor Emeritus of The Washington Times. Mr. Pruden’s first job in the newspaper business dates back to 1951 as a copyboy at the now defunct Arkansas Gazette where he later became a sportswriter and an assistant state editor. In 1982, he joined The Washington Times, four months after the paper began, as chief political correspondent. He became assistant managing editor in 1983, managing editor in 1985, and editor-in-chief in 1992. He retired in January 2008 and became editor-in-chief-emeritus. Mr. Pruden is known for his coverage of President Ronald Reagan. In 1991, he won the H.L. Mencken Prize for excellence in writing and commentary. Mr. Pruden writes a twice-weekly column on politics and national affairs for The Times.

Articles by Wesley Pruden

President Trump (Associated Press)

No hot date for the Nerd Prom

Guess who's not coming to dinner, and probably a good thing, too. Neither Donald Trump nor the not so loyal opposition can be trusted to sup together without sharp elbows, sneers and insults. Before the second bottle of wine is uncorked, the hard rolls (and most years the rolls are really hard) would be flying across the tables. Published February 27, 2017

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting on domestic and international human trafficking, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. With Trump are Michelle DeLaune, center, National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, and Dina Powell, right, White House Senior Counselor for Economic Initiatives. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Trumpspeak, a language rich in adjectives

Donald Trump isn't the carrier of the disease that threatens the language, but he suffers with enthusiasm. His abuse of the adjective might eventually threaten his foreign policy. Published February 23, 2017

Milo Yiannopoulos      Associated Press photo

An expensive lesson for conservatives

The more the culture bounds out of control, the more the wary have to take care with the company they keep. This applies to media that will print anything in pursuit of "clicks" and "hits," and to well-meaning organizations about whom they invite to tutor their true believers. Published February 20, 2017

President Donald Trump (Associated Press) ** FILE **

When the high-minded stoop to the low-down

Rage can lead the unwary to dangerous places, and some of our media notabilities are half-way there. E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post poses the question that bugs them most. Published February 16, 2017

John Adams (Associated Press) ** FILE **

How Trump's 'disarray' may be merely strategy

There's a hint or two that Trump Derangement Syndrome, or TDS, which has so savaged the chattering class, may be subsiding, if only a little. There's no cure for TDS, but the passion that drives it eventually exhausts the afflicted. Published February 13, 2017

Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch speaks in the East Room of the White House in Washington, in this Jan. 31, 2017, file photo. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

The painful education of Neil Gorsuch

Neil Gorsuch doesn't know much about politics and how the political class in Washington works, and that's a good thing. Politics and the law make unnatural bedfellows, and the progeny of such beds is often unnatural. Published February 9, 2017

Marine Le Pen (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Exporting the example of the new American revolution

The voice of the chicken, like the voice of the turtle, is heard in the land and it's making a fearsome racket, on final approach to the roost. The established order has been turned upside down in a flutter of fine feathers. The unmentionables and the deplorables are suddenly at the village gates. Published February 6, 2017

Rex Tillerson (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The coming test of Donald Trump

Donald Trump is about to get a tough test of his presidential leadership, with no true-or-false or multiple-choice questions. Every new president gets the test, usually administered by international creeps and bad guys. There's no fudging the answers. Reality is the teacher, grading on a steep curve, and presidents pass or fail. There's no soft grading. Published February 2, 2017

President Donald Trump speaks in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Monday, Jan. 30, 2017, before signing an executive order. Trump order is aimed at significantly cutting regulations. White House officials are calling the directive a "one in, two out" plan. It requires government agencies requesting a new regulations to identify two regulations they will cut from their own departments. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

A very special relationship is on once more

Once more, with feeling. There's a president with the proper appreciation of "the special relationship" between the United States and Great Britain. Winston Churchill is back in the Oval Office, even if it's only his head on a pedestal. Published January 30, 2017

Ronald Reagan (Associated Press) ** FILE **

A nation derided for doing the right thing

Immigration, both the legal and the illegal kind, is destined to be a contentious issue in America forever. That's the price of living in the place where everybody wants to be. Published January 26, 2017

Former President Jimmy Carter speaks at a Baptist conference in Atlanta, Thursday, Sept. 15, 2016. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Trump puts the squeeze on the government dollar

''Jaw, jaw," Winston Churchill said, "is better than war, war." The wartime leader, whose voice saved the West and civilization, would know. That sometimes goes for politics, too. Published January 23, 2017

President-elect Donald Trump, left, and his wife Melania Trump arrive to the "Make America Great Again Welcome Concert" at the Lincoln Memorial, Thursday, Jan. 19, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

A hearty last laugh for the Donald

Donald Trump's greatest contribution to America will be his stripping the media, particularly the overpaid and undereducated television media, of its last pretense to fairness and objectivity. Published January 19, 2017

Rep. Keith Ellison (Associated Press)

Democrats wasting time hating Donald Trump

Democrats who confuse hating Donald Trump with Mom and apple pie as the all-American recipe to win elections are blowing their chances, such as they are, for the 2018 midterm elections. If you're a Democrat it's never too soon to fret and stew about the prospects. Published January 16, 2017

Rex Tillerson (Associated Press)

At bat against Donald Trump's nominees: No hits, no runs, no errors

None down, with thanks to Harry Reid. The senators haven't voted yet, but shmear thick enough for a sesame bagel is turning out to be less than promised. None of Donald Trump's Cabinet choices looks in danger, or even damaged by the week's confirmation hearings. Published January 12, 2017

President Barack Obama, Vice President Joe Biden, center, and Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Joseph Dunford, left, listen as Defense Secretary Ash Carter speaks during an Armed Forces Full Honor Farewell Review for the president, Wednesday, Jan. 4, 2017, at Conmy Hall, Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall, Va. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Terrorism made easy when nobody's looking

President Obama is on his way out, and not a minute too soon. The legacy he obsesses over continues to expand in revealing ways. It may not be exactly what he thinks he's leaving, and it's more legacy than he wants. Published January 5, 2017

In this May 15, 2013, file photo, President Barack Obama sits with Attorney General Eric Holder during the 32nd annual the National Peace Officers Memorial Service on Capitol Hill in Washington. Obama has announced plans to improve Democrats down-ballot fortunes once he leaves office. He is launching an initiative with former Attorney General Eric Holder aimed at making Democratic gains when states redraw legislative district lines following the 2020 census. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

The Obama years stumble to a cheesy climax

Everyone only thought the interregnum between presidents was "the natural transition," an orderly march to the beat of neither knives, nor guns or even stones. It's the way Americans have conducted themselves since George Washington turned the house key over to John Adams. Published January 2, 2017

Benjamin Netanyahu (Associated Press)

A knife in the back with Obama's fingerprints

Barack Obama couldn't pass up his last opportunity to put a knife in the back of the Israelis, whom he has demonstrated for years in word and deed that he doesn't like very much. He doesn't like Benjamin Netanyahu, the Israeli prime minister, at all. Published December 26, 2016

The Washington Times

The amazing grace of Christmas morn

The malls and the Main Streets will fall silent. The ringing cash registers and the happy cries of children are but ghostly echoes across the silent cities. But the Christ child born in a manger 2,000 years ago lives, liberating the hearts of sinners and transforming the lives of the wicked. Published December 22, 2016